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Useless dipstick?!

parkhunter@...
 

Changed the oil on my 1948 CoBra before putting it to bed for the winter. In the process, I remembered just how useless the dipstick is. 


It’s a brass rod, bent into a loop at the end, and with a scored mark that I assume is the high level for the oil. But clean oil is invisible on the shiny brass dipstick. I usually end up touching it with my finger trying to figure out where it’s actually wet. 


At first I thought this must be a homemade part, but then I noticed a part number (1 ZN-C and a wing?) stamped at the very bottom. 


I suppose if I let the oil get dirty it would show up. But I’m wondering if others have this problem, and what you’ve done to solve it. 


- Park

Jim Bollman
 

Never saw a brass dip stick before, wonder how long they used those.

On Oct 19, 2019, at 5:20 PM, parkhunter@... wrote:

Changed the oil on my 1948 CoBra before putting it to bed for the winter. In the process, I remembered just how useless the dipstick is. 


It’s a brass rod, bent into a loop at the end, and with a scored mark that I assume is the high level for the oil. But clean oil is invisible on the shiny brass dipstick. I usually end up touching it with my finger trying to figure out where it’s actually wet. 


At first I thought this must be a homemade part, but then I noticed a part number (1 ZN-C and a wing?) stamped at the very bottom. 


I suppose if I let the oil get dirty it would show up. But I’m wondering if others have this problem, and what you’ve done to solve it. 


- Park

<89178E05-E7CB-4148-B628-894C97529016.jpeg><01DF44E2-0C1E-48F5-80B3-DDD2C3061042.jpeg><1EA2729C-9047-4077-8337-AF9EFE6BB11E.jpeg>


crosleyshortsport
 

Park,   A good bright light works well to see the wet oil. Or get a younger helper with a good set of eyes to help out 😀

On Sat, Oct 19, 2019, 5:27 PM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
Never saw a brass dip stick before, wonder how long they used those.

On Oct 19, 2019, at 5:20 PM, parkhunter@... wrote:

Changed the oil on my 1948 CoBra before putting it to bed for the winter. In the process, I remembered just how useless the dipstick is. 


It’s a brass rod, bent into a loop at the end, and with a scored mark that I assume is the high level for the oil. But clean oil is invisible on the shiny brass dipstick. I usually end up touching it with my finger trying to figure out where it’s actually wet. 


At first I thought this must be a homemade part, but then I noticed a part number (1 ZN-C and a wing?) stamped at the very bottom. 


I suppose if I let the oil get dirty it would show up. But I’m wondering if others have this problem, and what you’ve done to solve it. 


- Park

<89178E05-E7CB-4148-B628-894C97529016.jpeg><01DF44E2-0C1E-48F5-80B3-DDD2C3061042.jpeg><1EA2729C-9047-4077-8337-AF9EFE6BB11E.jpeg>


Richard Williams
 

You need the proper water pipe above the oil stick. Then you can use it. 

On Saturday, October 19, 2019, 02:56:12 PM PDT, crosleyshortsport <crosleyshortsport@...> wrote:


Park,   A good bright light works well to see the wet oil. Or get a younger helper with a good set of eyes to help out 😀
On Sat, Oct 19, 2019, 5:27 PM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
Never saw a brass dip stick before, wonder how long they used those.

On Oct 19, 2019, at 5:20 PM, parkhunter@... wrote:

Changed the oil on my 1948 CoBra before putting it to bed for the winter. In the process, I remembered just how useless the dipstick is. 


It’s a brass rod, bent into a loop at the end, and with a scored mark that I assume is the high level for the oil. But clean oil is invisible on the shiny brass dipstick. I usually end up touching it with my finger trying to figure out where it’s actually wet. 


At first I thought this must be a homemade part, but then I noticed a part number (1 ZN-C and a wing?) stamped at the very bottom. 


I suppose if I let the oil get dirty it would show up. But I’m wondering if others have this problem, and what you’ve done to solve it. 


- Park

<89178E05-E7CB-4148-B628-894C97529016.jpeg><01DF44E2-0C1E-48F5-80B3-DDD2C3061042.jpeg><1EA2729C-9047-4077-8337-AF9EFE6BB11E.jpeg>


parkhunter@...
 

I assume you are referring to my kludged coolant pipe with a PVC elbow. That actually doesn’t get in the way of the dipstick, although I do need to replace it. 


The dipstick itself drops nicely into a hole behind the starter. 

- Park

Ron D.
 

Park, I cannot offer any advice on the dipstick problem, but I must comment on the beautifully clean looking engine compartment. Keep up the great work. 

Butch
 

Park,

Drilling small holes thru it, at the appropriate locations, will help with visibility.

Butch

On 10/20/2019 7:11 AM, Ron D. wrote:
Park, I cannot offer any advice on the dipstick problem, but I must comment on the beautifully clean looking engine compartment. Keep up the great work.??
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parkhunter@...
 

I was just thinking about that today as I looked at my Insight dipstick with holes in it. 


Someone else suggested putting a few drops of food coloring in the oil. Erm, maybe? Wondering what food coloring would do in the heat of the engine? Then again it’s used for baking, so maybe not a problem. 


And, thanks for the compliment about the clean engine compartment. Unfortunately, this mostly means I haven’t been able to drive it much. 

Blessings,

Park

L.E. Hardee
 

I don't think I would add color to the oil.  Why take the chance of harming the engine.  I haven't tried this, but what if you laid the oil stick on a clean paper towel.  The oil on the dipstick would stain the towel up to the oil level.  A bit cumbersome perhaps, but how many times do you check the oil before it gets dirty enough to see on the stick.


On Mon, Oct 21, 2019 at 8:14 PM <parkhunter@...> wrote:

I was just thinking about that today as I looked at my Insight dipstick with holes in it. 


Someone else suggested putting a few drops of food coloring in the oil. Erm, maybe? Wondering what food coloring would do in the heat of the engine? Then again it’s used for baking, so maybe not a problem. 


And, thanks for the compliment about the clean engine compartment. Unfortunately, this mostly means I haven’t been able to drive it much. 

Blessings,

Park

Butch
 

I'm wit L.E., on this.

I believe that food coloring is water soluble, not too compatible with engine oil.

Butch

On 10/21/2019 8:30 PM, L.E. Hardee wrote:
I don't think I would add color to the oil.  Why take the chance of harming the engine.  I haven't tried this, but what if you laid the oil stick on a clean paper towel.  The oil on the dipstick would stain the towel up to the oil level.  A bit cumbersome perhaps, but how many times do you check the oil before it gets dirty enough to see on the stick.

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019 at 8:14 PM <parkhunter@...> wrote:

I was just thinking about that today as I looked at my Insight dipstick with holes in it. 


Someone else suggested putting a few drops of food coloring in the oil. Erm, maybe? Wondering what food coloring would do in the heat of the engine? Then again it’s used for baking, so maybe not a problem. 


And, thanks for the compliment about the clean engine compartment. Unfortunately, this mostly means I haven’t been able to drive it much. 

Blessings,

Park


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