QSL label printing


Steve GW4BKG
 

I appreciate that this is slightly off topic but as I intend to use label printing from DXKeeper I hope you will indulge me.
I was planning to use a standalone label printer (DYMO LabelWriter) which uses thermal printing technology.
It is suggested that such labels do tend to fade over time depending where they are stored.
Has anyone any experience which such labels and can offer any advice/comments.
Many thanks.
Save
GW4BKG


Tom LeClerc
 

I have been using a Dymo label printer for a long time (15 plus years) and have never had a problem.  Fast and easy.  I suspect that storing in a hot attic, etc.  Might be an issue...

73, Yom W1TJL

On Sun, May 9, 2021, 06:27 Steve GW4BKG via groups.io <gw4bkg=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:
I appreciate that this is slightly off topic but as I intend to use label printing from DXKeeper I hope you will indulge me.
I was planning to use a standalone label printer (DYMO LabelWriter) which uses thermal printing technology.
It is suggested that such labels do tend to fade over time depending where they are stored.
Has anyone any experience which such labels and can offer any advice/comments.
Many thanks.
Save
GW4BKG






Steve GW4BKG
 

Thanks Tom,
This comments was from DYMOs own blurb.
Perhaps they are being over safe to cover themselves.
Steve
GW4BKG

On 9 May 2021, at 12:19, Tom LeClerc <wb1cby@...> wrote:

I have been using a Dymo label printer for a long time (15 plus years) and have never had a problem.  Fast and easy.  I suspect that storing in a hot attic, etc.  Might be an issue...

73, Yom W1TJL

On Sun, May 9, 2021, 06:27 Steve GW4BKG via groups.io <gw4bkg=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:
I appreciate that this is slightly off topic but as I intend to use label printing from DXKeeper I hope you will indulge me.
I was planning to use a standalone label printer (DYMO LabelWriter) which uses thermal printing technology.
It is suggested that such labels do tend to fade over time depending where they are stored.
Has anyone any experience which such labels and can offer any advice/comments.
Many thanks.
Save
GW4BKG







Dave AA6YQ
 

+ AA6YQ comments below

I appreciate that this is slightly off topic but as I intend to use label printing from DXKeeper I hope you will indulge me.
I was planning to use a standalone label printer (DYMO LabelWriter) which uses thermal printing technology.
It is suggested that such labels do tend to fade over time depending where they are stored.
Has anyone any experience which such labels and can offer any advice/comments.

+ 18 months ago, I used my Labelwriter 450 Turbo to produce labels for the small parts drawers in my garage. There's been no
noticeable fading yet.

73,

Dave, AA6YQ


Steve GW4BKG
 

Thanks Dave,
Useful to know.
73
Steve
GW4BKG

On 9 May 2021, at 18:26, Dave AA6YQ <aa6yq@ambersoft.com> wrote:

+ AA6YQ comments below

I appreciate that this is slightly off topic but as I intend to use label printing from DXKeeper I hope you will indulge me.
I was planning to use a standalone label printer (DYMO LabelWriter) which uses thermal printing technology.
It is suggested that such labels do tend to fade over time depending where they are stored.
Has anyone any experience which such labels and can offer any advice/comments.

+ 18 months ago, I used my Labelwriter 450 Turbo to produce labels for the small parts drawers in my garage. There's been no
noticeable fading yet.

73,

Dave, AA6YQ






Jon Gefaell
 

Personally, my 450 twin and 4XL rock my world. I can't imagine how I lived without them. I've had them for a long, long time. But, I don't know if I'd use them for QSL cards. Case in point, I'm helping an old friend enter what is probably around 10K+ QSOs from his paper logbooks from the last 20 years. Part of that process will include referencing a few thousand QSL cards to clear up difficult to read entries and to make them as logged. The process of applying for various awards will have to include LoTW and cards. I don't know if a LabelWriter label would have lasted that long. Hopefully, in 20 years more years, he'll be able to rumble through his cards and remember the contacts. 

Having said that, stored properly they'll likely last a long time. Think Smithsonian archives. They're preserving much much more fragile documents from much much longer ago. But not thermal printed, for the most part. ;) 

From: https://download.dymo.com/dymo/user-guides/LabelWriter/LW450Series/UG/LabelWriter_UserGuide_en-US.pdf

How long your labels will last depends on how the labels are used. Thermal paper labels, such as those printed by the LabelWriter printer, are susceptible to fading in two ways: • Exposure to direct sunlight, to fluorescent light for an extended period of time, or to extreme heat will cause fading. • Contact with plasticizers (for example, labels placed on plastic ring binders) will cause fading. In the original packaging, the shelf life for LabelWriter labels is 18 months. When labels are used for short-term applications (envelopes, packages, and so on), fading is not a problem. When labels are used to label files in a file cabinet, fading is very gradual over many years. Labels applied to the edge of a notebook that is then placed on a shelf in the sun will show signs of fading within a few months. To prolong label life when labels are not in use, store the labels in a cool, dry place and in the black bag in which they were originally packaged.


Steve GW4BKG
 

Jon,
Thank you for your very detailed reply.
My main concern was that the printed label might fade over a period of time which might not be appreciated by those that I send QSLs to.
The consensus of opinion seems to be that this should not an issue.
73
Steve
GW4BKG

On 9 May 2021, at 19:32, Jon Gefaell <jon@...> wrote:

Personally, my 450 twin and 4XL rock my world. I can't imagine how I lived without them. I've had them for a long, long time. But, I don't know if I'd use them for QSL cards. Case in point, I'm helping an old friend enter what is probably around 10K+ QSOs from his paper logbooks from the last 20 years. Part of that process will include referencing a few thousand QSL cards to clear up difficult to read entries and to make them as logged. The process of applying for various awards will have to include LoTW and cards. I don't know if a LabelWriter label would have lasted that long. Hopefully, in 20 years more years, he'll be able to rumble through his cards and remember the contacts. 

Having said that, stored properly they'll likely last a long time. Think Smithsonian archives. They're preserving much much more fragile documents from much much longer ago. But not thermal printed, for the most part. ;) 

From: https://download.dymo.com/dymo/user-guides/LabelWriter/LW450Series/UG/LabelWriter_UserGuide_en-US.pdf

How long your labels will last depends on how the labels are used. Thermal paper labels, such as those printed by the LabelWriter printer, are susceptible to fading in two ways: • Exposure to direct sunlight, to fluorescent light for an extended period of time, or to extreme heat will cause fading. • Contact with plasticizers (for example, labels placed on plastic ring binders) will cause fading. In the original packaging, the shelf life for LabelWriter labels is 18 months. When labels are used for short-term applications (envelopes, packages, and so on), fading is not a problem. When labels are used to label files in a file cabinet, fading is very gradual over many years. Labels applied to the edge of a notebook that is then placed on a shelf in the sun will show signs of fading within a few months. To prolong label life when labels are not in use, store the labels in a cool, dry place and in the black bag in which they were originally packaged.