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CD windshield install

Sandy Smith
 

Can anyone provide instruction, tips or tricks on installing windshield glass in a 51 CD.
Fighting with this ! Without success
Thanks

Sandy Smith

Tim Hamblen
 

You'll need a "glass paddle". Any glass company will have one. You lip in the two halves individually and then lip in the division rubber last. It would be nice to have a glass suction cup but likely you don't.Take some bar soap in a can or bowl, add a touch of water and stir it up with a paint brush till it foams, brush the foam on the inside of the rubber channel.

Jim Bollman
 

Here is a method that was posted back in 2013.

--------------------------------------------------------------------
"Peter Berard" <berard_m@...>07/08/13 #27940

Tony,
I use a method my dad taught me in the 40s, when flat windshields were the norm.
First, get son tough spall string, I got the nylon kind typically used to snap a chock line.
put the rubber over the windshield glass and place the string in the dish washing soap lubricated outside grove. Slide the rubber onto the bottom body flange and force it tight to the outside flange. with someone holding the glass tightly outward to the outside flange. Pull the string from inside the car gently while shoehorning a bit with a bent screwdriver. Work slowly, and you might have to try this several times till ya get the hang of it.

Now, I found the present day rubbers to be quite fat so a lot of coursing will be needed.

Of course the size of the glass is critical, but I had mine cut using the old glass for a pattern, so I have to blame the rubbers. I'd have made the glass a eighth inch smaller in width and height if I'd known this, but I still got em in.
Hope this helps...............p
--------------------------------------------------------------------

I have not tried it, so use at your own risk.

Jim...

On Apr 5, 2019, at 4:42 PM, Sandy Smith via Groups.Io <tarmaciron=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Can anyone provide instruction, tips or tricks on installing windshield glass in a 51 CD.
Fighting with this ! Without success
Thanks

Sandy Smith


crosleyshortsport
 

Is the rubber new, or has it been around for a while ?  I tried to put my windshield in with a rubber from 10 years ago. I quickly realized that the glass was NOT going in. I purchased a "fresh" one from Dave Edwards Crosley parts, and I was able to easily install the glass on my own, mostly with soapy water and just my hands. Only needed a blunt bent tool at the lower corners. Here is s photo of my finished project for inspiration.


On Fri, Apr 5, 2019, 5:41 PM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
Here is a method that was posted back in 2013.

--------------------------------------------------------------------
"Peter Berard" <berard_m@...>07/08/13   #27940

   Tony,
   I use a method my dad taught me in the 40s, when flat windshields were the norm.
  First, get son tough spall string, I got the nylon kind typically used to snap a chock line.
put the rubber over the windshield glass and place the string in the dish washing soap lubricated outside grove. Slide the rubber onto the bottom body flange and force it tight to the outside flange. with someone holding the glass tightly outward to the outside flange. Pull the string from inside the car gently while shoehorning a bit with a bent screwdriver. Work slowly, and you might have to try this several times till ya get the hang of it.

  Now, I found the present day rubbers to be quite fat so a lot of coursing will be needed.

   Of course the size of the glass is critical, but I had mine cut using the old glass for a pattern, so I have to blame the rubbers. I'd have made  the glass a eighth inch smaller in width and height if I'd known this, but I still got em in.
  Hope this helps...............p
--------------------------------------------------------------------

I have not tried it, so use at your own risk.

Jim...

> On Apr 5, 2019, at 4:42 PM, Sandy Smith via Groups.Io <tarmaciron=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Can anyone provide instruction, tips or tricks on installing windshield glass in a 51 CD.
> Fighting with this ! Without success
> Thanks
>
> Sandy Smith
>
>
>




Steve Perry
 

Nice car....

christopher cochrane
 

Beautiful wagon

On Apr 5, 2019, at 6:50 PM, Steve Perry <@steverino> wrote:

Nice car....


Clell
 

Peter Berard's advice is good.   Two other things might be of help.  The slot in the rubber where the strong string is placed can be lubricated with water less hand soap--the non abrasive kind.  Provides super slick flexing of the rubber.

Having installed dozens of window glass in various vehicles I learned that if the actual glass you are working with seems too large and all efforts fail to install it, it is (believe it or not) possible to grind the laminated (not tempered) glass down so it will fit.  Go to a good glass company and they will have abrasive discs to be used by an orbital grinder that is used to carefully cut down on the edge of the glass.  They will tell you to do the job carefully to not generate any heat.  When I badly needed that information the glass company actually gave me free of charge three adhesive backed discs.  I went home, and from time to time--so I didn't get carried away doing to much at one time--ground on the side of the glass that was a little too wide.   Don't know how much I took off but after a while the glass went in beautifully with help of a couple of people on the outside putting just the right amount of pressure while I pulled the string and used the plastic glass tool in a couple of tough places.

On 4/5/2019 3:41 PM, Jim Bollman wrote:
Here is a method that was posted back in 2013.

--------------------------------------------------------------------
"Peter Berard" <berard_m@...>07/08/13 #27940

Tony,
I use a method my dad taught me in the 40s, when flat windshields were the norm.
First, get son tough spall string, I got the nylon kind typically used to snap a chock line.
put the rubber over the windshield glass and place the string in the dish washing soap lubricated outside grove. Slide the rubber onto the bottom body flange and force it tight to the outside flange. with someone holding the glass tightly outward to the outside flange. Pull the string from inside the car gently while shoehorning a bit with a bent screwdriver. Work slowly, and you might have to try this several times till ya get the hang of it.
Now, I found the present day rubbers to be quite fat so a lot of coursing will be needed.
Of course the size of the glass is critical, but I had mine cut using the old glass for a pattern, so I have to blame the rubbers. I'd have made the glass a eighth inch smaller in width and height if I'd known this, but I still got em in.
Hope this helps...............p
--------------------------------------------------------------------

I have not tried it, so use at your own risk.

Jim...

On Apr 5, 2019, at 4:42 PM, Sandy Smith via Groups.Io <tarmaciron=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Can anyone provide instruction, tips or tricks on installing windshield glass in a 51 CD.
Fighting with this ! Without success
Thanks

Sandy Smith



dale@servicemotors.net
 

Hi Sandy,
First let me start by telling you it’s not going to be easy they are never fun. The only advice I could really give you is do not rope them in. Use a spoon and a hook and work it in slowly and easily. Use plenty of WD-40 or some sort of lubricant to use on the weatherstrip to make it go in easier. Another piece of advice is to make sure the weatherstrip is good and warm before you start putting it in that usually helps it. Are usually put both sides in at the same time and then install the center divider. As many as I have done it usually still takes me 2 1/2 three hours to put the windshield in. Just font get frustrated.

Dale
Service Motors

On Apr 5, 2019, at 1:42 PM, Sandy Smith via Groups.Io <tarmaciron=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Can anyone provide instruction, tips or tricks on installing windshield glass in a 51 CD.
Fighting with this ! Without success
Thanks

Sandy Smith


Paula W
 
Edited

Dale's comment inspired me to share our story -
I gave up the idea of doing it myself but had the opportunity to watch two others try on our 47 sedan, one an earnest mechanic and one a car glass installer who was recommended by a local restoration shop.

The mechanic's unsuccessful attempt was with string. The string kept breaking and cutting the rubber. I suspect he was using the wrong kind of string  but the other problem for both attempts was that it seemed like the glass and rubber was all just too big. On the advice of the mechanic we took the windshields back to where they were first cut (templates were made from originals) and asked if they could shave down the edges. They may have tried, but I didn't notice much of a difference. In truth, I didn't realize at the time how delicate and time consuming that could be so the glass cutter was likely very conservative.

The next and successful attempt was by the car glass installer using Dale's method. He used a hook (like a cotter pin removal tool). I don't remember a spoon, but he may have had some other device I can't recall. On a towel at a side workbench he set both panes of glass in the rubber, leaving a space in between for the center rubber and trim. The two panes and surrounding rubber were then placed on the car as a unit. I wish I could remember his route around the window, but I recall the top was last before he installed the center rubber and trim piece. And of course he had those suction cups. I helped a little in holding the glass, but with the tools he had he didn't need me much.

He was at it a long time and to be fair we still have several marks in the rubber where the hook was being used (no holes or tears, but small lines). It all seemed a VERY tight fit.
His suggestion to me for next time is to order a slightly thinner grade of glass. I don't recall the code for it. I just hope I don't have to do this again any time soon (ever, really).

Addendum (Found some notes I scribbled when glass guy came):
  • Used Presol to pre-clean surfaces
  • GOJO hand cleaner for rubber lubrication - he said when this dries it suffices as sealant; never use silicone
  • Used plastic spacers between the glass panes (at top and bottom in center to keep the two panes from hitting each other during the install)
  • Cotter pin extractor tool - this had a small ball on the end (Perhaps Dale's "hook")
  • started install at the bottom, then the side edges
  • I also have "superglue" noted, but can't read what for. I update this if I can descipher my handwriting
  • And finally, I'm almost sure he told me NOT to warm the rubber, but for the life of me I can't recall why. He didn't warm it.

Paula W
 

Took another good look at our windshield - we have a lot of those line marks in the rubber from his use of the hook tool. They would be objectionable to anyone considering show quality, which he knew we were not. We just had a broken windshield to replace. Here's where perhaps  warming the rubber would have helped, and a little more time and care as Dale suggests. (Or maybe that's where the spoon comes in too?)

BTW, I think the Superglue may have been a suggestion to seal where the rubber edges come together. We have a very teeny gap. He deliberately did not put that seam at the bottom of the center post due to the possibility of water/rust. Our original windshield had the seam midway up the passenger side. This glass person put it midway on the bottom of the driver's side.

okay - I think I'm done. :-)

Mike S
 

Are all of the tips above assuming the glass is installed from the inside of the cabin, or from the outside?  I notice the shop manual says to go from the inside and to use a rope....but it sounds like experience has found the rope is more trouble than help???

Rich Childs
 

I have installed a couple on Crosleys and numerous other vintage cars.  the technique I have also used is to install the rubber gasket on the glass, then fill the channel that will meet the body with dish soap which is then following by a length of waxed cord that will reach around the window plus about a foot extra at each end.  Set the channel over the lip of the lower windshield with the overlapping ends to the inside of the car.  then have someone maintain light and even pressure from the outside while you  slowly pull the cord while angling it toward the center of the glass.   The lip of the rubber gasket will be pulled the metal lip[ of the opening. You continue working your way around, going from one side to the other to keep it dropping in evenly.    The dish soap and the waxed cord have never failed to work for me.  If you get a bit hasty, you may find a few areas that don't clear entirely.  For those I have always used a 1/2 wide plastic spatula to slide under the lip and move laterally to clear the spot that has hung up.   As you can see here, it really is a two man job to do well.   It is easier on the Crosley because you have the center space which is bolted to the exterior chrome reveal and allows for a bit more flexibility in getting the outer surround in place and then adding the center piece.    On a large one piece window if you don't have the gasket firmly set on the glass before trying to get it in the body, it can become really difficult.  If things feel too tight as you move along, you might want to start over, instead of pushing to hared and breaking your glass.    

Good luck, 

Rich Childs

Mike S
 

Didn't Crosley try to plan on an output of 120 cars a day?  What techniques or machinery would they have had to speed up the process of installing the glass on the assembly line?  I've watched old films of the Studebaker factory installing windshields (from the inside of the cabin on early post war cars) and was amazed at how ruff they seemed to handle the glass.
Mike S 

Robert Connearney
 

I bought a 1946 Stude pickup decades ago, that had a cracked windshield. I spent a couple of hours trying to put a new one in, and it finally became apparent that it might be possible to go from the inside out. Eureka! Always wondered if I had overlooked something obvious that would have made it easier to install using the "conventional" procedure. Thanks for finally putting that question to rest!



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Mike S <miso7@...>
Date: 4/9/19 10:19 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] CD windshield install

Didn't Crosley try to plan on an output of 120 cars a day?  What techniques or machinery would they have had to speed up the process of installing the glass on the assembly line?  I've watched old films of the Studebaker factory installing windshields (from the inside of the cabin on early post war cars) and was amazed at how ruff they seemed to handle the glass.
Mike S