APRS


Elwyn
 

I came to CCW some years ago looking for an APRS setup but I didn't have the money then, and now I do I've gone back and... It's discontinued? Is there an alternative or have you just moved away from that one completely. http://www.crosscountrywireless.net/aprs_tnc.htm Cheers Elwyn 2e0ELW


Chris Moulding
 


We stopped making the Digi Tracker over a year ago.

Sales had dropped to near zero since most amateurs were using smartphone apps to send APRS position packets rather than use radio.

I wrote a couple of Android apps to try and generate more interest in the Digi Tracker but it only reduced sales even more. APRS Messenger Android was downloaded nearly 20000 times on Google Play before I removed it.

I did design a replacement to the Digi Tracker using an industrial DSP chip and I have a working prototype that works with all the Baofeng and Wouxen hand helds.

I can't see us putting it into production as apart from your good self no one appears to want them any more.


Regards,

Chris


Jim <mail@...>
 

On 16/12/2016 16:21, Chris Moulding wrote:

Sales had dropped to near zero since most amateurs were using smartphone apps
to send APRS position packets rather than use radio.
So they couldn't have been RADIO amateurs ...

73, Jim


Bill Vodall <wa7nwp@...>
 

We stopped making the Digi Tracker over a year ago.

Sales had dropped to near zero since most amateurs were using smartphone
apps to send APRS position packets rather than use radio.
It's nice (in a bad way) to see some real numbers. I've been
claiming that every LandLine (phone) APRS station on the air takes two
stations off RF. The user station and the second station in the
radio infrastructure that would have been supported.

Here's one resolution for 2017 - replace current APRS-IS with a better
authenticated system that passes only packets and data generated on
RF.

73,
Bill WA7NWP


I wrote a couple of Android apps to try and generate more interest in the
Digi Tracker but it only reduced sales even more. APRS Messenger Android was
downloaded nearly 20000 times on Google Play before I removed it.

I did design a replacement to the Digi Tracker using an industrial DSP chip
and I have a working prototype that works with all the Baofeng and Wouxen
hand helds.

I can't see us putting it into production as apart from your good self no
one appears to want them any more.


Regards,

Chris


WA8LMF
 

On 12/16/2016 12:33 PM, Jim wrote:
On 16/12/2016 16:21, Chris Moulding wrote:

Sales had dropped to near zero since most amateurs were using smartphone apps
> to send APRS position packets rather than use radio.

  So they couldn't have been RADIO amateurs ...

73, Jim

As I keep endlessly pointing out to hams around here, smart phone apps are no substitute for REAL RADIO on APRS !!   

1)   In the USA at least, we have hundreds of thousands of square miles of areas with zero cell coverage.  Especially in the western half of the country where population density is far lower, making full-coverage cellular build-out uneconomic.  Even in major cities, we have cellular coverage holes due to the anarchic and unmanaged way the cell networks grew.  (We actually have Chinese tourists commenting on how lousy cell coverage is in places like San Francisco, Seattle and the empty deserts around Las Vegas, compared to "back home"!)

2)   Those users originating beacons on cellular IP connections ARE INVISIBLE to RF users. Internet-originated beacons do not normally get reverse-gated to RF.   (RF users, on the other hand, are routinely gated to the APRS Internet System, and visible  on the maps and "Stations-heard" lists of internet/smartphone users.)   

3)   It is difficult for a "real" (RF) user to message a user originating on a smart phone.  Since the IP-based users don't normally get gated to RF, they don't appear on the RF users' "Stations Heard" lists.  As a result, the RF user can't just click on a callsign in a list or on a map,  and choose "Send Message".   They MUST know the exact call and SSID of the  Internet/smartphone user in advance.

4)   The vast majority of smartphone APRS apps assume continuous and unlimited access to Google Maps for their mapping displays.  Again, no cell coverage = no maps!  (Unlike computer-based RF operations with many options for locally-stored mapping that will work anywhere.)    Not to mention that endlessly scrolling, zooming, and refreshing maps sucked down over cellular connections will burn through expensive and limited monthly cellular data quotas.    

[At ham fests, I constantly have smartphone users completely uncomprehending at the notion that I have three different mapping systems that DON'T NEED Internet connections (cellular or otherwise), to provide street-level mapping of every square foot of Canada, the US and Mexico on my iOS and Windows devices.  They just keep asking "But what site is it?", and I keep saying "There IS NO site -- it's all right here stored locally" while pointing to the iPad, Windows tablet, or netbook laptop. ]



 


WA8LMF
 

On 12/16/2016 10:26 AM, lists@... wrote:
I came to CCW some years ago looking for an APRS setup but I didn't have the money then, and now I do I've gone back and... It's discontinued? Is there an alternative or have you just moved away from that one completely. http://www.crosscountrywireless.net/aprs_tnc.htm Cheers Elwyn 2e0ELW

There ARE many alternatives:

If you just want to SEND beacons (i.e. no receive), a TinyTrak III (around USD $30) and a Globalsat U-355 hockey-puck GPS (also about USD $30 on Amazon) connected to your radio will do the job, especially if you have the 6-pin miniDIN "data" port on the rear panel.  (TT 3 is essentially a single-purpose transmit-only TNC.)

For beaconing and send/receive options for messaging & mapping, substitute the TinyTrack 4 or an Argent Data OpenTracker  (around USD $60-90) for the TT3. You now have a fully-functional transmit/receive TNC that can be connected to a computer in addition to autonomous beaconing from the device. 

For a rather pricey installation, a Kenwood TM-D710 mobile (or TH-D72/D74 handheld) 2M/UHF radio with built-in APRS and built-in GPS will do the whole thing in one box.    

Or get even more lavish by adding the Italian GeoSat AVmap-6 to the Kenwood.  The AVmap6 is a 6"-screen car-navigator GPS device similar to a Garmin or TomTom.  It has the added feature of being explicitly ham APRS aware. Just connect it to the external GPS port on any of the Kenwood radios, and incoming APRS position reports received by the Kenwood will appear on it's maps with standard APRS symbols.  An added twist is that you can tap on an APRS icon on the screen and have the usual routing feature of a car GPS plot the most direct route from where you are right now to that station!


    Stephen H. Smith       
    Email:          WA8LMF (at) aol.com
    Website:        http://wa8lmf.net

   (626) 372-1238   [ Cell Phone ]

    Radio Communications Systems       Personal Computers             
    Consulting and Systems Integration
    GPS Custom Mapping   &   Radio Coverage Surveys
    File Conversions   MS-Windows Setups   Wireless LANs
 

 


Bill Vodall <wa7nwp@...>
 

to provide street-level
mapping of every square foot of Canada, the US and Mexico on my iOS and
Windows devices.
What do you use for Mexico?

I just returned from an awesome week in Guadalajara and can't wait to get back.

Hopefully they someday soon provide the convenience of reciprocal
operation that the US and Canada share. Apparently these days it's
hard to even have an existing XE license.

73
Bill


Jim <mail@...>
 

On 16/12/2016 16:21, Chris Moulding wrote:

Sales had dropped to near zero since most amateurs were using smartphone apps
to send APRS position packets rather than use radio.
On 12/16/2016 12:33 PM, Jim wrote:

So they couldn't have been RADIO amateurs ...
On 16/12/2016 18:50, WA8LMF via Groups.Io wrote:

As I keep endlessly pointing out to hams around here, smart phone apps are
no substitute for REAL RADIO on APRS !!
I expect they'd argue that cellphones use radio ...

73, Jim


Chris Moulding
 

I've just checked the actual figures from Google Play.

A total of 19971 downloads of APRS Messenger Android from Google Play with 2479 still active on Android handsets over a year after I removed the app from Google Play.

Even if only a small percentage use the app it's still gives an indication of how many amateurs think APRS is just a smartphone app!

Regards,

Chris


WA8LMF
 

On 12/16/2016 2:37 PM, Bill Vodall wrote:
to provide street-level
mapping of every square foot of Canada, the US and Mexico on my iOS and
Windows devices.
What do you use for Mexico?

I just returned from an awesome week in Guadalajara and can't wait to get back.


The last three editions of Microsoft MapPoint North America included Mexico at street level, as well as the US and Canada.    



Delorme Street Atlas and Topo North America 10 include city main streets (though not minor side streets) and cross-county highways in Mexico.   These programs, like MapPoint (both North America & Europe) and Precision Mapping, are now discontinued,   but can be found on file-sharing networks and downloaded with BitTorrrent.



Current map loads for Garmin nuvi car GPS units allow download of Mexico as well as the US and Canada during updates, if your device has enough flash memory. (You can use an inserted micro-SD card to expand capacity). 



On iOS devices,  "Pocket Earth" (a USD $3.00 app) uses VECTOR-based Open Street Maps data. This can be downloaded and stored locally,  for anywhere on the planet that has OSM data.   When you start Pocket Earth, you get a hierarchic tree display that looks like a OS file manager.  You start by selecting the "main directory" by continent, then expand the "sub-directory" branches for country. Then expand the internal administrative divisions (states, provinces, prefectures, oblasts, etc) and optionally sub-sub-directories for major cities or autonomous regions.  At any level, you can choose "Download All", so I just chose continent "North America" and sucked down all of Canada, the US, Mexico, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands in two taps.    Anything you DON'T download is still viewable when you DO have an online connection. 

I have every street in North America in about 2.7GB on my iPad and iPod Touch.  This is smoothly-zoomable-&-scrollable vector data; not the clunky fixed-scale bitmaps that most OSM-using apps download.   I.e it flows just like Precision Mapping with UIview.      My Chinese girl friend has all of Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong (but not the rest of China) on her iPhone 6 in less than .3 GB, plus all of the US and Canada (but not Mexico) in another 1.8 GB.

Open Streets volunteers have submitted an incredible amount of local detail for places around the world.  When you zoom in in Pocket Earth, you start seeing the outlines of individual structures like malls, airport terminals, stadiums, industrial complexes, major hotels/casinos, museums, etc, along with the internal (private) roads of these complexes.  You also start seeing thousands of Wikipedia logos on the maps.   These are live links that  send you to Wikepedia writeups on the object (state, city, geologic feature, mall, stadium, etc when tapped, assuming you DO have Internet connectivity,



Delorme "Earthmate"  provides what is essentially Topo North America on iOS devices.  You get the identical 3D-looking relief maps as in Topo NA run on Windows devices.   This is a multi-layer composite of data. The bottom layer is a global relief map that shows national borders, major cities and major highways all over the world.  Far more (street-level) data for North America is layered on top of the base map, with the same limited coverage of Mexico as Topo NA 10.0

Again, you can selectively download and locally cache individual states, provinces or regions.   Optionally, via in-app purchases, you can download, locally store and overlay on the maps, satellite imagery, official USGS topo quads,  Dept of the Interior public lands charts, and official NOAA/Coast Guard nautical charts. This includes both the ocean coasts and inland bodies of water (the Mississippi, the Great Lakes, etc).  Here in Michigan, I am amazed to see how much nautical detail is available for the smaller inland lakes as well as the Great Lakes.

Finally, on iOS devices, you can purchase "Navigon", an app from Garmin's German subsidiary, that recreates more-or-less the equivalent of a Garmin nuvi on your iGadget.   It is available as a separate app for each of various regions around the world. These include "Western US only", "Eastern US only", "All of the US plus Canada", etc.  "Mexico", "Latin America", "South America", "Europe", various counties of Europe individually, "Australia/NZ" etc are also available separately. As with the other apps, you can choose to download and cache locally as much or as little of the covered area as desired. 

All of these iOS apps use the i-Gadget's built-in GPS, if it has one.  Note that while all iPhones have actual hardware GPS, only the cellular-data-equipped iPads do.  Wi-Fi-only iPads lack a hardware GPS.  Instead, the operating system does an amazing job of localizing you based on your IP address and  triangulating nearly WiFi hot spots.  Without WiFi connectivity, you don't get "You are here" markers on the maps.    On my WiFi-only iPad, I use a Dual 150 external Bluetooth GPS.


Stephen H. Smith    wa8lmf (at) aol.com
Skype:        WA8LMF
EchoLink:  Node #  14400  [Think bottom of the 2-meter band]
Home Page:          http://wa8lmf.net

 _______ Windows 10 Outrages! _______
   <http://WA8LMF.net/Windows10_Info>

Live Off-The-Air APRS Activity Maps
   <http://wa8lmf.net/map>

Long-Range APRS on 30 Meters HF
   <http://wa8lmf.net/aprs/HF_APRS_Notes.htm>
 


Bill Vodall <wa7nwp@...>
 

mapping of every square foot of Canada, the US and Mexico on my iOS and
Windows devices.

What do you use for Mexico?
Thanks Steven. That posting is a keeper for sure.

Bill


Elwyn
 

On 16/12/2016 16:21, Chris Moulding wrote:

We stopped making the Digi Tracker over a year ago.

Sales had dropped to near zero since most amateurs were using smartphone
apps to send APRS position packets rather than use radio.

I wrote a couple of Android apps to try and generate more interest in
the Digi Tracker but it only reduced sales even more. APRS Messenger
Android was downloaded nearly 20000 times on Google Play before I
removed it.

I did design a replacement to the Digi Tracker using an industrial DSP
chip and I have a working prototype that works with all the Baofeng and
Wouxen hand helds.

I can't see us putting it into production as apart from your good self
no one appears to want them any more.


Regards,

Chris

_._,_._,_
-----------
There are two entries on the website.

http://www.crosscountrywireless.net/aprs_tnc.htm

and

http://www.crosscountrywireless.net/gps.htm

The latter has sales links. Do you have any still in stock?

Elwyn


Chris Moulding
 

Thanks for letting me know about that.

The gps.htm page was a very old page that didn't have a link from the index page as far as I know.

I've replaced it with a copy of the APRS TNC page to remove the PayPal button.

We don't have any stock of them or any PCBs left.

I keep the pages on the web site so that existing users have access to information and operating manuals.

Regards,

Chris


Elwyn
 

On 17/12/2016 16:55, Chris Moulding wrote:
Thanks for letting me know about that.

The gps.htm page was a very old page that didn't have a link from the
index page as far as I know.

I've replaced it with a copy of the APRS TNC page to remove the PayPal
button.

We don't have any stock of them or any PCBs left.

I keep the pages on the web site so that existing users have access to
information and operating manuals.

Regards,

Chris

_._,_._,_
Is there any way to modify any of your existing current hardware to do the TNC stuff? I was after a way to create up an igate, but I guess I'll have to get something else in...

Cheers

Elwyn


Fred Hillhouse
 

I had APRSMessenger on my phone for a long time. I was hoping that eventually an soundcard interface might be added so I could plug directly between my radio and my smartphone with a simple audio cable. It seemed to me like an obvious path. At the time I had my FT857D in my vehicle and was hoping to use 30M.

With the abundance of "outdated" smartphones it is an obvious choice rather than building a custom controller with a four line LCD display. Those were very cool at the time but the phones (even without cell access) have a lot to offer. I have paid for less cool apps and I would have gladly paid for this option. When I upgrade from my Galaxy S5, I will keep it for amateur radio projects.

I attempted to use DroidPSK but I was not successful. I was hand forming packets so I suspect I never quite got them right but it could have been propagation.

And, yes, I am an amateur radio operator.

Best regards,
Fred N7FMH

-----Original Message-----
From: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io [mailto:CrossCountryWireless@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jim

Sales had dropped to near zero since most amateurs were using smartphone apps
> to send APRS position packets rather than use radio.

So they couldn't have been RADIO amateurs ...

73, Jim


David Cutter
 

Hi Fred

I'm sure you will have a very eager audience to turn old smartphones into smartradio. All power to your elbow. I look forward to seeing an article, I sure it will spawn a whole new generation of interest.

David
G3UNA

----- Original Message -----
From: "Fred Hillhouse" <fmhillhouse@comcast.net>
To: <CrossCountryWireless@groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, December 18, 2016 1:35 PM
Subject: Re: [CrossCountryWireless] APRS


I had APRSMessenger on my phone for a long time. I was hoping that eventually an soundcard interface might be added so I could plug directly between my radio and my smartphone with a simple audio cable. It seemed to me like an obvious path. At the time I had my FT857D in my vehicle and was hoping to use 30M.

With the abundance of "outdated" smartphones it is an obvious choice rather than building a custom controller with a four line LCD display. Those were very cool at the time but the phones (even without cell access) have a lot to offer. I have paid for less cool apps and I would have gladly paid for this option. When I upgrade from my Galaxy S5, I will keep it for amateur radio projects.

I attempted to use DroidPSK but I was not successful. I was hand forming packets so I suspect I never quite got them right but it could have been propagation.

And, yes, I am an amateur radio operator.

Best regards,
Fred N7FMH


Fred Hillhouse
 

Hi David,

I wish I had the ability to create code that would do this. Sadly I rely on others that can create the applications it to see some value. And yes I would pay for it.

For general portable use, there are a few applications that are on Android. DroidPSK, DroidRTTY, and Droid SSTV, are such applications. This makes portable convenient; for mobile (tracking) not so much. The author sells an interface for various radios which I have for my FT857D. I was trying to work mobile but had a couple of interesting issues which I believe can be tracked to RF getting into the phone via audio cable. I need to focus some effort on this. I'd like it to work for the next camping season.

I use APRSISMO on my smartphone. Recently the author, KJ4ERJ, added Bluetooth capability. He added it when Kenwood released the D74. Now I need to get my equipment back together in my vehicle and try it out. It should work with my BT dongle/OT3.

For me, this seems like an incredible time for amateur radio. What can be done with SDRs, and such, and at a price that is obtainable for many is astounding. The fact that a PC can be in a phone or small tablet form factor is amazing. I have a couple of the Winbook 7s. Maybe the correct path is to use one for APRSMessenger.

Best regards,
Fred N7FMH

-----Original Message-----
From: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io [mailto:CrossCountryWireless@groups.io] On Behalf Of David Cutter
Sent: Sunday, December 18, 2016 10:31 AM
To: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io
Subject: Re: [CrossCountryWireless] APRS

Hi Fred

I'm sure you will have a very eager audience to turn old smartphones into smartradio. All power to your elbow. I look forward to seeing an article, I sure it will spawn a whole new generation of interest.

David
G3UNA


----- Original Message -----
From: "Fred Hillhouse" <fmhillhouse@comcast.net>
To: <CrossCountryWireless@groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, December 18, 2016 1:35 PM
Subject: Re: [CrossCountryWireless] APRS


I had APRSMessenger on my phone for a long time. I was hoping that
eventually an soundcard interface might be added so I could plug directly
between my radio and my smartphone with a simple audio cable. It seemed to
me like an obvious path. At the time I had my FT857D in my vehicle and was
hoping to use 30M.

With the abundance of "outdated" smartphones it is an obvious choice rather
than building a custom controller with a four line LCD display. Those were
very cool at the time but the phones (even without cell access) have a lot
to offer. I have paid for less cool apps and I would have gladly paid for
this option. When I upgrade from my Galaxy S5, I will keep it for amateur
radio projects.

I attempted to use DroidPSK but I was not successful. I was hand forming
packets so I suspect I never quite got them right but it could have been
propagation.

And, yes, I am an amateur radio operator.

Best regards,
Fred N7FMH


WA8LMF
 

On 12/18/2016 10:31 AM, David Cutter wrote:
Hi Fred

I'm sure you will have a very eager audience to turn old smartphones into smartradio.  All power to your elbow.  I look forward to seeing an article, I sure it will spawn a whole new generation of interest.

David
G3UNA

----- Original Message ----- From: "Fred Hillhouse" <fmhillhouse@...>
 
I had APRSMessenger on my phone for a long time. I was hoping that eventually an soundcard interface might be added so I could plug directly between my radio and my smartphone with a simple audio cable. It seemed to me like an obvious path. At the time I had my FT857D in my vehicle and was hoping to use 30M.

With the abundance of "outdated" smartphones it is an obvious choice rather than building a custom controller with a four line LCD display.
Fred N7FMH


It's doable now,  on iOS devices at least.  The iOS app "Pocket Packet" app is an APRS client with a built-in soundcard soft TNC.  I believe there are similar apps for Android devices.  Pocket Packet is a fully-featured APRS client with beaconing, messaging send/receive and mapping that works over both cellular data Internet and/or RF.   The RF send/receive is through the 3.5mm 4-contact TRRS combined headphone/mic jack.  

This  USD $20 cable from BaoFengTech (not the Chinese mfr, but rather a US distributor) will connect the phone/tablet/netbook to a Kenwood, BaoFeng, or Wouxun hand-held.  Search for "Btech APRS-V01" on Amazon.   Or try the BTech website at:
    <https://baofengtech.com/accessories>   

Since the connections are strictly audio in/out, there is no PTT transmit keying.  The radio must have a VOX function to work with this cable.  (The BaoFeng, Wouxun and Kenwood D72/D74 all have VOX.)

I have personally tested it with the Wouxun KG-UV8D and the Kenwood TH-D72 at the radio end.  At the computer end I have used an iPad 2, an iPad Mini 3, a Microcenter $65 7" Windows tablet and an Acer E3-111-P60S "netbook".  

Details on the cheap Winbook tablets here:

    <http://WA8LMF.net/WinbookTablet>

An alternative interface, which does NOT depend on the radio having VOX,  is my homebrew  self-powered  tone-activated  soundcard interface described here:

    <http://WA8LMF.net/ham/tonekeyer.htm>

One problem with all the smartphone-based apps is that they depend on live access to Google Maps for their mapping displays.  I.e, an old phone without a current cellular subscription, won't have a mapping display. However, they should still be able to beacon and send/receive messages.  (Assuming the device has a GPS receiver that DOESN'T depend on cellular augmentation, as many do.)

On the Windows-based devices (the Winbook tablets and the Acer netbooks) you use standard Windows applications such as UIview, APRS-IS32 or YAAC  combined with the UZ7HO Soundmodem and/or APRS Messenger.  For mapping, the usual static maps or mapping programs used with UIview (MapPoint, Precision Mapping, etc) will work on these devices.   Note that while MapPoint and Precision Mapping are now discontinued, they are widely available on the BitTorrrent peer-to-peer file sharing networks.


Stephen H. Smith    wa8lmf (at) aol.com
Skype:        WA8LMF
EchoLink:  Node #  14400  [Think bottom of the 2-meter band]
Home Page:          http://wa8lmf.net

 _______ Windows 10 Outrages! _______
   <http://WA8LMF.net/Windows10_Info>

Live Off-The-Air APRS Activity Maps
   <http://wa8lmf.net/map>

Long-Range APRS on 30 Meters HF
   <http://wa8lmf.net/aprs/HF_APRS_Notes.htm>







WA8LMF
 

On 12/18/2016 12:20 PM, Fred Hillhouse wrote:

 I have a couple of the Winbook 7s. Maybe the correct path is to use one for APRSMessenger.


I have several of these with a full complement of sound card ham software loaded on them.   I have UIview, APRSpoint, DigiPan, mmSSTV, Chromapix, WinPix32, EasyPal, mmTTY and FLdigi all crammed into the standard flash memory.  An additional 32GB SD card contains MapPoint North America, MapPoint Europe, Precision Mapping for UIview and Delore Topo North America 10.0.     See the review and pics at

   <http://WA8LMF.net/WinbookTablet>

I originally built my self-powered tone-activated interface for use with the Winbooks.  It also worked without change on my iPads, iPod Touch and Acer netbooks.

    <http://WA8LMF.net/ham/tonekeyer.htm>

I feel the 7" or 10" Windows tablets are vastly superior to kludges using old smart phones since they can use the vast array of standard off-the-shelf Windows ham software.  (There is far far more ham software for Windows than all other OSes combined.) 

Further, Windows programs tend to be far more autonomous, with everything located on the local disk drive, rather than depending on cloud services and constantly-on live Internet connections for functions such as mapping and GPS functionality (as many  Android devices do).
 This makes the Windows devices more useful in the field where you may not have Internet connectivity.  This is especially true in the interior west of the US, and most of Canada where there are hundreds and hundreds of thousands of square miles with NO cell coverage at all.


Stephen H. Smith    wa8lmf (at) aol.com
Skype:        WA8LMF
EchoLink:  Node #  14400  [Think bottom of the 2-meter band]
Home Page:          http://wa8lmf.net

 _______ Windows 10 Outrages! _______
   <http://WA8LMF.net/Windows10_Info>

Live Off-The-Air APRS Activity Maps
   <http://wa8lmf.net/map>

Long-Range APRS on 30 Meters HF
   <http://wa8lmf.net/aprs/HF_APRS_Notes.htm>



Fred Hillhouse
 

Hi Steven,

 

I have been meaning to reply sooner. I’ll blame the holidays! J

 

I bought a couple of Winbook 7s myself after finding and reading your review some time ago. But, it was after looking originally at APRSMessenger on a smartphone. Thank you for the reminder!

 

My main gripe with the Winbook is the pixel size. I wouldn’t mind being able to select 620x400 for easier viewing. I guess my second is they don’t work well with a stylus (at least none of the 5 or so I have). I haven’t found a sensitivity setting. Other than those two items, I have been quite happy with them. I have added a 64GB SD and haven’t even begun to fill it. I am even running one with Win8.1 and the other with Classic Shell.

 

I have read most of your web page. Nice collection and well done. Thank you for taking the time to put them together!

 

Best regards,

Fred N7FMH

 

 

 

 

From: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io [mailto:CrossCountryWireless@groups.io] On Behalf Of WA8LMF via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, December 18, 2016 1:13 PM
To: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io
Subject: Re: [CrossCountryWireless] APRS

 

On 12/18/2016 12:20 PM, Fred Hillhouse wrote:



 I have a couple of the Winbook 7s. Maybe the correct path is to use one for APRSMessenger.
 


I have several of these with a full complement of sound card ham software loaded on them.   I have UIview, APRSpoint, DigiPan, mmSSTV, Chromapix, WinPix32, EasyPal, mmTTY and FLdigi all crammed into the standard flash memory.  An additional 32GB SD card contains MapPoint North America, MapPoint Europe, Precision Mapping for UIview and Delore Topo North America 10.0.     See the review and pics at

   <http://WA8LMF.net/WinbookTablet>

I originally built my self-powered tone-activated interface for use with the Winbooks.  It also worked without change on my iPads, iPod Touch and Acer netbooks.

    <http://WA8LMF.net/ham/tonekeyer.htm>

I feel the 7" or 10" Windows tablets are vastly superior to kludges using old smart phones since they can use the vast array of standard off-the-shelf Windows ham software.  (There is far far more ham software for Windows than all other OSes combined.) 

Further, Windows programs tend to be far more autonomous, with everything located on the local disk drive, rather than depending on cloud services and constantly-on live Internet connections for functions such as mapping and GPS functionality (as many  Android devices do).
 This makes the Windows devices more useful in the field where you may not have Internet connectivity.  This is especially true in the interior west of the US, and most of Canada where there are hundreds and hundreds of thousands of square miles with NO cell coverage at all.


Stephen H. Smith    wa8lmf (at) aol.com
Skype:        WA8LMF
EchoLink:  Node #  14400  [Think bottom of the 2-meter band]
Home Page:          http://wa8lmf.net

 _______ Windows 10 Outrages! _______
   <http://WA8LMF.net/Windows10_Info>

Live Off-The-Air APRS Activity Maps
   <http://wa8lmf.net/map>

Long-Range APRS on 30 Meters HF
   <http://wa8lmf.net/aprs/HF_APRS_Notes.htm>