Date   

Re: COBRA Block

Robert Connearney
 



The Crosley engine was designed by Lloyd Taylor; Google him (and maybe add the word Crosley or engine). There is quite a bit of background  info, but I'm not sure if there is anything detailing specific construction.techniques. I did see mention of using a hydrogen furnace, whatever that is. Apparently the design objective was to get high output at minimum weight, for military/aircraft use. Thin wall casting techniques were not developed at the time, so the thinner fabricated steel assemblies were not only much lighter, but were more easily cooled, allowing higher compression ratios. Note that the cylinder head is integral with the block, and the valves are in-line, so they can be dropped out through the cylinder. If a twin cam with a hemi or pent-roof design is intended, large OD valve guides are necessary, and must be removed "out the top", prior to dropping the valves. Also note that the crankcase is an aluminum casting, which I believe can be a lot stiffer than steel, for a comparative weight. 

I believe Mercedes has used steel fabrications, at least on their Grand Prix and sports racing car engines of the fifties. Also, large diesels (e.g., marine and generators), so there may be some internet info on these.

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "bruce.derenski via Groups.Io" <bruce.derenski@...>
Date: 2/16/20 8:44 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: [Crosley-Gang] COBRA Block

Crosley Fans,

I work for a contractor that is interested in innovative ways of making an engine block, specifically methods that don't require casting. I immediately thought of the COBRA. Are there any specific members on here who are knowledgeable about exactly HOW Crosley manufactured that engine? Any books, articles or publications would be helpful, too. So would seeing one of these engines close-up. I live in Florida, so a local source is best, but I can travel. Also, some questions for anyone who has disassembled a COBRA: Does the COBRA block look any different than a CIBA? In other words, can you look at a COBRA block and see how it was made? I'm trying to figure out if it's worthwhile to get my hands on an old COBRA block for the purpose of examining it, and perhaps even breaking it down into its original stamped components.

Thanks in advance. You folks are great.


Re: COBRA Block

James Dlapa
 

Bruce. If you can get your hands on “American machinist magazine” dates August 28, 1947 there is a great article in manufacturing processes of the Cobra engine. If not 
The October 2019 issued of the “tin block times” which is the west coast Crosley clubs publication reprinted the article. It is a very interesting read. Reach out to either Tim Foster or Rick Alexander to see about getting a copy. 

On Sun, Feb 16, 2020 at 6:03 AM Spock Arnold via Groups.Io <tmkldwwj=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Bruce;
     I don't know where you live in Florida, however, this Saturday the 22nd, the Florida Region is having a meet in Sarasota.  If you go on the Clubs Facebook page (Crosley Automobiles Fun Little Cars) and make a request, I am sure someone will have a tin block they can bring along. Also if you look at the club web page under Crosley Engine family Tree, you may find much of the information you are looking for.
                    Dave Anspach 

On Sunday, February 16, 2020, 08:44:30 AM EST, bruce.derenski via Groups.Io <bruce.derenski=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:


Crosley Fans,

I work for a contractor that is interested in innovative ways of making an engine block, specifically methods that don't require casting. I immediately thought of the COBRA. Are there any specific members on here who are knowledgeable about exactly HOW Crosley manufactured that engine? Any books, articles or publications would be helpful, too. So would seeing one of these engines close-up. I live in Florida, so a local source is best, but I can travel. Also, some questions for anyone who has disassembled a COBRA: Does the COBRA block look any different than a CIBA? In other words, can you look at a COBRA block and see how it was made? I'm trying to figure out if it's worthwhile to get my hands on an old COBRA block for the purpose of examining it, and perhaps even breaking it down into its original stamped components.

Thanks in advance. You folks are great.


Re: COBRA Block

Spock Arnold
 

Bruce;
     I don't know where you live in Florida, however, this Saturday the 22nd, the Florida Region is having a meet in Sarasota.  If you go on the Clubs Facebook page (Crosley Automobiles Fun Little Cars) and make a request, I am sure someone will have a tin block they can bring along. Also if you look at the club web page under Crosley Engine family Tree, you may find much of the information you are looking for.
                    Dave Anspach 

On Sunday, February 16, 2020, 08:44:30 AM EST, bruce.derenski via Groups.Io <bruce.derenski@...> wrote:


Crosley Fans,

I work for a contractor that is interested in innovative ways of making an engine block, specifically methods that don't require casting. I immediately thought of the COBRA. Are there any specific members on here who are knowledgeable about exactly HOW Crosley manufactured that engine? Any books, articles or publications would be helpful, too. So would seeing one of these engines close-up. I live in Florida, so a local source is best, but I can travel. Also, some questions for anyone who has disassembled a COBRA: Does the COBRA block look any different than a CIBA? In other words, can you look at a COBRA block and see how it was made? I'm trying to figure out if it's worthwhile to get my hands on an old COBRA block for the purpose of examining it, and perhaps even breaking it down into its original stamped components.

Thanks in advance. You folks are great.


Re: COBRA Block

Jim Bollman
 

Our club website is a good place to start your research.

Lots of members of the Gang have experience with the CoBra, some even have running examples in cars. Bad blocks for disassembly should be fairly easy to get, Good blocks for making a running engines a bit harder. The inside of the engine is basically the same as the CIBA, so if you're interested in that, reprints of the service manual is available from our vendors. Once you actually see a CoBra they are easy to spot.

I'm sure others will jump in but feel free to ask more questions after you have read the link above.

Jim...

On Feb 16, 2020, at 8:44 AM, bruce.derenski via Groups.Io <bruce.derenski@...> wrote:

Crosley Fans,

I work for a contractor that is interested in innovative ways of making an engine block, specifically methods that don't require casting. I immediately thought of the COBRA. Are there any specific members on here who are knowledgeable about exactly HOW Crosley manufactured that engine? Any books, articles or publications would be helpful, too. So would seeing one of these engines close-up. I live in Florida, so a local source is best, but I can travel. Also, some questions for anyone who has disassembled a COBRA: Does the COBRA block look any different than a CIBA? In other words, can you look at a COBRA block and see how it was made? I'm trying to figure out if it's worthwhile to get my hands on an old COBRA block for the purpose of examining it, and perhaps even breaking it down into its original stamped components.

Thanks in advance. You folks are great.


COBRA Block

Bruce Derenski
 

Crosley Fans,

I work for a contractor that is interested in innovative ways of making an engine block, specifically methods that don't require casting. I immediately thought of the COBRA. Are there any specific members on here who are knowledgeable about exactly HOW Crosley manufactured that engine? Any books, articles or publications would be helpful, too. So would seeing one of these engines close-up. I live in Florida, so a local source is best, but I can travel. Also, some questions for anyone who has disassembled a COBRA: Does the COBRA block look any different than a CIBA? In other words, can you look at a COBRA block and see how it was made? I'm trying to figure out if it's worthwhile to get my hands on an old COBRA block for the purpose of examining it, and perhaps even breaking it down into its original stamped components.

Thanks in advance. You folks are great.


Re: Brake Spring mystery

Randy C
 

The genuine Crosley optional right side tail light had only a single filament bulb so no stop light in it. At least that is the way it was on the 1948 station wagon and 1947 sedan I owned back in the 1960's.

   Randy


Re: Brake Spring mystery

Paula W
 

In case it matters - this car has only the one tail light and in there is only one bulb.
I appreciate all the comments. I have to (learn to) check for grounds and also get under that part of the car myself to see how that bake light switch operates and where that spring should go.

I did find one old post which may not be relevant to my situation (no answer jumps out), but it suggests the switch itself may benefit from maintenance.
http://crosleyautoclub.com/CrosleyGarage/Chassis/brake_light_switch.htm


Re: Brake Spring mystery

L.E. Hardee
 

Question 1 sounds like a bulb ground problem.  When lights are on, the brake light ground through the light circuit but no ground without the tail lights on.  Kinda weird but I have seen it before especially on trailers.


On Fri, Feb 14, 2020 at 9:05 PM Paula W <paula_whitney@...> wrote:
Wow - I should have noticed the brake light stopped working.
However -
1 - Is it odd that when the car lights are "on", the tail light brightens when the brake pedal is pushed, but doesn't light at all when the lights are "off"? If the circuit diagram has an answer (figure 33 page 48, plus a magnifying glass) I'm not seeing it. Is that all related to the broken spring?

2 - Is a replacement spring a Crosley part or should I scout hardware stores?


Re: Brake Spring mystery

Paula W
 

Wow - I should have noticed the brake light stopped working.
However -
1 - Is it odd that when the car lights are "on", the tail light brightens when the brake pedal is pushed, but doesn't light at all when the lights are "off"? If the circuit diagram has an answer (figure 33 page 48, plus a magnifying glass) I'm not seeing it. Is that all related to the broken spring?

2 - Is a replacement spring a Crosley part or should I scout hardware stores?


Re: Brake Spring mystery

 

That is the brake light switch spring. Mine is broken the same way, but was still attached to the switch on the frame. 


On Feb 14, 2020, at 6:36 PM, Paula W <paula_whitney@...> wrote:


There is a spring that I found resting on the frame under the car by the brake pedal area. Attached is a photo of the spring (broken) as well as a photo of page 36, figure 28 in the Crosley Manual which I believe has a clue.
My guess is that this spring is in fact what looks like a spring in figure 28 that hooks from where the brake pedal pull rod ("D") attaches to the arm of the brake pedal. The other end seems to go off somewhere non-specific.
Our mechanic was under our car today trying to figure out what the spring is supposed to do and where it hooked in, but could not locate two points of attachment.

Can anyone shed any light?  Does anyone have a picture of it correctly installed?

Attachments:


Re: Brake Spring mystery

Spock Arnold
 

I think that one attaches to your brake light sensor . Either that or it is the pedal return spring and the other is for the sensor.  Sorry no CC s here just VC s, a FOR, and a Pre War.  

On Feb 14, 2020 6:36 PM, Paula W <paula_whitney@...> wrote:

There is a spring that I found resting on the frame under the car by the brake pedal area. Attached is a photo of the spring (broken) as well as a photo of page 36, figure 28 in the Crosley Manual which I believe has a clue.
My guess is that this spring is in fact what looks like a spring in figure 28 that hooks from where the brake pedal pull rod ("D") attaches to the arm of the brake pedal. The other end seems to go off somewhere non-specific.
Our mechanic was under our car today trying to figure out what the spring is supposed to do and where it hooked in, but could not locate two points of attachment.

Can anyone shed any light?  Does anyone have a picture of it correctly installed?


Re: Brake Spring mystery

Steve
 

The brake light switch hooks on the frame cross-member.  The spring should have a hook on both ends.  There is limited slide action on the switch, so it needs to spring to avoid over extending the pull on the switch.

 

From: Crosley-Gang@groups.io [mailto:Crosley-Gang@groups.io] On Behalf Of Paula W
Sent: Friday, February 14, 2020 5:37 PM
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: [Crosley-Gang] Brake Spring mystery

 


There is a spring that I found resting on the frame under the car by the brake pedal area. Attached is a photo of the spring (broken) as well as a photo of page 36, figure 28 in the Crosley Manual which I believe has a clue.
My guess is that this spring is in fact what looks like a spring in figure 28 that hooks from where the brake pedal pull rod ("D") attaches to the arm of the brake pedal. The other end seems to go off somewhere non-specific.
Our mechanic was under our car today trying to figure out what the spring is supposed to do and where it hooked in, but could not locate two points of attachment.

Can anyone shed any light?  Does anyone have a picture of it correctly installed?


Re: Brake Spring mystery

Steve
 

I believe that is the spring that attaches to the brake light switch.

-Steve M.

 

From: Crosley-Gang@groups.io [mailto:Crosley-Gang@groups.io] On Behalf Of Paula W
Sent: Friday, February 14, 2020 5:37 PM
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: [Crosley-Gang] Brake Spring mystery

 


There is a spring that I found resting on the frame under the car by the brake pedal area. Attached is a photo of the spring (broken) as well as a photo of page 36, figure 28 in the Crosley Manual which I believe has a clue.
My guess is that this spring is in fact what looks like a spring in figure 28 that hooks from where the brake pedal pull rod ("D") attaches to the arm of the brake pedal. The other end seems to go off somewhere non-specific.
Our mechanic was under our car today trying to figure out what the spring is supposed to do and where it hooked in, but could not locate two points of attachment.

Can anyone shed any light?  Does anyone have a picture of it correctly installed?


Brake Spring mystery

Paula W
 


There is a spring that I found resting on the frame under the car by the brake pedal area. Attached is a photo of the spring (broken) as well as a photo of page 36, figure 28 in the Crosley Manual which I believe has a clue.
My guess is that this spring is in fact what looks like a spring in figure 28 that hooks from where the brake pedal pull rod ("D") attaches to the arm of the brake pedal. The other end seems to go off somewhere non-specific.
Our mechanic was under our car today trying to figure out what the spring is supposed to do and where it hooked in, but could not locate two points of attachment.

Can anyone shed any light?  Does anyone have a picture of it correctly installed?


Re: Reproduction Flywheel Cover

 

Me too!


On Feb 14, 2020, at 8:04 AM, parkhunter@... wrote:



I’ll certainly be interested if/when you start to sell these. In my experience, the covers are hard to find. 


- Park


Re: Reproduction Flywheel Cover

parkhunter@...
 

I’ll certainly be interested if/when you start to sell these. In my experience, the covers are hard to find. 


- Park


Re: Lost Another Old Time Member - Jim Oliver Passed

Gabriel Haddad
 

Condolences to Jim's family.  He was fun to visit with at the nationals.


On Wed, Feb 12, 2020, 3:37 PM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
Jim Oliver passed last Friday. He was at many National and Regional CAC shows over the years. His 47 Red Roundside was a favorite of mine, but his VC with a clear hood was also a show favorite.

https://www.maurerfuneralhome.com/obituary/james-oliver?fh_id=15812

Jim...


Lost Another Old Time Member - Jim Oliver Passed

Jim Bollman
 

Jim Oliver passed last Friday. He was at many National and Regional CAC shows over the years. His 47 Red Roundside was a favorite of mine, but his VC with a clear hood was also a show favorite.

https://www.maurerfuneralhome.com/obituary/james-oliver?fh_id=15812

Jim...


Re: Reproduction Flywheel Cover

David Reina
 

Hi Mike,

Nice work!  I’ve also tried reproducing a couple of items over the years.  At one point I made a few rear axle stabilizer bars for Hot Shot and Super Sports.  Then a few years ago I made a bunch of reproduction castings of the Motorola radio front for my friend Jak.  I know this work is all labor of love so thanks.

Regards,
Dave

David Reina Designs, Inc.
245 Kent Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11249
P: 718-486-0262
F: 718-599-7857



On Feb 11, 2020, at 6:30 PM, Mike S <miso7@...> wrote:

A few more parts made today.  Will work up a welding jig tomorrow.  Got interrupted by another project when a friend had me work on his reenacting machine gun.... <new parts.jpg>


Re: Reproduction Flywheel Cover

Mike S
 

When we bought our '48 this past June, the cover was missing.  I was told that most of them got thrown a way back in the day and they were hard to find.  Fred loaned one to me to use as a pattern so I could make one.  I thought while I was at it, I would see if multiple copies could be made reasonably.  I retired in December and I enjoy metal working.  I did find an original cover about a month ago, so it basically took 6 months to find one, if that speaks to how rare they are.