Engine swap


Raymond Wood
 

I know this is blasphemy but does anyone have any info on swapping the Crosley engine out for another engine with more horsepower and maybe an automatic transmission.


RandyG
 

I have seen a Mazada Miata engine swap and it fits well under the Crosley hood.

RandyG

On Sunday, December 12, 2021, 06:06:28 PM EST, rwould1 via groups.io <rwould1@...> wrote:


I know this is blasphemy but does anyone have any info on swapping the Crosley engine out for another engine with more horsepower and maybe an automatic transmission.


Don Pitchford
 

There have been a number of engine swaps made over the decades. I don't think any of them were wildly successful or we would see more of them. I've been collecting parts and working on designing a hot-rod Crosley for several years. I have found a lot of issues. The right transmission, especially an automatic transmission, is more of a problem than finding the right engine. There just isn't much room to squeeze in most automatic transmissions. Also, the Crosley frame isn't very strong so adding a lot of weight usually requires making a custom frame. Another issue is the rear-end ratio of a Crosley axle. A Crosley rear-end will require the engine to turn about 4000-5000 RPM at highway speed, so it's usually going to require a different rear axle as well. By the time you build the frame and make all the modifications to make it fit, it might be easier to adapt the Crosley body to another running gear. I've seen that done with a Suzuki Samurai chassis. The look might be an acquired taste!
That said, it can and has been done. There's one in nothern Illinois that has a Chevy II motor and transmission that looks good and apparently drives well. ( I don't remember who owns it, but I've seen it at the Illinois Crosley Regional meet.) 

I think a BMW or Mazda Miata engine, transmission, and rearend would likely be the least painful way to go if you want to stick with modern parts. I'm currently looking for a 1980s Ford Mustang 4 cylinder/automatic donor car for a conversion. I plan to build a new frame since I need to stretch the wheel base a foot to meet NHRA requirement.

Don Pitchford


shannon white
 

There is a guy in northern Michigan not sure of his name but he used a Ford 2.3 and automatic transmission with a narrowed Ford rear-end. It looks stock outside had to some modification to the floor for the Trans but the engine fit in the compartment well


On Mon, Dec 13, 2021 at 8:33 AM, Don Pitchford via groups.io
<w9ebk@...> wrote:
There have been a number of engine swaps made over the decades. I don't think any of them were wildly successful or we would see more of them. I've been collecting parts and working on designing a hot-rod Crosley for several years. I have found a lot of issues. The right transmission, especially an automatic transmission, is more of a problem than finding the right engine. There just isn't much room to squeeze in most automatic transmissions. Also, the Crosley frame isn't very strong so adding a lot of weight usually requires making a custom frame. Another issue is the rear-end ratio of a Crosley axle. A Crosley rear-end will require the engine to turn about 4000-5000 RPM at highway speed, so it's usually going to require a different rear axle as well. By the time you build the frame and make all the modifications to make it fit, it might be easier to adapt the Crosley body to another running gear. I've seen that done with a Suzuki Samurai chassis. The look might be an acquired taste!
That said, it can and has been done. There's one in nothern Illinois that has a Chevy II motor and transmission that looks good and apparently drives well. ( I don't remember who owns it, but I've seen it at the Illinois Crosley Regional meet.) 

I think a BMW or Mazda Miata engine, transmission, and rearend would likely be the least painful way to go if you want to stick with modern parts. I'm currently looking for a 1980s Ford Mustang 4 cylinder/automatic donor car for a conversion. I plan to build a new frame since I need to stretch the wheel base a foot to meet NHRA requirement.

Don Pitchford


nobadrivers
 

I have often wondered how a Chevrolet Chevette drive train would work?  I know they are old but if you could find one with decent miles on it. 

 

From: Crosley-Gang@groups.io [mailto:Crosley-Gang@groups.io] On Behalf Of Don Pitchford via groups.io
Sent: Monday, December 13, 2021 8:34 AM
To: crosley-gang@groups.io; Rwould1 via groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Engine swap

 

There have been a number of engine swaps made over the decades. I don't think any of them were wildly successful or we would see more of them. I've been collecting parts and working on designing a hot-rod Crosley for several years. I have found a lot of issues. The right transmission, especially an automatic transmission, is more of a problem than finding the right engine. There just isn't much room to squeeze in most automatic transmissions. Also, the Crosley frame isn't very strong so adding a lot of weight usually requires making a custom frame. Another issue is the rear-end ratio of a Crosley axle. A Crosley rear-end will require the engine to turn about 4000-5000 RPM at highway speed, so it's usually going to require a different rear axle as well. By the time you build the frame and make all the modifications to make it fit, it might be easier to adapt the Crosley body to another running gear. I've seen that done with a Suzuki Samurai chassis. The look might be an acquired taste!

That said, it can and has been done. There's one in nothern Illinois that has a Chevy II motor and transmission that looks good and apparently drives well. ( I don't remember who owns it, but I've seen it at the Illinois Crosley Regional meet.) 

 

I think a BMW or Mazda Miata engine, transmission, and rearend would likely be the least painful way to go if you want to stick with modern parts. I'm currently looking for a 1980s Ford Mustang 4 cylinder/automatic donor car for a conversion. I plan to build a new frame since I need to stretch the wheel base a foot to meet NHRA requirement.

 

Don Pitchford


D Gatens
 

Along the same lines. I am building a roadster out of my 50 CD convertible. Has anyone had any success with converting to more modern disc brakes? I currently have the Goodyear set up( that were stored on the car from 1973 in a shipping container) 
I am willing to invest for the right set up. 
Thanks 

On Mon, Dec 13, 2021 at 8:33 AM Don Pitchford via groups.io <w9ebk=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
There have been a number of engine swaps made over the decades. I don't think any of them were wildly successful or we would see more of them. I've been collecting parts and working on designing a hot-rod Crosley for several years. I have found a lot of issues. The right transmission, especially an automatic transmission, is more of a problem than finding the right engine. There just isn't much room to squeeze in most automatic transmissions. Also, the Crosley frame isn't very strong so adding a lot of weight usually requires making a custom frame. Another issue is the rear-end ratio of a Crosley axle. A Crosley rear-end will require the engine to turn about 4000-5000 RPM at highway speed, so it's usually going to require a different rear axle as well. By the time you build the frame and make all the modifications to make it fit, it might be easier to adapt the Crosley body to another running gear. I've seen that done with a Suzuki Samurai chassis. The look might be an acquired taste!
That said, it can and has been done. There's one in nothern Illinois that has a Chevy II motor and transmission that looks good and apparently drives well. ( I don't remember who owns it, but I've seen it at the Illinois Crosley Regional meet.) 

I think a BMW or Mazda Miata engine, transmission, and rearend would likely be the least painful way to go if you want to stick with modern parts. I'm currently looking for a 1980s Ford Mustang 4 cylinder/automatic donor car for a conversion. I plan to build a new frame since I need to stretch the wheel base a foot to meet NHRA requirement.

Don Pitchford


Gary Cochrane
 

I installed a Nissan 1400CC with the Nissan auto trans in my SS.  It fit ok , only having to change the sheet metal over to drive line tunnel.  I agree with the comment about needing a different rear end as my rpm,s are far to high at higher speeds.  The other problem is that I cannot get the ride comfort that a factory unit has. I think it has to do with the increased weight on the front suspension created by the heavier engine and trans.
Gary Cochrane   

On Monday, December 13, 2021, 07:43:07 AM PST, D Gatens <dongatensppg@...> wrote:


Along the same lines. I am building a roadster out of my 50 CD convertible. Has anyone had any success with converting to more modern disc brakes? I currently have the Goodyear set up( that were stored on the car from 1973 in a shipping container) 
I am willing to invest for the right set up. 
Thanks 

On Mon, Dec 13, 2021 at 8:33 AM Don Pitchford via groups.io <w9ebk=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
There have been a number of engine swaps made over the decades. I don't think any of them were wildly successful or we would see more of them. I've been collecting parts and working on designing a hot-rod Crosley for several years. I have found a lot of issues. The right transmission, especially an automatic transmission, is more of a problem than finding the right engine. There just isn't much room to squeeze in most automatic transmissions. Also, the Crosley frame isn't very strong so adding a lot of weight usually requires making a custom frame. Another issue is the rear-end ratio of a Crosley axle. A Crosley rear-end will require the engine to turn about 4000-5000 RPM at highway speed, so it's usually going to require a different rear axle as well. By the time you build the frame and make all the modifications to make it fit, it might be easier to adapt the Crosley body to another running gear. I've seen that done with a Suzuki Samurai chassis. The look might be an acquired taste!
That said, it can and has been done. There's one in nothern Illinois that has a Chevy II motor and transmission that looks good and apparently drives well. ( I don't remember who owns it, but I've seen it at the Illinois Crosley Regional meet.) 

I think a BMW or Mazda Miata engine, transmission, and rearend would likely be the least painful way to go if you want to stick with modern parts. I'm currently looking for a 1980s Ford Mustang 4 cylinder/automatic donor car for a conversion. I plan to build a new frame since I need to stretch the wheel base a foot to meet NHRA requirement.

Don Pitchford


Jim Liberty
 

Hi, I'm swapping out the three speed box for a Sprite rib-case syncro - 4 tranny. Motor will be stock except a PEPCO blower ISKY cam and military bottom end, and dual exhaust/header. Thanks to all you guys out there for helping with these parts. The car is a Crosley/Devin.      ............Jim.

On Mon, Dec 13, 2021 at 5:33 AM Don Pitchford via groups.io <w9ebk=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
There have been a number of engine swaps made over the decades. I don't think any of them were wildly successful or we would see more of them. I've been collecting parts and working on designing a hot-rod Crosley for several years. I have found a lot of issues. The right transmission, especially an automatic transmission, is more of a problem than finding the right engine. There just isn't much room to squeeze in most automatic transmissions. Also, the Crosley frame isn't very strong so adding a lot of weight usually requires making a custom frame. Another issue is the rear-end ratio of a Crosley axle. A Crosley rear-end will require the engine to turn about 4000-5000 RPM at highway speed, so it's usually going to require a different rear axle as well. By the time you build the frame and make all the modifications to make it fit, it might be easier to adapt the Crosley body to another running gear. I've seen that done with a Suzuki Samurai chassis. The look might be an acquired taste!
That said, it can and has been done. There's one in nothern Illinois that has a Chevy II motor and transmission that looks good and apparently drives well. ( I don't remember who owns it, but I've seen it at the Illinois Crosley Regional meet.) 

I think a BMW or Mazda Miata engine, transmission, and rearend would likely be the least painful way to go if you want to stick with modern parts. I'm currently looking for a 1980s Ford Mustang 4 cylinder/automatic donor car for a conversion. I plan to build a new frame since I need to stretch the wheel base a foot to meet NHRA requirement.

Don Pitchford


Jim Bollman
 

You have gotten some good suggestions already. I will point out that as soon as you add more than a hundred pounds or so to the front you better start changing the whole front suspension, not just adding leaves. If you look at how small the steering parts and spindles are you will understand. Anything that is big enough to handle an automatic transmission fits in that category of upgrade. Rear end besides being 5:17:1 gear ratio is only really good for 50-60hp if you are careful, so plan to change that. Any more than 70 or so hp better plan on boxing the frame or replacing the whole thing. As you can see it gets to be a lot of work/expense do it right. I have seen everything from Harley engines to big block Chevys installed and still be street legal, bigger for drag cars. If you give up the automatic, there are options that can add 30-150% more horsepower and still look relatively stock and weigh nearly the same. If you want more road speed you will still need to swap the rear and probably the transmission which is really only made for around 40hp plus you probably want a 4 speed synchromesh if you can't get an automatic. The Samurai full running chassis with the Crosley body attached is probably the most popular full body transplant and the best fit. 

On Dec 12, 2021, at 6:02 PM, rwould1 via groups.io <rwould1@...> wrote:

I know this is blasphemy but does anyone have any info on swapping the Crosley engine out for another engine with more horsepower and maybe an automatic transmission.


Don Pitchford
 

I looked into the Chevette a long time ago. The engine would work, but the automatic transmission Chevy used is about twice the size of the engine. I think it might have been a full size TH-350.
Don Pitchford


Don Kasbohm
 

I'd like to put a VW TDI in one. Never gonna happen! :(


Raymond Wood
 

First I want thank all of you for your responses. My plan is to use the car around town. Top speed 55-60. Mostly 35-45. I am willing to keep a standard trans. That having been said I am also thinking about going electric. Thanks again I will keep you all updated. 


nobadrivers
 

No, but a Kubota Tractor Diesel engine might work!

 

From: Crosley-Gang@groups.io [mailto:Crosley-Gang@groups.io] On Behalf Of donkasbohm@...
Sent: Monday, December 13, 2021 6:54 PM
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Engine swap

 

I'd like to put a VW TDI in one. Never gonna happen! :(


nobadrivers
 

The Chevette used the TH-180 automatic transmission smaller than the TH- 350.

 

From: Crosley-Gang@groups.io [mailto:Crosley-Gang@groups.io] On Behalf Of Don Pitchford via groups.io
Sent: Monday, December 13, 2021 5:56 PM
To: crosley-gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Engine swap

 

I looked into the Chevette a long time ago. The engine would work, but the automatic transmission Chevy used is about twice the size of the engine. I think it might have been a full size TH-350.

Don Pitchford


Jim Bollman
 

Off the top of my head I know of 3 Crosleys that have been converted to electric in reason times. One has since been converted back to stock because of the short range even with most of the back filled with batteries. One in California is a FarmOroad that used a commercially available package for the main parts. Here is the power plant on a 48 wagon at the 2021 Nationals. Click either way from this photo to see two other views of the car. http://crosleyautoclub.com/21Nationals/4-Saturday/images/50.html

One conversion I considered was a rotary out of a Mazda. I didn’t really consider the power being to high for a stock transmission and rear but figured the fast turning rotary would be a good match to the 5:17 rear and it was light weight. A friend had a dead Mazda that I could have bought cheap but luckily didn’t.

On Dec 13, 2021, at 7:04 PM, rwould1 via groups.io <rwould1@...> wrote:

First I want thank all of you for your responses. My plan is to use the car around town. Top speed 55-60. Mostly 35-45. I am willing to keep a standard trans. That having been said I am also thinking about going electric. Thanks again I will keep you all updated. 


Don Kasbohm
 

Yes, that could be an option as well, since Overland Diesel makes an adapter to mate a V2203 to a T90.
2WD T90s ain't the easiest thing in the world to come by, but they ARE out there.


David Reina
 

I think the right engine is out of a BMW K1200 motorcycle.  130 HP in a package lighter and smaller than the Crosley.  High revving too.  Somebody makes a kit to adapt that motor to a Sunbeam Imp.  I saw one set up like that at an autocross and I believe it blew away a lot of its competition.  I had one in a 1997 bike.  Very smooth and linear power.  The older bikes with that engine are inexpensive now,

My 47 sedan does fine around town at 30-40 mph.  I souped up my 51 SS as much as I knew how to so I could drive it to Waseon which I did twice.                    I could do 60+ all day.  It had a modified cam, High compression pistons, dual Tillitsons, and a Chuck Kohler exhaust header as well as an aluminum pan, steel crank and strapped mains.  When I did a compression test it was over 200 psi.  I also put grade 8 bolts in the ring gear of the differential. 

I would love to have a Datsun 5 speed in either of the cars,  I understand they made one which has an overdrive final gear and another which was 5 speeds but without the last gear being an overdrive one,  The trouble to me is how to make an adapter for the torque tube.  With most every tranny the torque tube and the drive shaft will also need to be shortened.
Dave
Brooklyn, NY

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Bollman <Jim@...>
To: Crosley-Gang <Crosley-Gang@groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Dec 13, 2021 7:38 pm
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Engine swap

Off the top of my head I know of 3 Crosleys that have been converted to electric in reason times. One has since been converted back to stock because of the short range even with most of the back filled with batteries. One in California is a FarmOroad that used a commercially available package for the main parts. Here is the power plant on a 48 wagon at the 2021 Nationals. Click either way from this photo to see two other views of the car. http://crosleyautoclub.com/21Nationals/4-Saturday/images/50.html

One conversion I considered was a rotary out of a Mazda. I didn’t really consider the power being to high for a stock transmission and rear but figured the fast turning rotary would be a good match to the 5:17 rear and it was light weight. A friend had a dead Mazda that I could have bought cheap but luckily didn’t.

On Dec 13, 2021, at 7:04 PM, rwould1 via groups.io <rwould1@...> wrote:

First I want thank all of you for your responses. My plan is to use the car around town. Top speed 55-60. Mostly 35-45. I am willing to keep a standard trans. That having been said I am also thinking about going electric. Thanks again I will keep you all updated. 


Butch
 

Jim,

Way back when, I thought that a Mazda rotary could be an ideal swap. Light weight, compact and they LOVE RPM!.

I had a 1987 RX7 Turbo II. The turbo would really start to sing, just about the time I had to back off of the throttle due to road speed. Coupled with the Mazda 5 speed transmission, it could be a great power train.

A friend of mine had a 3 rotor engine, doing nothing, as far as I know, it's still doing nothing, as we lost track of each other several years ago.

Fortunately, I too, had more important things to do and never got past the "thinking about it" stage.

Butch

On 12/13/2021 7:38 PM, Jim Bollman wrote:
One conversion I considered was a rotary out of a Mazda. I didn’t really consider the power being to high for a stock transmission and rear but figured the fast turning rotary would be a good match to the 5:17 rear and it was light weight. A friend had a dead Mazda that I could have bought cheap but luckily didn’t.
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Don Kasbohm
 

I know the Datsun B210 engine was also a popular swap at one time. Although I think today it would probably be easier to find a Crosley engine than it would be to find one of those! lol


Gary Cochrane
 

Mine was a 1978 B210. 




On Tuesday, December 14, 2021, 1:34 PM, donkasbohm@... wrote:

I know the Datsun B210 engine was also a popular swap at one time. Although I think today it would probably be easier to find a Crosley engine than it would be to find one of those! lol