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6-Bolt water pump rebuild


Andy Drake
 

I have a pile of water pump cores and am getting ready to rebuild a few. I've done a large number of three or four bolt water pumps in the past, but never a six bolt. Is there any special trick to them? The construction is quite a bit different than the earlier style with the packing. I don't want to damage the seals putting them in, so there must be a preferred way. Thanks!


Butch
 

Andy,

Since we did a lot of them, I made some jigs and tools, to do the job easier and better. For just a couple, it's not worth the investment in time, to do so.

Make sure that the bores are clean and smooth, they will most likely be pitted, so use some fine sandpaper to smooth the edges, do NOT try to remove the pits.

Use plenty of grease, put the shaft up thru the newly installed bushing (which will most likely need reaming/honing, to allow the shaft to pass thru it), grease the shaft and seal thoroughly and carefully start the seal, using a small screwdriver over the end and passed the bolt hole.

Then, using the same small screwdriver, tuck the outside edges down into the liberally greased bore. Use a piece of tubing to bottom it out.

Do it again, on the next ring, then put the female VEE washer on, press it down, then the spring, then the male VEE washer, then the next seal (this one is the tough one!), then the last female VEE washer.

Now, while holding it all compressed, put the retaining cap on and crimp into the groove in the pump snout.

Simple, huh!

A little caveat, make sure that the grease/water weep hole, is clear, BEFORE you start. If it is plugged up, you can blow the cap off of the pump, while greasing it.

We always greased them, while spinning them on a drill press, to get everything seated and acquainted with each other.

Hope that this helps,

Butch

On 9/18/2020 9:25 AM, Andy Drake wrote:
I have a pile of water pump cores and am getting ready to rebuild a few. I've done a large number of three or four bolt water pumps in the past, but never a six bolt. Is there any special trick to them? The construction is quite a bit different than the earlier style with the packing. I don't want to damage the seals putting them in, so there must be a preferred way. Thanks!
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James Hudson
 

Thank you for posting this Butch, I have two that I want to rebuild and this will help a lot. As regards a pitted bore, I read somewhere-I think on this forum but I can't find it-that you could use JB-weld to fill up the pitted portions of the bore and smooth it out. Would you recommend that?-Jim


Butch
 

Jim,

Yes, we sandblasted them well and used J-B Weld to repair the bores and also the inlet and outlet spigots.

When necessary, we would sleeve the spigots with tubing and secure it and build the outside up, to make the damaged cores usable.

Butch

On 9/20/2020 12:12 PM, James Hudson wrote:
Thank you for posting this Butch, I have two that I want to rebuild and this will help a lot. As regards a pitted bore, I read somewhere-I think on this forum but I can't find it-that you could use JB-weld to fill up the pitted portions of the bore and smooth it out. Would you recommend that?-Jim
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James Hudson
 

Thank you!


Andy Drake
 

Ok, at the risk of asking a dumb question, what would you use to put that nice crimp in the retaining cap? I'd imagine there originally was a press or a tool of some sort that put the crimp indents in the right spot, but I don't really have anything like it in the toolbox. I hesitate to use pliars or something which would burr up the cap or not seat it right. 

Thanks!


tdellacamera01@...
 

I use a punch 


On Sep 21, 2020, at 9:27 AM, Andy Drake <drakeap@...> wrote:

Ok, at the risk of asking a dumb question, what would you use to put that nice crimp in the retaining cap? I'd imagine there originally was a press or a tool of some sort that put the crimp indents in the right spot, but I don't really have anything like it in the toolbox. I hesitate to use pliars or something which would burr up the cap or not seat it right. 

Thanks!


Butch
 

Andy,

We are hi tech here. We support the "snout" with a board (we actually had a semicircular jig) and used a small cold chisel to crimp it on, in about 3 to 5 places. Make sure that you crimp it into the groove on the pump.

Butch

On 9/21/2020 9:16 AM, Andy Drake wrote:
Ok, at the risk of asking a dumb question, what would you use to put that nice crimp in the retaining cap? I'd imagine there originally was a press or a tool of some sort that put the crimp indents in the right spot, but I don't really have anything like it in the toolbox. I hesitate to use pliars or something which would burr up the cap or not seat it right.

Thanks!
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Andy Drake
 

Thanks everyone! I appreciate it. I was over thinking it...surely MAC or SnapOn would sell you an $89 single use tool to crimp on caps to water pumps, right?

I am using Lubriplate Water Pump grease -- that seem right? I used to use marine bearing grease, but switched based on a recommendation to use waterpump grease as it's formulated differently. This is not the grease for Model A's (water soluable grease), it's the grease meant for bushings or bearings exposed to water.