Topics

electric fuel pump

paul
 

are many using an electric fuel pump on cruise vehicles as opposed to the higher restorations?  if so, I have heard that the 3-5 PSI shut off units are necessary rather than the 5-8 PSI units.  is this true because of the carburetor and engine size or an old wives tale?  the lower pressure ones are found on E Bay but with shipping run about twice the price.  appreciate any answers/thoughts,    Paul Rinehart

Jim Bollman
 

The stock mechanical pump should be between 1.5 and 3.5 lbs of pressure. You're taking a chance of forcing gas by the float valve if you exceed that. You could add a pressure regulator but that adds to the cost again. Why not just rebuild the mechanical pump or buy a new one. Service and Yankee have new pumps for $60-65.

Jim...

On Apr 14, 2018, at 4:34 PM, paul <bikertrash@...> wrote:

are many using an electric fuel pump on cruise vehicles as opposed to the higher restorations? if so, I have heard that the 3-5 PSI shut off units are necessary rather than the 5-8 PSI units. is this true because of the carburetor and engine size or an old wives tale? the lower pressure ones are found on E Bay but with shipping run about twice the price. appreciate any answers/thoughts, Paul Rinehart



paul
 

Jim,
think that is probably where I will go. these are new compared to 65+ years old. guess I just became prejudiced because my HS pump went bad shortly after I bought the car, the circus car already has an electric pump, and the 47 I just picked up has a bad one. not thinking of the age I considered the reliability but a new pump should be fine.  thanks for making me think straight,  Paul

On 4/14/2018 4:59 PM, Jim Bollman wrote:
The stock mechanical pump should be between 1.5 and 3.5 lbs of pressure. You're taking a chance of forcing gas by the float valve if you exceed that. You could add a pressure regulator but that adds to the cost again. Why not just rebuild the mechanical pump or buy a new one. Service and Yankee have new pumps for $60-65.

Jim...

Jim Bollman
 

One other piece of info. The old diaphragms material used in fuel pumps are not compatible with ethanol based gas, they melt with time. Probably along with age why they fail so often. The new rebuilding kits should have rubber that will work with ethanol.

Jim...

On Apr 14, 2018, at 5:08 PM, paul <bikertrash@...> wrote:

Jim,
think that is probably where I will go. these are new compared to 65+ years old. guess I just became prejudiced because my HS pump went bad shortly after I bought the car, the circus car already has an electric pump, and the 47 I just picked up has a bad one. not thinking of the age I considered the reliability but a new pump should be fine. thanks for making me think straight, Paul

On 4/14/2018 4:59 PM, Jim Bollman wrote:
The stock mechanical pump should be between 1.5 and 3.5 lbs of pressure. You're taking a chance of forcing gas by the float valve if you exceed that. You could add a pressure regulator but that adds to the cost again. Why not just rebuild the mechanical pump or buy a new one. Service and Yankee have new pumps for $60-65.

Jim...



dale@servicemotors.net
 

Hi paul
Myself i would stick with the original pump, but thats my opinion. Service motors has the correct electric fuel and the original mechanical pump also.

On Apr 14, 2018, at 1:34 PM, paul <bikertrash@...> wrote:

are many using an electric fuel pump on cruise vehicles as opposed to the higher restorations? if so, I have heard that the 3-5 PSI shut off units are necessary rather than the 5-8 PSI units. is this true because of the carburetor and engine size or an old wives tale? the lower pressure ones are found on E Bay but with shipping run about twice the price. appreciate any answers/thoughts, Paul Rinehart



Ron Conway
 

I tried both pumps on my 49,  them went back to the mechanical pump I got from Service motors.  The electric fuel pumps would blow  the float valve seals.  Have not had a problem since I installed the mechanical pump. 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Dale@...
Sent: Saturday, April 14, 2018 7:27 PM
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] electric fuel pump

 

Hi paul

Myself i would stick with the original pump,  but thats my opinion.  Service motors has the correct electric fuel and the original mechanical pump also.

> On Apr 14, 2018, at 1:34 PM, paul <bikertrash@...> wrote:

>

> are many using an electric fuel pump on cruise vehicles as opposed to the higher restorations?  if so, I have heard that the 3-5 PSI shut off units are necessary rather than the 5-8 PSI units.  is this true because of the carburetor and engine size or an old wives tale?  the lower pressure ones are found on E Bay but with shipping run about twice the price.  appreciate any answers/thoughts,    Paul Rinehart

>

>

>

>

 

 

 

 

paul
 

Ron,
that was the big concern. one seller on ebay says his 5-8 PSI shutoff electric is good on a Crosley,  $40. I was afraid of exactly what you experienced.  the lower pressure 2.5-4 and 3.5-5 PSI are twice the price and more.  I have been convinced that the middle ground money is best spent with a NEW factory style Crosley pump with the upgrades that withstand ethanol and today's wonderful gasoline.  thanks for re-enforcing that decision as the way to go.   Paul



On 4/15/2018 8:38 AM, Ron Conway wrote:

I tried both pumps on my 49,  them went back to the mechanical pump I got from Service motors.  The electric fuel pumps would blow  the float valve seals.  Have not had a problem since I installed the mechanical pump. 

 

 

Butch
 

Hello Paul and Gang,

Yes, anything above 3 to 3 1/2 pounds, will have a bad ending, sooner or later.

The BIG advantages of electric pumps are, 1; on cars that sit for long periods, the fuel dries up in the carb float bowls and it takes a lot of cranking, to re-prime the fuel system. 2; when the electric pump is installed properly, toward the rear of the car, it "pushes" fuel, rather than sucking it. Plus, being in a cooler location, it helps prevent vapor lock, which is far from rare, in Crosleys, especially parade and "around town" cruise cars.

And yes, the electric pump kits, that Service Motors had/has, are of the correct pressure and include a relay, to provide better power for the pump and prevent starving the voltage, at the coil.

My 2 cents, take it for what it's worth.

Butch

On 4/14/2018 5:08 PM, paul wrote:
Jim,
think that is probably where I will go. these are new compared to 65+ years old. guess I just became prejudiced because my HS pump went bad shortly after I bought the car, the circus car already has an electric pump, and the 47 I just picked up has a bad one. not thinking of the age I considered the reliability but a new pump should be fine.  thanks for making me think straight,  Paul

On 4/14/2018 4:59 PM, Jim Bollman wrote:
The stock mechanical pump should be between 1.5 and 3.5 lbs of pressure. You're taking a chance of forcing gas by the float valve if you exceed that. You could add a pressure regulator but that adds to the cost again. Why not just rebuild the mechanical pump or buy a new one. Service and Yankee have new pumps for $60-65.

Jim...



fred@...
 

I've been using the small AC 12V AP42 inline pump with great success.  The pressure at 6V is about 3 pounds - been using one on my 41 Buick also, going around the original pump, for about 20 years now

paul
 

Fred,
you answered some of the questions in my head.  proper polarity and absolute insulation from the chassis ground would allow a normally negative grounded pump to work. running on 6V rather than 12 does make for half pressure but maybe I don't understand completely. don't these pumps have a threshold shutoff at high pressure? during a slow idle of the engine doesn't this pump build more pressure and not shut off before pushing the fuel pressure beyond the designed ability of the carburetor seals? maybe I'm just worrying about too many "if"s. your success says maybe so but sometimes I'm a chicken.   thanks,  Paul Rinehart

On 4/19/2018 9:55 PM, fred@... wrote:
I've been using the small AC 12V AP42 inline pump with great success.  The pressure at 6V is about 3 pounds - been using one on my 41 Buick also, going around the original pump, for about 20 years now

fred@...
 

I think the Service Motors pumps would serve well, I had to isolate the AC pump for polarity, but all else was easy.  Butch is correct, putting and electric pump near the tank will give steady, constant pressure and good start-up performance.

Karl Black <kebdvm@...>
 

I don’t want to hijack this thread by ideas anyone know the setting for the pressure regulator that permits an easy start after the car has been sitting for awhile?

Kindest Regards,
Karl E. Black, J.D., D.V.M.
VCA Park Cities Animal Hospital
4365 Lovers Lane
University Park, Texas 75225
Phone: 214-368-8573
Fax: 214-696-1620
Cell: 214-213-7848

On Apr 22, 2018, at 6:18 PM, fred@... wrote:

I think the Service Motors pumps would serve well, I had to isolate the AC pump for polarity, but all else was easy.  Butch is correct, putting and electric pump near the tank will give steady, constant pressure and good start-up performance.

Butch
 

Karl,

There is no "setting" that will do that. The problem is, the fuel (especially today's formulations), evaporate from the carb's fuel bowl and it takes a lot of cranking, to re-prime the entire fuel (fuel pumps, lose their prime when sitting for extended periods) system AND fill the bowl.

The surest solution is, an electric pump (1 1/2 to 3 1/2 pound maximum delivery pressure), installed at the rear of the car, wired either as a priming pump or to run continuously, when the ignition is powered.

Butch

On 4/22/2018 8:10 PM, Karl Black wrote:
I don’t want to hijack this thread by ideas anyone know the setting for the pressure regulator that permits an easy start after the car has been sitting for awhile?

Kindest Regards,
Karl E. Black, J.D., D.V.M.
VCA Park Cities Animal Hospital
4365 Lovers Lane
University Park, Texas 75225
Phone: 214-368-8573
Fax: 214-696-1620
Cell: 214-213-7848

On Apr 22, 2018, at 6:18 PM, fred@... wrote:

I think the Service Motors pumps would serve well, I had to isolate the AC pump for polarity, but all else was easy.  Butch is correct, putting and electric pump near the tank will give steady, constant pressure and good start-up performance.

Virus-free. www.avast.com

Karl Black <kebdvm@...>
 

Thanks all!
That's what I have & it doesn't seem to produce enough pressure to refill the float bowl (I don't have a manometer.) My pressure regulator has settings 1-5.  I assume the larger number corresponds with a higher pressure?




On Monday, April 23, 2018 8:07 AM, Butch via Groups.Io <butch46988@...> wrote:


Karl,

There is no "setting" that will do that. The problem is, the fuel (especially today's formulations), evaporate from the carb's fuel bowl and it takes a lot of cranking, to re-prime the entire fuel (fuel pumps, lose their prime when sitting for extended periods) system AND fill the bowl.

The surest solution is, an electric pump (1 1/2 to 3 1/2 pound maximum delivery pressure), installed at the rear of the car, wired either as a priming pump or to run continuously, when the ignition is powered.

Butch

On 4/22/2018 8:10 PM, Karl Black wrote:
I don’t want to hijack this thread by ideas anyone know the setting for the pressure regulator that permits an easy start after the car has been sitting for awhile?

Kindest Regards,
Karl E. Black, J.D., D.V.M.
VCA Park Cities Animal Hospital
4365 Lovers Lane
University Park, Texas 75225
Phone: 214-368-8573
Fax: 214-696-1620
Cell: 214-213-7848

On Apr 22, 2018, at 6:18 PM, fred@... wrote:

I think the Service Motors pumps would serve well, I had to isolate the AC pump for polarity, but all else was easy.  Butch is correct, putting and electric pump near the tank will give steady, constant pressure and good start-up performance.

Virus-free. www.avast.com