Date   
Re: Crosley In a Boat?

Spock Arnold
 

Is it a 2 cyl?  I have heard of a few that were done.  Of course there were several 4 cyl marine applications including several types of racers

On Jun 12, 2018 8:59 PM, PCeditorpro <pceditorpro@...> wrote:
So I was cleaning out a old building used for storage at a boat yard that closed back in the 1980s or 1990s. Finding out anything about this yard has been a struggle no one knows anything. So we opened a door and found an entire room full of motors. Everything from inboards to outboards and gas to diesel most are in great shape. We pulled one of the Honda out poured in some gas and it fired right up. The only markings I was able to find on the plane brown box was "crosley -1940" on it. It's rusty and the top of the distributor was hit with something but other then that it looks complete. It also has what looks to be a heat exchanger on it. Now I know nothing about this engine but I have been working in a boat yard for 7 years. I would like to either restore this and build a small wooden boat to go with it or sell it to someone that knows more about this engine that will give it a good home. I don't want a piece of history to just be left behind and thrown out. Any knowledge would be helpful thanks.

Re: Crosley In a Boat?

PCeditorpro
 

It is a 4 cylinder. I do know the yard specialized in commercial work like tugs and fishing boats.

Re: Generator Motor Conversion

wpaxt@...
 

Butch,

This is really interesting stuff.  So I'm clear, I can use the existing tower shaft as long as I re-time the camshaft by one tooth.  So which way to I do that retiming?  Forgive my ignorance but do I move one tooth forward or backward?

Bill

Re: Generator Motor Conversion

wpaxt@...
 

And by the way, to all of you guys who responded, I really appreciate all of your help and advice.

Bill

Re: Generator Motor Conversion

Butch
 

Bill,

As I recall, you retard it, but I've not messed with one for several years.

Butch

On 6/13/2018 10:16 AM, wpaxt via Groups.Io wrote:
Butch,

This is really interesting stuff.  So I'm clear, I can use the existing tower shaft as long as I re-time the camshaft by one tooth.  So which way to I do that retiming?  Forgive my ignorance but do I move one tooth forward or backward?

Bill


Virus-free. www.avast.com

Re: Generator Motor Conversion

wpaxt@...
 

Thanks, Butch.  I'll give it a go once I get the motor off.

Will keep you posted.

Bill

Re: Crosley In a Boat?

PCeditorpro
 

I grab a few pictures before my phone died on me.

Re: Crosley In a Boat?

graywanderer.az51
 

Crosleys engines were used in inboard Aerojet setups. I have one with the cradle and prop set up. Some outbounds were made with the 4 cylinder engine vertical.  If I remember they had the Homelite name.




http://crosleyautoclub.com/EngineTree/Crosley_Eng_Tree-3.html


Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device

Re: Crosley In a Boat?

PCeditorpro
 

So I'm going to ask saying the internals are in good shape and I just need a distributor, carb, and new gaskets. Plus a transmission, stuffing box, and driveshaft how much would this cost me to fix up and use?

Re: Crosley In a Boat?

parkhunter@...
 


Here’s the parts vendor page on the Crosley Auto Club website...

http://crosleyautoclub.com/PartsSuppliers.html

The top three listings - Service, Edwards, and Yankee - can get you any engine part you need, surprisingly affordably. The boat-specific stuff will be harder, but ask around on this website. 

I’ve seen picture of neat little wood racing boats powered by Crosley engines. You’ve got a treasure there!

Park

Re: Crosley In a Boat?

PCeditorpro
 

Yea I found pictures of those about an hour ago and I want to build one. I'm not a huge wood worker but I might need to learn  how to build a small wooden boat to put it in. Once I get a fly wheel I can figure out if something newer will fit transmission wise. Are these easy to work on? I don't have a lot of experience tearing down and rebuilding like this.

Re: Rear axle nut tightness

Butch
 

Dave & Gang,

From page 9 in the service manual (at least the edition that I'm using), 5/8" X 11 or 18, 880 - 1300 inch pounds or 73 - 110 foot pounds.

I always "sneak up on it", initially taking it up to about 80 FT. Pounds, then slowly advancing until I can install the cotter key.

Make SURE that you do NOT install the axle key, until AFTER the drum is pushed back on to the axle, absolutely NOT before! I'm dealing with a cracked drum/hub right now, in my service bay. The most common cause it, inserting the key in the axle slot, then pushing the drum on. The drum sleeves are not all that substantial to begin with, improper installation is an almost sure way to break them.

Also, make sure that the axle and hub "sleeve" area, are clean and dry, no oil or Locktite!

Hope that this helps someone,

Butch

On 6/8/2018 11:02 AM, David Reina via Groups.Io wrote:
Thanks again Butch. My friend was helping when we got to this part of completing the brake job and he was thinking that the rules of adjusting the front drums applied. I know that the back wheel bearings are adjusted with shims behind the backing plate. I’ll get on it today and try tightening it to a slot position.

Regards,
Dave

David Reina
79 Guernsey Street
Brooklyn, NY 11222
347-482-4657





On Jun 7, 2018, at 7:56 PM, Butch via Groups.Io <butch46988=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Dave,

I've got a spec here, somewhere. I'll do some searching for it.

"You tighten to snug and back off to the nearest hole. Other wise it will run hot."

INCORRECT! This holds the drum/hub to the axle, nothing to do with an adjustment or running hot.

You "approach the slot", once it's tight, you absolutely do NOT want to back it off, without removing the drum and starting over.

Butch

On 6/7/2018 6:00 PM, David Reina via Groups.Io wrote:
Hi Gang,

How tight should the rear axle nuts be tightened to. Its a castellated nut soda we go as tight as we can and try to line up a slot for the cotter pin, or do we tighten and then back off to the nearest cotter pin slot? I’m working on a 47 CC Sedan.

Thanks,
Dave Reina
Brooklyn, NY


Crosley Special at a Hill Climb

Gene Smith
 

Nice video of a Crosley special at a hill climb. Anybody recognize the body? So pretty!
~Gene Smith~
missing having a car just for fun, in Houston

Re: Rear axle nut tightness

David Reina
 

Wow Butch. More really helpful information. I did install a drum yesterday with the key in place. Hope I didn’t crack the hub. My son helped check on the internet whether or not to lube the taper of the axle and the hole in the drum. In the end we cleaned them up with acetone and installed. However I did do the key incorrectly. I might pop it off again and install the key as you describe.

Regards,
Dave

David Reina Designs, Inc.
245 Kent Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11249
phone: 718 486-0262
fax: 718 599-7857

On Jun 15, 2018, at 10:57 AM, Butch via Groups.Io <butch46988=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Dave & Gang,

From page 9 in the service manual (at least the edition that I'm using), 5/8" X 11 or 18, 880 - 1300 inch pounds or 73 - 110 foot pounds.

I always "sneak up on it", initially taking it up to about 80 FT. Pounds, then slowly advancing until I can install the cotter key.

Make SURE that you do NOT install the axle key, until AFTER the drum is pushed back on to the axle, absolutely NOT before! I'm dealing with a cracked drum/hub right now, in my service bay. The most common cause it, inserting the key in the axle slot, then pushing the drum on. The drum sleeves are not all that substantial to begin with, improper installation is an almost sure way to break them.

Also, make sure that the axle and hub "sleeve" area, are clean and dry, no oil or Locktite!

Hope that this helps someone,

Butch

On 6/8/2018 11:02 AM, David Reina via Groups.Io wrote:
Thanks again Butch. My friend was helping when we got to this part of completing the brake job and he was thinking that the rules of adjusting the front drums applied. I know that the back wheel bearings are adjusted with shims behind the backing plate. I’ll get on it today and try tightening it to a slot position.

Regards,
Dave

David Reina
79 Guernsey Street
Brooklyn, NY 11222
347-482-4657





On Jun 7, 2018, at 7:56 PM, Butch via Groups.Io <butch46988=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Dave,

I've got a spec here, somewhere. I'll do some searching for it.

"You tighten to snug and back off to the nearest hole. Other wise it will run hot."

INCORRECT! This holds the drum/hub to the axle, nothing to do with an adjustment or running hot.

You "approach the slot", once it's tight, you absolutely do NOT want to back it off, without removing the drum and starting over.

Butch

On 6/7/2018 6:00 PM, David Reina via Groups.Io wrote:
Hi Gang,

How tight should the rear axle nuts be tightened to. Its a castellated nut soda we go as tight as we can and try to line up a slot for the cotter pin, or do we tighten and then back off to the nearest cotter pin slot? I’m working on a 47 CC Sedan.

Thanks,
Dave Reina
Brooklyn, NY




Re: Rear axle nut tightness

Butch
 

David,

I don't know if it would be better to remove and reinstall or not. If it's going to crack, my guess is that it would be immediate at installation.

It might be best, to remove & inspect, then handle accordingly. However, sometimes, "ignorance is bliss".

Butch

On 6/15/2018 12:18 PM, David Reina via Groups.Io wrote:
Wow Butch. More really helpful information. I did install a drum yesterday with the key in place. Hope I didn’t crack the hub. My son helped check on the internet whether or not to lube the taper of the axle and the hole in the drum. In the end we cleaned them up with acetone and installed. However I did do the key incorrectly. I might pop it off again and install the key as you describe.

Regards,
Dave

David Reina Designs, Inc.
245 Kent Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11249
phone: 718 486-0262
fax: 718 599-7857



On Jun 15, 2018, at 10:57 AM, Butch via Groups.Io <butch46988=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Dave & Gang,

From page 9 in the service manual (at least the edition that I'm using), 5/8" X 11 or 18, 880 - 1300 inch pounds or 73 - 110 foot pounds.

I always "sneak up on it", initially taking it up to about 80 FT. Pounds, then slowly advancing until I can install the cotter key.

Make SURE that you do NOT install the axle key, until AFTER the drum is pushed back on to the axle, absolutely NOT before! I'm dealing with a cracked drum/hub right now, in my service bay. The most common cause it, inserting the key in the axle slot, then pushing the drum on. The drum sleeves are not all that substantial to begin with, improper installation is an almost sure way to break them.

Also, make sure that the axle and hub "sleeve" area, are clean and dry, no oil or Locktite!

Hope that this helps someone,

Butch

On 6/8/2018 11:02 AM, David Reina via Groups.Io wrote:
Thanks again Butch. My friend was helping when we got to this part of completing the brake job and he was thinking that the rules of adjusting the front drums applied. I know that the back wheel bearings are adjusted with shims behind the backing plate. I’ll get on it today and try tightening it to a slot position.

Regards,
Dave

David Reina
79 Guernsey Street
Brooklyn, NY 11222
347-482-4657





On Jun 7, 2018, at 7:56 PM, Butch via Groups.Io <butch46988=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Dave,

I've got a spec here, somewhere. I'll do some searching for it.

"You tighten to snug and back off to the nearest hole. Other wise it will run hot."

INCORRECT! This holds the drum/hub to the axle, nothing to do with an adjustment or running hot.

You "approach the slot", once it's tight, you absolutely do NOT want to back it off, without removing the drum and starting over.

Butch

On 6/7/2018 6:00 PM, David Reina via Groups.Io wrote:
Hi Gang,

How tight should the rear axle nuts be tightened to. Its a castellated nut soda we go as tight as we can and try to line up a slot for the cotter pin, or do we tighten and then back off to the nearest cotter pin slot? I’m working on a 47 CC Sedan.

Thanks,
Dave Reina
Brooklyn, NY


Permatex or none..

Steve Perry
 

I’m assembling the engine in my 1951 Super Sports. I was wondering if it was proper to put Permatex on both sides of the thin paper gasket that goes between the cast iron cylinder/head and the aluminum crankshaft housing below..
thanks in advance..
steve

Re: Permatex or none..

dale@servicemotors.net
 

That would be fine to do..


On Jun 15, 2018, at 7:45 PM, Steve Perry <sperryfish@...> wrote:

I’m assembling the engine in my 1951 Super Sports. I was wondering if it was proper to put Permatex on both sides of the thin paper gasket that goes between the cast iron cylinder/head and the aluminum crankshaft housing below..
thanks in advance..
steve

Re: Permatex or none..

Steve Perry
 

Thanks Dale..



On Jun 15, 2018, at 9:52 PM, dale@... <Dale@...> wrote:

That would be fine to do..


On Jun 15, 2018, at 7:45 PM, Steve Perry <sperryfish@...> wrote:

I’m assembling the engine in my 1951 Super Sports. I was wondering if it was proper to put Permatex on both sides of the thin paper gasket that goes between the cast iron cylinder/head and the aluminum crankshaft housing below..
thanks in advance..
steve

Re: Permatex or none..

dale@servicemotors.net
 

You bet


On Jun 16, 2018, at 1:09 AM, Steve Perry <sperryfish@...> wrote:

Thanks Dale..



On Jun 15, 2018, at 9:52 PM, dale@... <Dale@...> wrote:

That would be fine to do..


On Jun 15, 2018, at 7:45 PM, Steve Perry <sperryfish@...> wrote:

I’m assembling the engine in my 1951 Super Sports. I was wondering if it was proper to put Permatex on both sides of the thin paper gasket that goes between the cast iron cylinder/head and the aluminum crankshaft housing below..
thanks in advance..
steve

For Sale: Cast and Tin Engine Plus Transmission - $100 - Houston, TX

Jim Bollman
 

2 Engines - one of them is a tin block, both appear to be stuck 
1 Transmission 
2 boxes go with them includes, distributor, generators, starter, clutch assembly including the flywheel, manifolds. 

$100 takes it all no separate sales

"Matthew J. Heumann" <matthew.j.heumann "At" gmail.com>

Mat is not a member of the Gang so contact him directly.