Topics

Multicoupler - a seasonal peak in demand

Chris Moulding
 

We have been manufacturing the HF/VHF/UHF Multicouper for some years now and recently added two extra versions  for HF and VHF/UHF.

We have sold a lot of them over the years but I've always been puzzled by the big peak in demand we always get for them in April and May. I can understand that sales of antennas will tend to be seasonal as no one really wants to erect antennas in mid-winter but I cannot find what causes the peak for Multicouplers.

I've studied the statistics and the peak appears simultaneously in the UK, Europe and North America so it's not a regional thing.

The only thing I can come up with is that maybe the air show season may be starting but I'd really like to know what it is.

Maybe Multicoupler owners on the group can comment?

Regards,

Chris

david
 

Hi Chris,

I bought mine in August, when you announced an LF version.{I'm very happy with it}.

However, May is the first chance we get to do any voluntary outdoor work on the antenna farms. [It is also the month I get to cut a coax feed-cable with the brush-cutter -- every year]. Perhaps this outdoor activity prompts Amateurs in the Northern hemisphere to decide to try sharing antennas, rather than putting up lots of new ones for that additional SDR.

Best Wishes
David, GM8XBZ

-----Original Message-----
From: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io <CrossCountryWireless@groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Moulding
Sent: 16 May 2018 20:17
To: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io
Subject: [CrossCountryWireless] Multicoupler - a seasonal peak in demand

We have been manufacturing the HF/VHF/UHF Multicouper for some years now and recently added two extra versions for HF and VHF/UHF.

We have sold a lot of them over the years but I've always been puzzled by the big peak in demand we always get for them in April and May. I can understand that sales of antennas will tend to be seasonal as no one really wants to erect antennas in mid-winter but I cannot find what causes the peak for Multicouplers.

I've studied the statistics and the peak appears simultaneously in the UK, Europe and North America so it's not a regional thing.

The only thing I can come up with is that maybe the air show season may be starting but I'd really like to know what it is.

Maybe Multicoupler owners on the group can comment?

Regards,

Chris

Sean - G4UCJ
 

Hi Chris, the only thing I can think of that ties it all together is the Sporadic E season.

Perhaps people are using one wideband antenna and using it with multiple receivers to track the MUF from HF up through 6m, on to 4m and OIRT, Band 2 FM and, just maybe, 2m. A couple (or more) SDR's running off a single antenna could do the job of covering such a vast span of frequencies rather nicely.

Now if there were only a way I could couple those receivers to my single antenna... :)

Well that's what I reckon could be happening - it's what I would use one for (and one day I will get one, with any luck!).

73, Sean G4UCJ IO92 (A very happy user of the CCW Active Loop, which is currently in active duty on 6m)  

Mike Xeno
 

Maybe it's just your customers passing on the good word of the quality products you build :) 

Robert, VA3ROM
 

In my case Chris, it's because my KiwiSDR 4 independent receiving channels DRFS SDR (it's a pretty decent receiver, IHMO). I can connect it to my big HF sky loop and have room to add more KiwiSDR's with your 5 port multicoupler. So it's possible to have 5 KiwiSDRs on the multicoupler giving 20 simultaneous and separate receivers running 24/7/365. But, I'll just run the one Kiwi with some single channel analog and digital receivers (Softrock, RTL-SDR, FT857, Flex1500). That leaves my HF vertical free for transceiver purposes, but I'm mainly more into research and experimentation with propagation, Radio Jove, WSPR, antenna testing, el al.

Chris, you have the best bang for the buck on the multicoupler market with the 5 ports and a variety of multicoupler frequency spans. I just happened to have the need and it occurred in May, so statistically speaking, I'm totally random as to when I bought your product over the Canadian Victoria Day long weekend (21 May). I needed a way to add more receivers to one antenna as apposed to putting up more antennas inside my backyard city lot and running several coax lines back to the shack. A multicoupler is a much more inexpensive option and involves less work ;)

Hopefully, it will arrive sometime in the next week or so (Canada Customs has to have a go at it and bill me for a 13% HST -- a VAT by another name -- still stinks the same ;).

73

Chris Moulding
 

Thanks for all the replies and good feedback on the Multicoupler.

I had wondered if there was one reason for the peak in demand but it looks like it's a combination of many factors.

I always like to hear what uses our products are being put to as often it's not what I had in mind when I designed them.

Regards,

Chris

gary clinton
 

Hi chris ive only recently purchased  a cross country wireless loop antenna and haven’t had a chance to erect it yet ive managed to assemble the antenna  but I don’t know if it requires coax or just the ethernet cable also I understand it takes a 12volt supply can you recommend any 12volt supply? Tnx and all the best.gary

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io <CrossCountryWireless@groups.io> on behalf of Chris Moulding <chrism@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 9:29:48 PM
To: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io
Subject: Re: [CrossCountryWireless] Multicoupler - a seasonal peak in demand
 
Thanks for all the replies and good feedback on the Multicoupler.

I had wondered if there was one reason for the peak in demand but it looks like it's a combination of many factors.

I always like to hear what uses our products are being put to as often it's not what I had in mind when I designed them.

Regards,

Chris

Chris Moulding
 

The HF Loop antenna uses the ethernet cable between the loop and the base unit. RF and DC power are fed through the ethernet cable.

It does need a coax cable connection between the BNC connector on the base unit and your receiver.

It can use any power supply between 10 and 24V. For the very best results with the lowest noise background a separate 12V battery is best. Any linear power supply will also give good results. Most of the low cost "wall-wart" power supplies are now switching type supplies. Good quality switching power supplies have reasonable RF filtering but many generate a lot of RF noise that will get through the RF filtering on the power input in the base unit.

I used to be able to source a good 12V linear power supply for the antenna. Unfortunately due to EU regulations to improve energy efficiency they are no longer manufactured. I did look at the possibility of manufacturing a linear power supply but once the existing stocks of small mains transformers are used they are unlikely to be replaced due to the move to switching power supplies to meet the EU regulations.

Regards,

Chris

Gary_Gagnon@...
 

Hello Chris

How about the possibility of creating a box that uses an EU approved switching supply inside a metal box with 'appropriate' filtering on the input and output to suppress switching noises...

GaryG


From: "Chris Moulding" <chrism@...>
To: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 2:09:14 PM
Subject: Re: [CrossCountryWireless] Multicoupler - a seasonal peak in demand



I used to be able to source a good 12V linear power supply for the antenna. Unfortunately due to EU regulations to improve energy efficiency they are no longer manufactured. I did look at the possibility of manufacturing a linear power supply but once the existing stocks of small mains transformers are used they are unlikely to be replaced due to the move to switching power supplies to meet the EU regulations.


gary clinton
 

Ok tvm chris  I have a power supply  that will probably suffice sry abt coax question as I realise now how it works with ethernet cable . I take it the ampage wont matter once its not more than 2amps would that be correct sry for the hassle tnx gary

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io <CrossCountryWireless@groups.io> on behalf of Chris Moulding <chrism@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 10:09:14 PM
To: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io
Subject: Re: [CrossCountryWireless] Multicoupler - a seasonal peak in demand
 
The HF Loop antenna uses the ethernet cable between the loop and the base unit. RF and DC power are fed through the ethernet cable.

It does need a coax cable connection between the BNC connector on the base unit and your receiver.

It can use any power supply between 10 and 24V. For the very best results with the lowest noise background a separate 12V battery is best. Any linear power supply will also give good results. Most of the low cost "wall-wart" power supplies are now switching type supplies. Good quality switching power supplies have reasonable RF filtering but many generate a lot of RF noise that will get through the RF filtering on the power input in the base unit.

I used to be able to source a good 12V linear power supply for the antenna. Unfortunately due to EU regulations to improve energy efficiency they are no longer manufactured. I did look at the possibility of manufacturing a linear power supply but once the existing stocks of small mains transformers are used they are unlikely to be replaced due to the move to switching power supplies to meet the EU regulations.

Regards,

Chris

Paul
 

I got mine around this time of year to upgrade my shack distro from a TV 
distribution amp.

As the equipment is used almost exclusively for reception via Sporadic E 
it was a timing thing for me.

Paul
Sussex Coast. JO00

Icom IC-R8500, Airspy & RTL 820 SDR.
HS Publications D100 TV-DX receiver.
Sony XDR F1HD and XDR-GTK interface.
Sony 920, RDS Spy, CCW Multicoupler.
W4KMA 24-100MHz custom Log Periodic.
Wellbrook ALA1530AL1 active HF loop.
Triax MTH-13 BIII, Korner 15ele BII.
1.8M Precision dish, C-Band 66E-58W.
1.2M Gibertini dish, KuBand 70E-63W.
2.4M FortecStar dish C-Band 49E-58W.

http://www.ukdx.org.uk
www.youtube.com/Aceblaggard

gary clinton
 

Hi chris  ive discovered a power supply 12v0lt 200ma .do you think this would suffice . don’t want to damage the base unit if you see what I mean also interested in this multicoupler but don’t know much about it. Tnx for your time. Best wishes .gary

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io <CrossCountryWireless@groups.io> on behalf of Chris Moulding <chrism@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 10:09:14 PM
To: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io
Subject: Re: [CrossCountryWireless] Multicoupler - a seasonal peak in demand
 
The HF Loop antenna uses the ethernet cable between the loop and the base unit. RF and DC power are fed through the ethernet cable.

It does need a coax cable connection between the BNC connector on the base unit and your receiver.

It can use any power supply between 10 and 24V. For the very best results with the lowest noise background a separate 12V battery is best. Any linear power supply will also give good results. Most of the low cost "wall-wart" power supplies are now switching type supplies. Good quality switching power supplies have reasonable RF filtering but many generate a lot of RF noise that will get through the RF filtering on the power input in the base unit.

I used to be able to source a good 12V linear power supply for the antenna. Unfortunately due to EU regulations to improve energy efficiency they are no longer manufactured. I did look at the possibility of manufacturing a linear power supply but once the existing stocks of small mains transformers are used they are unlikely to be replaced due to the move to switching power supplies to meet the EU regulations.

Regards,

Chris