Mechanical Brake Rebuild


Jim Bollman
 

I’m doing my first mechanical brake rebuild in almost 60 years. First a hint that seems to work if your brake cables are not to rusty and messed up. I took my cables off and soaked them in Evapo-Rust (available lots of places, I bought mine at Harbor Freight). It is a non toxic process and only removes rust so you can not leave things in to long. I soaked them over night then wiped the visible parts of the cable off and rinsed in water then put the backing plate end in a vise and pulled the sheath to the other end and put that end back in the Evap-Rust to soak a bit longer. Now I’m trying to decide if I should oil or grease the cables before reinstalling. I need to make or order some wedges for the cross bar to do the adjusting, The original lining is a woven style, probably asbestos. Decide to reuse it since it is in good condition for the milage the pickup will ever get. Any other tips for doing mechanical brakes anyone wants to share?


Charles Braughton
 

Use a dry silicon spray to lube your brake cables. Oil or grease collect dust and debris plus will freeze up in cold weather, don't mean to butt in, but safety first.


On Sat, Nov 20, 2021 at 10:12 AM, Jim Bollman
<Jim@...> wrote:
I’m doing my first mechanical brake rebuild in almost 60 years. First a hint that seems to work if your brake cables are not to rusty and messed up. I took my cables off and soaked them in Evapo-Rust (available lots of places, I bought mine at Harbor Freight). It is a non toxic process and only removes rust so you can not leave things in to long. I soaked them over night then wiped the visible parts of the cable off and  rinsed in water then put the backing plate end in a vise and pulled the sheath to the other end and put that end back in the Evap-Rust to soak a bit longer. Now I’m trying to decide if I should oil or grease the cables before reinstalling. I need to make or order some wedges for the cross bar to do the adjusting, The original lining is a woven style, probably asbestos. Decide to reuse it since it is in good condition for the milage the pickup will ever get. Any other tips for doing mechanical brakes anyone wants to share?





Jim Bollman
 

Good point about attracting dirt. Wonder if I can get enough silicon spray back in the sheath on the front cables. On the rear the sheath is short compared to the cable so you can pull the silicon back in but the front there isn’t that much exposed cable. I’ll give it a try. 

Anyone that wants to butt in to tell me how to or a better ways to do the brakes please do, like I said it has been along time. I switched my only mechanical brake car to hydraulics 50 years ago when I redid what I had done 70 years ago. I didn’t think I would own another with 6” brakes and figured I would convert it if I did but decided to this one with the original brakes and see if I can make them reasonably safe. My cars are all stored in a dry shop so once working right in theory they shouldn’t need much attention where hydraulics do go down hill with time even if stored properly. 

On Nov 20, 2021, at 11:24 AM, Charles Braughton via groups.io <clbraughton@...> wrote:

Use a dry silicon spray to lube your brake cables. Oil or grease collect dust and debris plus will freeze up in cold weather, don't mean to butt in, but safety first.


On Sat, Nov 20, 2021 at 10:12 AM, Jim Bollman
<Jim@...> wrote:
I’m doing my first mechanical brake rebuild in almost 60 years. First a hint that seems to work if your brake cables are not to rusty and messed up. I took my cables off and soaked them in Evapo-Rust (available lots of places, I bought mine at Harbor Freight). It is a non toxic process and only removes rust so you can not leave things in to long. I soaked them over night then wiped the visible parts of the cable off and  rinsed in water then put the backing plate end in a vise and pulled the sheath to the other end and put that end back in the Evap-Rust to soak a bit longer. Now I’m trying to decide if I should oil or grease the cables before reinstalling. I need to make or order some wedges for the cross bar to do the adjusting, The original lining is a woven style, probably asbestos. Decide to reuse it since it is in good condition for the milage the pickup will ever get. Any other tips for doing mechanical brakes anyone wants to share?






Jim Liberty
 

Gang, I did a complete re-do of my mechanical brakes on my '47 PU. I have not driven the car yet, but I'm most interested in the stopping ability. Comments anyone.    ......Jim.

On Sat, Nov 20, 2021 at 8:12 AM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
I’m doing my first mechanical brake rebuild in almost 60 years. First a hint that seems to work if your brake cables are not to rusty and messed up. I took my cables off and soaked them in Evapo-Rust (available lots of places, I bought mine at Harbor Freight). It is a non toxic process and only removes rust so you can not leave things in to long. I soaked them over night then wiped the visible parts of the cable off and  rinsed in water then put the backing plate end in a vise and pulled the sheath to the other end and put that end back in the Evap-Rust to soak a bit longer. Now I’m trying to decide if I should oil or grease the cables before reinstalling. I need to make or order some wedges for the cross bar to do the adjusting, The original lining is a woven style, probably asbestos. Decide to reuse it since it is in good condition for the milage the pickup will ever get. Any other tips for doing mechanical brakes anyone wants to share?





David Reina
 

Hi Jim,

My experience may differ as you reused the old woven style shoes and I put in new linings.  I think my car stops well now but it was a long process to get them working.

Also your question gives me an opportunity to tell a story I've been meaning to post which may be a cautionary tale for others.

First I replaced the original cables with new ones from Yankee Crosley.  I installed shoes from Service Motors.  The new shoes had a woven metallic material epoxied to the cast iron shoe.  I was preparing to bring the car up from Brooklyn to the Microcar show in the Boston area.  A automotive minded neighbor came over to help with the cable and brake adjustment.  We worked on it for over a day but could not achieve a crisp stop.  I brought the car to Boston and learned that as part of the next days activities all the cars would be going on a 100 mile tour.   (50 miles out and 50 back).  I got underneath and tightened the adjustments.  The next day I was paired with a navigator and off we went.  That area of MA has some good hills with stop signs at the bottom.  Very scary- the brakes slowed us but it just would not stop sharply.  Every time the group stopped for a break I got under the car and tried tightening further.  It didn't improve.  The last leg of the tour was up a mountain.  My navigator and I stayed behind in a parking lot and I tightened once more.  The we met the group for the trip back and we were rolling at about 40mph for over 30 minutes.  All of a sudden I heard clunking noises and the car stopped.  I got the car off to a shoulder and could tell that the front wheel locked up.  I stayed there to await a flatbed while the rest of the group headed back for a waiting dinner.  I had an arrangement with my antique car insurance to provide roadside assistance when needed.  This didn't work out as the 800 number put me in touch with a dispatcher in CA who was having trouble lining up the right service in MA.
Several hours went by and it was getting dark.  And I was worried that I would run out of battery in my cell phone.  Finally I called the event organizer and asked for help.  The arrangement before we left for the tour was that any breakdowns would be rescued.  He came with a trailer and got me back and I ate my cold supper my navigator had saved for me.  While it was still up on the trailer I pulled the wheel and drum off the front and saw the damage.  The metallic brake lining had come off the shoe, jammed things up in the drum and broken the cast iron shoe.  I pulled all the broken pieces out and closed up the drum and wheel.  My theory is that having adjusted the brake to such a tight point, a lot of heat was generated which made the epoxy which held the lining to the shoe fail.  My gut feeling is that that woven metallic lining was never bed in and bite against the drum.  If anybody else has had a positive successful outcome using that style shoe please let me know.

An interesting aside is that even with all the brake guts removed from the right front , the cars other three brakes still felt about the same and slowed the car the same as the day before.

I was able to cautiously drive the car to my in-laws house in nearby Brookline, MA.  During visits over the next year I pulled all the brakes apart.  My mother in-law had a well equipped wood shop with a drill press and stationary belt sander.  Jaks Phillips. gave me a bunch of cast iron shoes which had the original riveted linings. I stripped them down the cast iron and using standard lining material I had bought years ago from Dave Edwards I cut, drilled and countersunk the lining material and using a J.C Whitney rivet setting tool I installed the new linings on the shoes.  That went well but I remembered that Dave had warned me the new lining was a little thicker than the original.  That turned out to be the case and I couldn't put on the drum.  Using the drum as a shape guide I sanded them thinner on the stationary belt sander with a fixed table.  That took an afternoon but I got them matched to the drum diameter and installed and now the car stops great.

So Jim, that my tale and yes I think the car can be made to stop OK.  Of course that also depends on how many 200+ lb. passengers are in it.

Regards,
Dave Reina
Brooklyn, NY


-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Liberty <jimliberty356@...>
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Nov 20, 2021 2:28 pm
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Mechanical Brake Rebuild

Gang, I did a complete re-do of my mechanical brakes on my '47 PU. I have not driven the car yet, but I'm most interested in the stopping ability. Comments anyone.    ......Jim.

On Sat, Nov 20, 2021 at 8:12 AM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
I’m doing my first mechanical brake rebuild in almost 60 years. First a hint that seems to work if your brake cables are not to rusty and messed up. I took my cables off and soaked them in Evapo-Rust (available lots of places, I bought mine at Harbor Freight). It is a non toxic process and only removes rust so you can not leave things in to long. I soaked them over night then wiped the visible parts of the cable off and  rinsed in water then put the backing plate end in a vise and pulled the sheath to the other end and put that end back in the Evap-Rust to soak a bit longer. Now I’m trying to decide if I should oil or grease the cables before reinstalling. I need to make or order some wedges for the cross bar to do the adjusting, The original lining is a woven style, probably asbestos. Decide to reuse it since it is in good condition for the milage the pickup will ever get. Any other tips for doing mechanical brakes anyone wants to share?





Milford Brown
 

Jim and others,

A minor point, but silicon is a single element, whereas the various compounds used in cars, etc. are silicones - just an additional "e", along with pronunciation rhyming with "cone" instead of the "con" of the element.

Milford

On Saturday, November 20, 2021, 11:23:18 AM PST, Jim Bollman <jim@...> wrote:


Good point about attracting dirt. Wonder if I can get enough silicon spray back in the sheath on the front cables. On the rear the sheath is short compared to the cable so you can pull the silicon back in but the front there isn’t that much exposed cable. I’ll give it a try. 

Anyone that wants to butt in to tell me how to or a better ways to do the brakes please do, like I said it has been along time. I switched my only mechanical brake car to hydraulics 50 years ago when I redid what I had done 70 years ago. I didn’t think I would own another with 6” brakes and figured I would convert it if I did but decided to this one with the original brakes and see if I can make them reasonably safe. My cars are all stored in a dry shop so once working right in theory they shouldn’t need much attention where hydraulics do go down hill with time even if stored properly. 

On Nov 20, 2021, at 11:24 AM, Charles Braughton via groups.io <clbraughton@...> wrote:

Use a dry silicon spray to lube your brake cables. Oil or grease collect dust and debris plus will freeze up in cold weather, don't mean to butt in, but safety first.


On Sat, Nov 20, 2021 at 10:12 AM, Jim Bollman
<Jim@...> wrote:
I’m doing my first mechanical brake rebuild in almost 60 years. First a hint that seems to work if your brake cables are not to rusty and messed up. I took my cables off and soaked them in Evapo-Rust (available lots of places, I bought mine at Harbor Freight). It is a non toxic process and only removes rust so you can not leave things in to long. I soaked them over night then wiped the visible parts of the cable off and  rinsed in water then put the backing plate end in a vise and pulled the sheath to the other end and put that end back in the Evap-Rust to soak a bit longer. Now I’m trying to decide if I should oil or grease the cables before reinstalling. I need to make or order some wedges for the cross bar to do the adjusting, The original lining is a woven style, probably asbestos. Decide to reuse it since it is in good condition for the milage the pickup will ever get. Any other tips for doing mechanical brakes anyone wants to share?






Jim Liberty
 

Thanks Dave for recounting your experiences. I live in So. Ca. the car epicenter of the world. Just down the street is a race brake shop. I have them reline all my brakes, and after turning the drums, they arc the shoes to the drums. I do that on my early drum/hydraulic brake cars (356 Porsches) they stop on a dime.

I'm still a couple of weeks from my first drive. I'll let you know how they go, or stop.    ........Jim.

On Sat, Nov 20, 2021 at 1:39 PM David Reina via groups.io <reinadesigns=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Jim,

My experience may differ as you reused the old woven style shoes and I put in new linings.  I think my car stops well now but it was a long process to get them working.

Also your question gives me an opportunity to tell a story I've been meaning to post which may be a cautionary tale for others.

First I replaced the original cables with new ones from Yankee Crosley.  I installed shoes from Service Motors.  The new shoes had a woven metallic material epoxied to the cast iron shoe.  I was preparing to bring the car up from Brooklyn to the Microcar show in the Boston area.  A automotive minded neighbor came over to help with the cable and brake adjustment.  We worked on it for over a day but could not achieve a crisp stop.  I brought the car to Boston and learned that as part of the next days activities all the cars would be going on a 100 mile tour.   (50 miles out and 50 back).  I got underneath and tightened the adjustments.  The next day I was paired with a navigator and off we went.  That area of MA has some good hills with stop signs at the bottom.  Very scary- the brakes slowed us but it just would not stop sharply.  Every time the group stopped for a break I got under the car and tried tightening further.  It didn't improve.  The last leg of the tour was up a mountain.  My navigator and I stayed behind in a parking lot and I tightened once more.  The we met the group for the trip back and we were rolling at about 40mph for over 30 minutes.  All of a sudden I heard clunking noises and the car stopped.  I got the car off to a shoulder and could tell that the front wheel locked up.  I stayed there to await a flatbed while the rest of the group headed back for a waiting dinner.  I had an arrangement with my antique car insurance to provide roadside assistance when needed.  This didn't work out as the 800 number put me in touch with a dispatcher in CA who was having trouble lining up the right service in MA.
Several hours went by and it was getting dark.  And I was worried that I would run out of battery in my cell phone.  Finally I called the event organizer and asked for help.  The arrangement before we left for the tour was that any breakdowns would be rescued.  He came with a trailer and got me back and I ate my cold supper my navigator had saved for me.  While it was still up on the trailer I pulled the wheel and drum off the front and saw the damage.  The metallic brake lining had come off the shoe, jammed things up in the drum and broken the cast iron shoe.  I pulled all the broken pieces out and closed up the drum and wheel.  My theory is that having adjusted the brake to such a tight point, a lot of heat was generated which made the epoxy which held the lining to the shoe fail.  My gut feeling is that that woven metallic lining was never bed in and bite against the drum.  If anybody else has had a positive successful outcome using that style shoe please let me know.

An interesting aside is that even with all the brake guts removed from the right front , the cars other three brakes still felt about the same and slowed the car the same as the day before.

I was able to cautiously drive the car to my in-laws house in nearby Brookline, MA.  During visits over the next year I pulled all the brakes apart.  My mother in-law had a well equipped wood shop with a drill press and stationary belt sander.  Jaks Phillips. gave me a bunch of cast iron shoes which had the original riveted linings. I stripped them down the cast iron and using standard lining material I had bought years ago from Dave Edwards I cut, drilled and countersunk the lining material and using a J.C Whitney rivet setting tool I installed the new linings on the shoes.  That went well but I remembered that Dave had warned me the new lining was a little thicker than the original.  That turned out to be the case and I couldn't put on the drum.  Using the drum as a shape guide I sanded them thinner on the stationary belt sander with a fixed table.  That took an afternoon but I got them matched to the drum diameter and installed and now the car stops great.

So Jim, that my tale and yes I think the car can be made to stop OK.  Of course that also depends on how many 200+ lb. passengers are in it.

Regards,
Dave Reina
Brooklyn, NY


-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Liberty <jimliberty356@...>
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Nov 20, 2021 2:28 pm
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Mechanical Brake Rebuild

Gang, I did a complete re-do of my mechanical brakes on my '47 PU. I have not driven the car yet, but I'm most interested in the stopping ability. Comments anyone.    ......Jim.

On Sat, Nov 20, 2021 at 8:12 AM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
I’m doing my first mechanical brake rebuild in almost 60 years. First a hint that seems to work if your brake cables are not to rusty and messed up. I took my cables off and soaked them in Evapo-Rust (available lots of places, I bought mine at Harbor Freight). It is a non toxic process and only removes rust so you can not leave things in to long. I soaked them over night then wiped the visible parts of the cable off and  rinsed in water then put the backing plate end in a vise and pulled the sheath to the other end and put that end back in the Evap-Rust to soak a bit longer. Now I’m trying to decide if I should oil or grease the cables before reinstalling. I need to make or order some wedges for the cross bar to do the adjusting, The original lining is a woven style, probably asbestos. Decide to reuse it since it is in good condition for the milage the pickup will ever get. Any other tips for doing mechanical brakes anyone wants to share?




Attachments:


Ron D.
 

Jim,
   I have not tried this yet, but my thought to lube the brake cables would be to hang them from the garage ceiling, and spray some dry graphite spray in from the top, and slide the outer cover up and down the cable, (many times). I would repeat this process until the graphite started coming out the bottom, thus telling me the entire cable is coated. 


David Reina
 

Hi Jim.  Thats great to have that resource.  I have a buddy who always wants to change the brakes on his project car to discs although he hardly drives the cars and he never drives them hard.  I think the negatives to drums is that they can get hot and fade faster than discs and that they don't throw off water as easily as discs.  But for normal driving they can stop great.  

Dave


-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Liberty <jimliberty356@...>
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Nov 20, 2021 6:40 pm
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Mechanical Brake Rebuild

Thanks Dave for recounting your experiences. I live in So. Ca. the car epicenter of the world. Just down the street is a race brake shop. I have them reline all my brakes, and after turning the drums, they arc the shoes to the drums. I do that on my early drum/hydraulic brake cars (356 Porsches) they stop on a dime.

I'm still a couple of weeks from my first drive. I'll let you know how they go, or stop.    ........Jim.

On Sat, Nov 20, 2021 at 1:39 PM David Reina via groups.io <reinadesigns=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Jim,

My experience may differ as you reused the old woven style shoes and I put in new linings.  I think my car stops well now but it was a long process to get them working.

Also your question gives me an opportunity to tell a story I've been meaning to post which may be a cautionary tale for others.

First I replaced the original cables with new ones from Yankee Crosley.  I installed shoes from Service Motors.  The new shoes had a woven metallic material epoxied to the cast iron shoe.  I was preparing to bring the car up from Brooklyn to the Microcar show in the Boston area.  A automotive minded neighbor came over to help with the cable and brake adjustment.  We worked on it for over a day but could not achieve a crisp stop.  I brought the car to Boston and learned that as part of the next days activities all the cars would be going on a 100 mile tour.   (50 miles out and 50 back).  I got underneath and tightened the adjustments.  The next day I was paired with a navigator and off we went.  That area of MA has some good hills with stop signs at the bottom.  Very scary- the brakes slowed us but it just would not stop sharply.  Every time the group stopped for a break I got under the car and tried tightening further.  It didn't improve.  The last leg of the tour was up a mountain.  My navigator and I stayed behind in a parking lot and I tightened once more.  The we met the group for the trip back and we were rolling at about 40mph for over 30 minutes.  All of a sudden I heard clunking noises and the car stopped.  I got the car off to a shoulder and could tell that the front wheel locked up.  I stayed there to await a flatbed while the rest of the group headed back for a waiting dinner.  I had an arrangement with my antique car insurance to provide roadside assistance when needed.  This didn't work out as the 800 number put me in touch with a dispatcher in CA who was having trouble lining up the right service in MA.
Several hours went by and it was getting dark.  And I was worried that I would run out of battery in my cell phone.  Finally I called the event organizer and asked for help.  The arrangement before we left for the tour was that any breakdowns would be rescued.  He came with a trailer and got me back and I ate my cold supper my navigator had saved for me.  While it was still up on the trailer I pulled the wheel and drum off the front and saw the damage.  The metallic brake lining had come off the shoe, jammed things up in the drum and broken the cast iron shoe.  I pulled all the broken pieces out and closed up the drum and wheel.  My theory is that having adjusted the brake to such a tight point, a lot of heat was generated which made the epoxy which held the lining to the shoe fail.  My gut feeling is that that woven metallic lining was never bed in and bite against the drum.  If anybody else has had a positive successful outcome using that style shoe please let me know.

An interesting aside is that even with all the brake guts removed from the right front , the cars other three brakes still felt about the same and slowed the car the same as the day before.

I was able to cautiously drive the car to my in-laws house in nearby Brookline, MA.  During visits over the next year I pulled all the brakes apart.  My mother in-law had a well equipped wood shop with a drill press and stationary belt sander.  Jaks Phillips. gave me a bunch of cast iron shoes which had the original riveted linings. I stripped them down the cast iron and using standard lining material I had bought years ago from Dave Edwards I cut, drilled and countersunk the lining material and using a J.C Whitney rivet setting tool I installed the new linings on the shoes.  That went well but I remembered that Dave had warned me the new lining was a little thicker than the original.  That turned out to be the case and I couldn't put on the drum.  Using the drum as a shape guide I sanded them thinner on the stationary belt sander with a fixed table.  That took an afternoon but I got them matched to the drum diameter and installed and now the car stops great.

So Jim, that my tale and yes I think the car can be made to stop OK.  Of course that also depends on how many 200+ lb. passengers are in it.

Regards,
Dave Reina
Brooklyn, NY


-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Liberty <jimliberty356@...>
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Nov 20, 2021 2:28 pm
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Mechanical Brake Rebuild

Gang, I did a complete re-do of my mechanical brakes on my '47 PU. I have not driven the car yet, but I'm most interested in the stopping ability. Comments anyone.    ......Jim.

On Sat, Nov 20, 2021 at 8:12 AM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
I’m doing my first mechanical brake rebuild in almost 60 years. First a hint that seems to work if your brake cables are not to rusty and messed up. I took my cables off and soaked them in Evapo-Rust (available lots of places, I bought mine at Harbor Freight). It is a non toxic process and only removes rust so you can not leave things in to long. I soaked them over night then wiped the visible parts of the cable off and  rinsed in water then put the backing plate end in a vise and pulled the sheath to the other end and put that end back in the Evap-Rust to soak a bit longer. Now I’m trying to decide if I should oil or grease the cables before reinstalling. I need to make or order some wedges for the cross bar to do the adjusting, The original lining is a woven style, probably asbestos. Decide to reuse it since it is in good condition for the milage the pickup will ever get. Any other tips for doing mechanical brakes anyone wants to share?




Attachments:


Jim Liberty
 

Ron, I wish I had done that. The best solution. Anything that can be done to increase the mechanical downside to this system is a bonus. Dry is the way to go.    
Have any of you put a coil spring rear end into an early car. There is a "Perch" on the axle, but not on top of the frame.        
..........Jim.

On Sun, Nov 21, 2021 at 4:02 AM Ron D. <rdole417@...> wrote:
Jim,
   I have not tried this yet, but my thought to lube the brake cables would be to hang them from the garage ceiling, and spray some dry graphite spray in from the top, and slide the outer cover up and down the cable, (many times). I would repeat this process until the graphite started coming out the bottom, thus telling me the entire cable is coated. 


Jim Bollman
 

If you have a real perch on the rear end you must have an axle out of a VC, either Hotshot or Super Sport. They were the only ones that had coils on the back with one leaf to keep things aligned.

On Nov 21, 2021, at 2:07 PM, Jim Liberty <jimliberty356@...> wrote:

Ron, I wish I had done that. The best solution. Anything that can be done to increase the mechanical downside to this system is a bonus. Dry is the way to go.    
Have any of you put a coil spring rear end into an early car. There is a "Perch" on the axle, but not on top of the frame.        
..........Jim.

On Sun, Nov 21, 2021 at 4:02 AM Ron D. <rdole417@...> wrote:
Jim,
   I have not tried this yet, but my thought to lube the brake cables would be to hang them from the garage ceiling, and spray some dry graphite spray in from the top, and slide the outer cover up and down the cable, (many times). I would repeat this process until the graphite started coming out the bottom, thus telling me the entire cable is coated. 




Jim Liberty
 

Jim, are you saying the leaf stays in place. Makes sense. I sent out some pics. Could you look and comment please.     ......Jim.

On Sun, Nov 21, 2021 at 11:53 AM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
If you have a real perch on the rear end you must have an axle out of a VC, either Hotshot or Super Sport. They were the only ones that had coils on the back with one leaf to keep things aligned.

On Nov 21, 2021, at 2:07 PM, Jim Liberty <jimliberty356@...> wrote:

Ron, I wish I had done that. The best solution. Anything that can be done to increase the mechanical downside to this system is a bonus. Dry is the way to go.    
Have any of you put a coil spring rear end into an early car. There is a "Perch" on the axle, but not on top of the frame.        
..........Jim.

On Sun, Nov 21, 2021 at 4:02 AM Ron D. <rdole417@...> wrote:
Jim,
   I have not tried this yet, but my thought to lube the brake cables would be to hang them from the garage ceiling, and spray some dry graphite spray in from the top, and slide the outer cover up and down the cable, (many times). I would repeat this process until the graphite started coming out the bottom, thus telling me the entire cable is coated. 




Jim Bollman
 

They used a single leaf with the coil, not sure they are really needed with the closed driveshaft. Maybe someone with a VC can post pictures. Some say the combination made for a suspension that would stick like glue on a corner up to a point, then flip instead of sliding.

On Nov 21, 2021, at 2:56 PM, Jim Liberty <jimliberty356@...> wrote:

Jim, are you saying the leaf stays in place. Makes sense. I sent out some pics. Could you look and comment please.     ......Jim.

On Sun, Nov 21, 2021 at 11:53 AM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
If you have a real perch on the rear end you must have an axle out of a VC, either Hotshot or Super Sport. They were the only ones that had coils on the back with one leaf to keep things aligned.

On Nov 21, 2021, at 2:07 PM, Jim Liberty <jimliberty356@...> wrote:

Ron, I wish I had done that. The best solution. Anything that can be done to increase the mechanical downside to this system is a bonus. Dry is the way to go.    
Have any of you put a coil spring rear end into an early car. There is a "Perch" on the axle, but not on top of the frame.        
..........Jim.

On Sun, Nov 21, 2021 at 4:02 AM Ron D. <rdole417@...> wrote:
Jim,
   I have not tried this yet, but my thought to lube the brake cables would be to hang them from the garage ceiling, and spray some dry graphite spray in from the top, and slide the outer cover up and down the cable, (many times). I would repeat this process until the graphite started coming out the bottom, thus telling me the entire cable is coated. 







L.E. Hardee
 
Edited

Here are rear end pictures from a VC chassis I had nearby.  I hope they help.  Notice that a VC rear end doesn't have the angled rods going to the driveshaft tube.


On Sun, Nov 21, 2021, 3:02 PM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
They used a single leaf with the coil, not sure they are really needed with the closed driveshaft. Maybe someone with a VC can post pictures. Some say the combination made for a suspension that would stick like glue on a corner up to a point, then flip instead of sliding.

On Nov 21, 2021, at 2:56 PM, Jim Liberty <jimliberty356@...> wrote:

Jim, are you saying the leaf stays in place. Makes sense. I sent out some pics. Could you look and comment please.     ......Jim.

On Sun, Nov 21, 2021 at 11:53 AM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
If you have a real perch on the rear end you must have an axle out of a VC, either Hotshot or Super Sport. They were the only ones that had coils on the back with one leaf to keep things aligned.

On Nov 21, 2021, at 2:07 PM, Jim Liberty <jimliberty356@...> wrote:

Ron, I wish I had done that. The best solution. Anything that can be done to increase the mechanical downside to this system is a bonus. Dry is the way to go.    
Have any of you put a coil spring rear end into an early car. There is a "Perch" on the axle, but not on top of the frame.        
..........Jim.

On Sun, Nov 21, 2021 at 4:02 AM Ron D. <rdole417@...> wrote:
Jim,
   I have not tried this yet, but my thought to lube the brake cables would be to hang them from the garage ceiling, and spray some dry graphite spray in from the top, and slide the outer cover up and down the cable, (many times). I would repeat this process until the graphite started coming out the bottom, thus telling me the entire cable is coated. 







Jim Liberty
 

Wonderful L.E. How does the spring attach to the frame above. You guys are a Godsend. Anytime you need help with a 356 Porsche, I'm here for you.             .................Jim.

On Sun, Nov 21, 2021 at 4:23 PM L.E. Hardee <hftsales@...> wrote:
Here are rear end pictures from a VC chassis I had nearby.  I hope they help.  Notice that a VC rear end doesn't have the angled rods going to the driveshaft tube.

On Sun, Nov 21, 2021, 3:02 PM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
They used a single leaf with the coil, not sure they are really needed with the closed driveshaft. Maybe someone with a VC can post pictures. Some say the combination made for a suspension that would stick like glue on a corner up to a point, then flip instead of sliding.

On Nov 21, 2021, at 2:56 PM, Jim Liberty <jimliberty356@...> wrote:

Jim, are you saying the leaf stays in place. Makes sense. I sent out some pics. Could you look and comment please.     ......Jim.

On Sun, Nov 21, 2021 at 11:53 AM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
If you have a real perch on the rear end you must have an axle out of a VC, either Hotshot or Super Sport. They were the only ones that had coils on the back with one leaf to keep things aligned.

On Nov 21, 2021, at 2:07 PM, Jim Liberty <jimliberty356@...> wrote:

Ron, I wish I had done that. The best solution. Anything that can be done to increase the mechanical downside to this system is a bonus. Dry is the way to go.    
Have any of you put a coil spring rear end into an early car. There is a "Perch" on the axle, but not on top of the frame.        
..........Jim.

On Sun, Nov 21, 2021 at 4:02 AM Ron D. <rdole417@...> wrote:
Jim,
   I have not tried this yet, but my thought to lube the brake cables would be to hang them from the garage ceiling, and spray some dry graphite spray in from the top, and slide the outer cover up and down the cable, (many times). I would repeat this process until the graphite started coming out the bottom, thus telling me the entire cable is coated. 






Attachments:


Butch
 

Jim and all,

Yes, the single leaf is required, as an axle housing locator.
Even with the closed driveshaft, as the "ball connector", for the u-joint at the transmission, can pivot in any direction, including sideways, not just up and down.

Butch

On 11/21/2021 3:02 PM, Jim Bollman wrote:
They used a single leaf with the coil, not sure they are really needed with the closed driveshaft. Maybe someone with a VC can post pictures. Some say the combination made for a suspension that would stick like glue on a corner up to a point, then flip instead of sliding.
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Andy Drake
 

I'm thinking out loud here, but is it feasible to just swap a VC rear end into a regular car chassis without either cutting the coil springs down or Z'ing the car frame? The VC frames are very different in back specifically to mount the coil spring setup.


Jim Liberty
 

Andy, you are right. It is not a simple changeover. I will stay with the leaf spring setup.         .......Jim.

On Mon, Nov 22, 2021 at 6:39 AM Andy Drake <drakeap@...> wrote:
I'm thinking out loud here, but is it feasible to just swap a VC rear end into a regular car chassis without either cutting the coil springs down or Z'ing the car frame? The VC frames are very different in back specifically to mount the coil spring setup.


Jim Bollman
 

The Evapo-Rust did a nice job cleaning up the cables. I wiped off the ER then rinse in water and wiped down again and let dry. I had a can of graphite spray lube for locks, it has a liquid carrier and tried to spray in to sleeve but not much went in but spraying it on the exposed cable and sliding it back and forth  from both ends worked well. 

The bad news is after cleaning all the rust off of one of the rear cables there was many strands of the cable that had rusted through and the rust was all the was holding it together.

I’m checking out some used cables to see if I can find a good one to go with what I have before buying a new one.


On Nov 21, 2021, at 7:02 AM, Ron D. <rdole417@...> wrote:

Jim,
   I have not tried this yet, but my thought to lube the brake cables would be to hang them from the garage ceiling, and spray some dry graphite spray in from the top, and slide the outer cover up and down the cable, (many times). I would repeat this process until the graphite started coming out the bottom, thus telling me the entire cable is coated.