Station wagon headliners


Mike S
 

Having now attended 2 conventions at Wauseon, I have been surprised that there is very little consistency in the restorations of our cars.  In particular, I assume (maybe wrongly?) that the wagons came from the factory with a headliner, yet I see very few cars that have them, and very few, if any, have the same type of material for their headliner.  I'm told the headline was in 3 separate pieces.

I talked to Ted at Yankee Parts & he says he has the patterns to make the cardboard headliners (am trying to contact him now).  He says I need to source the aluminum bows that were used between the different sections, as well as the aluminum "hanger strips" for the sides.  I did purchasesome side pieces at Wauseon, as well as a partial original front section of cardboard, but no luck on the bows.  Would anyone have any for sale?
thanks,
Mike S (Fritz)


Jim Liberty
 

Mike, you can make them from 3/16" rod. McMaster Carr. I am guilty of customizing my restorations on Crosleys. They just "Beg" for upgrades. That said, I keep my 356s dead stock.    ......Jim.

On Wed, Aug 11, 2021 at 2:51 PM Mike S <miso7@...> wrote:
Having now attended 2 conventions at Wauseon, I have been surprised that there is very little consistency in the restorations of our cars.  In particular, I assume (maybe wrongly?) that the wagons came from the factory with a headliner, yet I see very few cars that have them, and very few, if any, have the same type of material for their headliner.  I'm told the headline was in 3 separate pieces.

I talked to Ted at Yankee Parts & he says he has the patterns to make the cardboard headliners (am trying to contact him now).  He says I need to source the aluminum bows that were used between the different sections, as well as the aluminum "hanger strips" for the sides.  I did purchasesome side pieces at Wauseon, as well as a partial original front section of cardboard, but no luck on the bows.  Would anyone have any for sale?
thanks,
Mike S (Fritz)


Mike S
 

A rod won't work.  The bows are an "H" shaped piece of aluminum that the ends of the cardboard fit into.


Joe Brownsberger
 

I only found 2 support bows in my wagon. I have no idea what a complete set looks like, or how the front is held together. It seems to be a 3 piece head liner with 2 support bows in the middle. Mine are steel, not aluminum. Aluminum to me seems like it will be too soft and may sag. I'm going to keep mine, just thought I'd share for reference.


On Wed, Aug 11, 2021, 7:40 PM Mike S <miso7@...> wrote:
A rod won't work.  The bows are an "H" shaped piece of aluminum that the ends of the cardboard fit into.


Mike S
 

I had just assumed the bows were aluminum, but have never seen one in real life.  Thanks for the photos.  Yes, I was told the head liner was a 3 piece affair.  Could you measure yours & post a close up photo of the profile?  I might try my hand at making some.  The partial front piece I have was partially held by the sun visors & had creases to help it form to the front corners of the roof.  I'll try to post a photo tomorrow.  The back edge is edged with a small U channel of aluminum.  The sides were held with the "Z" channel that hangs on the inner roof rail.  Here's a photo of the profile of that channel.


Jim Bollman
 

Here is a link to a headliner bow and the next couple of photos after. I have never owned a Crosley with and intact headliner so can’t be of anymore help. These photos are in the Restoration Photo Album.

Jim...

On Aug 11, 2021, at 10:18 PM, Mike S <miso7@...> wrote:

I had just assumed the bows were aluminum, but have never seen one in real life.  Thanks for the photos.  Yes, I was told the head liner was a 3 piece affair.  Could you measure yours & post a close up photo of the profile?  I might try my hand at making some.  The partial front piece I have was partially held by the sun visors & had creases to help it form to the front corners of the roof.  I'll try to post a photo tomorrow.  The back edge is edged with a small U channel of aluminum.  The sides were held with the "Z" channel that hangs on the inner roof rail.  Here's a photo of the profile of that channel.<roof rail.jpg>


Paula W
 

It it's of any help, we have a 1947 Crosley sedan with an intact headliner. I'd be glad to take some photos. Again, not a station wagon and frankly the bows look a bit different than some of the photos I've seen posted. They are aluminum.


Kenn Cahill
 

Jim, thank you for posting those photos. I have two of the headliner brackets. I was not sure exactly what they were. They were originally painted black. Each of them still has three large metal buttons attached which appeared to have the headliner attached to them. It looks like they were not visible and the headliner was below/inside of them. So the brackets must’ve fit against the metal roof. The headliner covered them and was attached by the three large buttons.


Jim Bollman
 

Yet another way to go for those that are just doing nice drivers. This is not original but was posted last year as a way o put in a headliner that was not cardboard. Maybe it will give some ideas that can be adopted to a more stock look.

Jim...


L.E. Hardee
 

I am not an expert but since I have 53 Crosleys including several wagons with intact original headliners, I will try to share my thoughts.  The CC's did have a three piece headliner with smaller cardboard pieces.  I think those did have the aluminum H crossbows that the cardboard edges were inserted into.  My first Crosley was a 1952 Super wagon.   The cardboard was in 2 larger pieces, a front piece and a rear piece.  It had the steel U shaped bows with holes for the snap buttons.  The bows were placed on top of the ledge where the roof, rain gutter and body side joined.  They were bent to sit just under the roof, maybe touching it a little.  Then the cardboard was held in place by the snap buttons.  With my cars, the CC roof cardboards were tan colored, the CD was gray.  I don't know about the early CD's or the standard trim versions.  They may not have had headliners in the rear section or possibly no headliners at all.  After all, if sun visors were optional, why would headliners have been standard?


On Thu, Aug 12, 2021 at 7:24 AM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
Yet another way to go for those that are just doing nice drivers. This is not original but was posted last year as a way o put in a headliner that was not cardboard. Maybe it will give some ideas that can be adopted to a more stock look.

Jim...


Jim Liberty
 

Joe, you are right on. Porsche 356s use steel as well. I've never seen alum. used in any car.    ......Jim.

On Wed, Aug 11, 2021 at 6:37 PM Joe Brownsberger <jbraunsberg@...> wrote:
I only found 2 support bows in my wagon. I have no idea what a complete set looks like, or how the front is held together. It seems to be a 3 piece head liner with 2 support bows in the middle. Mine are steel, not aluminum. Aluminum to me seems like it will be too soft and may sag. I'm going to keep mine, just thought I'd share for reference.

On Wed, Aug 11, 2021, 7:40 PM Mike S <miso7@...> wrote:
A rod won't work.  The bows are an "H" shaped piece of aluminum that the ends of the cardboard fit into.

Attachments:


Mike S
 

Here are the remains of the front section of headliner I purchased at the meet.  The entire car (inside & out) had been painted yellow somewhere along the line, but you can see the original tan color of the cardboard in one of the photos.  You can also see the thin aluminum edging that was on the rear edge as well as the creases along the front & near the front of the sides to make it fit the front corner of the roof.  


crosleyshortsport
 

I was fortunate enough to find my 48 wagon with all the original headliner, side panels and flooring. I used the original panels to trace out the new panels. I used a thin, heavy duty, black, slightly textured, as close as I could find to original cardboard. After cutting to size, I dry fit them. I then primed and painted it to my color choice and installed them using heavy duty GE silicone adhesive. When I removed the original panels they were attached two ways. They were spot adhered and the had the two aluminum pieces across the ceiling and around all edges except for the front of the front panel, that slipped in behind the metal plates on each side that hold the visors and then fit tight to the window rubber. The original aluminum was originally a rough looking trim application. Instead of trying to duplicate the aluminum edging, I finished my edges with a cloth binding that I sewed on with a commercial machine. I primed and painted it the same color. I also made the side panels the same way and installed with the same adhesive, though I added 3/4 inch high density foam blocks, approximately 15 per side for sturdiness. My headliner and side panels are installed very solid and should never come apart. 


On Fri, Aug 13, 2021, 11:05 AM Mike S <miso7@...> wrote:
Here are the remains of the front section of headliner I purchased at the meet.  The entire car (inside & out) had been painted yellow somewhere along the line, but you can see the original tan color of the cardboard in one of the photos.  You can also see the thin aluminum edging that was on the rear edge as well as the creases along the front & near the front of the sides to make it fit the front corner of the roof.  


Terrance Robinson
 

a beautiful job!!


On Fri, Aug 13, 2021 at 8:37 PM crosleyshortsport <crosleyshortsport@...> wrote:
I was fortunate enough to find my 48 wagon with all the original headliner, side panels and flooring. I used the original panels to trace out the new panels. I used a thin, heavy duty, black, slightly textured, as close as I could find to original cardboard. After cutting to size, I dry fit them. I then primed and painted it to my color choice and installed them using heavy duty GE silicone adhesive. When I removed the original panels they were attached two ways. They were spot adhered and the had the two aluminum pieces across the ceiling and around all edges except for the front of the front panel, that slipped in behind the metal plates on each side that hold the visors and then fit tight to the window rubber. The original aluminum was originally a rough looking trim application. Instead of trying to duplicate the aluminum edging, I finished my edges with a cloth binding that I sewed on with a commercial machine. I primed and painted it the same color. I also made the side panels the same way and installed with the same adhesive, though I added 3/4 inch high density foam blocks, approximately 15 per side for sturdiness. My headliner and side panels are installed very solid and should never come apart. 

On Fri, Aug 13, 2021, 11:05 AM Mike S <miso7@...> wrote:
Here are the remains of the front section of headliner I purchased at the meet.  The entire car (inside & out) had been painted yellow somewhere along the line, but you can see the original tan color of the cardboard in one of the photos.  You can also see the thin aluminum edging that was on the rear edge as well as the creases along the front & near the front of the sides to make it fit the front corner of the roof.  



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Jim Liberty
 

BEAUTIFUL !!!     .....Jim.

On Fri, Aug 13, 2021 at 6:37 PM crosleyshortsport <crosleyshortsport@...> wrote:
I was fortunate enough to find my 48 wagon with all the original headliner, side panels and flooring. I used the original panels to trace out the new panels. I used a thin, heavy duty, black, slightly textured, as close as I could find to original cardboard. After cutting to size, I dry fit them. I then primed and painted it to my color choice and installed them using heavy duty GE silicone adhesive. When I removed the original panels they were attached two ways. They were spot adhered and the had the two aluminum pieces across the ceiling and around all edges except for the front of the front panel, that slipped in behind the metal plates on each side that hold the visors and then fit tight to the window rubber. The original aluminum was originally a rough looking trim application. Instead of trying to duplicate the aluminum edging, I finished my edges with a cloth binding that I sewed on with a commercial machine. I primed and painted it the same color. I also made the side panels the same way and installed with the same adhesive, though I added 3/4 inch high density foam blocks, approximately 15 per side for sturdiness. My headliner and side panels are installed very solid and should never come apart. 

On Fri, Aug 13, 2021, 11:05 AM Mike S <miso7@...> wrote:
Here are the remains of the front section of headliner I purchased at the meet.  The entire car (inside & out) had been painted yellow somewhere along the line, but you can see the original tan color of the cardboard in one of the photos.  You can also see the thin aluminum edging that was on the rear edge as well as the creases along the front & near the front of the sides to make it fit the front corner of the roof.  

Attachments: