Re: M 78 and NGC 2017


MJ Post
 

Very interesting, Gregg!  It is unusual that a nebula would "light up", then go dark over such a short period of time.  Is there any speculation as to why?  Perhaps a hidden nova?
 
MJ

On 12/20/2020 4:48 PM Gregg Ruppel <ruppel0709@...> wrote:
 
 
MJ
Great image.  You might be interested to know that the variable nebula, widely known as McNeil's Nebula is not apparent on your image - that's because it apparently disappeared back in 2018 after being visible for several years.  The nebula was originally described/discovered by Patrick McNeil in January of 2004.  He imaged it with a Takahashi FC-76.  I had imaged the exact same area about a month earlier with my Tak FC-76, but failed to notice the wisp of nebulosity that wasn't there before!  I'm attaching my image...
Clear skies,

Gregg
Visit my astronomy & astrophotography site
http://www.greggsastronomy.com/
On 12/20/2020 4:28 PM, MJ Post wrote:
It seems everyone is processing data from our period of clear skies and minimal moon at DSNM.  Here's another just-completed project from our observatory - the LRO (LoBo Robotic Observatory, LoBo being both the New Mexico mascot and short for Longmont/Boulder).  Same setup - CDK14 scope, ASI 6200MM camera, one hour each R, G, and B filters.
 
NGC 2071 is the upper reflection nebula and the red glow at the top is the southern-most portion of Barnard's loop.  This is one of my favorite targets, and a pleasure to observe from our dark-sky community!
 
M.J. Post

Join DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io to automatically receive all group messages.