Re: Way of topic--ferrite cores


David Cutter
 

Well, the idea of putting a core into a bowl of water then in the freezer is to take advantage of the expansion of water at close to freezing point.  I think my freezers go to -18C which is good for long term food storage.

David G3UNA


On 14 August 2018 at 21:17 Tom Crosbie G6PZZ <tom@...> wrote:

Alan’s note is interesting but the UK public services and transport will have shut down way before temperatures drop as far as -50deg!!

At -15deg for a couple of weeks you will have much bigger problems than a core splitting 😊

I’m not sure the average domestic freezer can get much below -5.

Interesting question though. Not too far OT but very learned people are found here!

 

From: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io <CrossCountryWireless@groups.io> On Behalf Of David Cutter via Groups.Io
Sent: 14 August 2018 15:20
To: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io
Subject: Re: [CrossCountryWireless] Way of topic--ferrite cores

 

I recognise that, however, are ferrites water absorbant at all?  quick test, put one in a bowl of water and stick it in the freezer.  : - ]

 

David

 

From: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io [mailto:CrossCountryWireless@groups.io] On Behalf Of stephen_qrp via Groups.Io
Sent: 14 August 2018 15:10
To: CrossCountryWireless@groups.io
Subject: Re: [CrossCountryWireless] Way of topic--ferrite cores

 

Hello David

I have had this reply from Alan G4ZFQ. I do not know how I managed to miss that data sheet, it answers my question.

Regards Stephen

http://www.fair-rite.com/dev/31-material-data-sheet-2/ shows charts down to -50°C
And I guess as I've never heard anything to the contrary they survive.

73 Alan G4ZFQ

 

 

 

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