Date   

Re: Valve clearance

Butch
 

My general practice is, use the mid spec as my low limit and add 0.002 as my high limit. Loose valves are noisy, tight valves burn.

As negligent as many Crosley owners are about maintenance, error on the loose side. The increase in noise and the decrease in performance is negligible, in the overall scheme of Crosley.

Butch

On 2/18/2020 4:48 PM, Steve wrote:
While I like the idea of having them at spec, I am reminded of my Ford Pinto.  At 30,000 miles the dealer provided the recommended service and adjusted the valve clearance. At 39,000 I had burned valves and had to replace the head.  The next Ford mechanic I spoke with said, "Let 'em rattle."  Moral of the story, a little noise is better than no noise. I think I would err on the high side of the spec.  I'll let Barry, Butch or Dale be a higher authority on this 



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S7 edge, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "seb fontana via Groups.Io" <speedoo51@...>
Date: 2/18/20 3:20 PM (GMT-06:00)
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Valve clearance

I lost a .015 shim once and it got noisy; while you at at it I would put them in spec.
_._,_.


Re: Valve clearance

Steve
 

While I like the idea of having them at spec, I am reminded of my Ford Pinto.  At 30,000 miles the dealer provided the recommended service and adjusted the valve clearance. At 39,000 I had burned valves and had to replace the head.  The next Ford mechanic I spoke with said, "Let 'em rattle."  Moral of the story, a little noise is better than no noise. I think I would err on the high side of the spec.  I'll let Barry, Butch or Dale be a higher authority on this 



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S7 edge, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "seb fontana via Groups.Io" <speedoo51@...>
Date: 2/18/20 3:20 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Valve clearance

I lost a .015 shim once and it got noisy; while you at at it I would put them in spec.


Re: Valve clearance

seb fontana
 

I lost a .015 shim once and it got noisy; while you at at it I would put them in spec.


Re: Valve clearance

crosleyshortsport
 

The first thing to know is the Valve positions. From the front to back is, exhaust, intake, intake, exhaust, exhaust, intake, intake, exhaust.
Valve clearance should be : 
Intake, .005 - .006 cold
Exhaust .007 - .009 cold

On Mon, Feb 17, 2020, 4:58 PM Andy Farley <farleya1@...> wrote:
I just finished measuring my valve clearance. I have two exhaust valves at .012 and one intake valve at .009. All other valves are in spec.  Just wondering if this is really bad and would it make them noisy. I'm going to shim them anyway,  just wondering if I can expect the valves to be quieter.


Re: Recommendation needed for carburetor purchase

PATRICIA GRITTI
 

A Carter WO carb is also used in early Jeeps. Wondering whether the Jeep WO can be converted for use on Crosleys.
The Jeep carbs are readily available.
Don

Sent from my Verizon Motorola Smartphone


Re: Fuel Pump Installation

PATRICIA GRITTI
 

You are correct Tilden. Several months ago I installed an inline fuel pump in my VC. Was trying to improve hard starting. Now am reading that an inline fuel pump should not pump through the mechanical pump. Will try to do better next time.
Don

Sent from my Verizon Motorola Smartphone

On Jan 19, 2020 5:42 PM, Donald <donald-gritti@...> wrote:
You are correct tilden. Several months ago I added an online fuel pump to my VC. Was trying to improve hard starting. Now am reading an online fuel pump should not feed through the mechanical pump! DUH! Will try to do the job right next time.
Don

Sent from my Verizon Motorola Smartphone


Re: Fuel Pump Installation

PATRICIA GRITTI
 

You are correct tilden. Several months ago I added an online fuel pump to my VC. Was trying to improve hard starting. Now am reading an online fuel pump should not feed through the mechanical pump! DUH! Will try to do the job right next time.
Don

Sent from my Verizon Motorola Smartphone


Re: Recommendation needed for carburetor purchase

crosleyshortsport
 

Thank you Jim


On Mon, Feb 17, 2020, 6:07 PM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
Jeff only knows how to use his phone. Here is a pointer to our vendor list. The first 3 are the biggest parts suppliers.


Jim...

On Feb 17, 2020, at 5:46 PM, crosleyshortsport <crosleyshortsport@...> wrote:

Here are some suppliers of Crosley parts

On Mon, Feb 17, 2020, 5:11 PM Tilden Drinkard <TILDENLD@...> wrote:
I need a new Carter carb for my newly purchased 1952 Station Wagon. I need a recommendation for a new or rebuild purveyor.

Thanx, Skip D 


<20200217_174450.jpg>


Re: Recommendation needed for carburetor purchase

Jim Bollman
 

Jeff only knows how to use his phone. Here is a pointer to our vendor list. The first 3 are the biggest parts suppliers.


Jim...

On Feb 17, 2020, at 5:46 PM, crosleyshortsport <crosleyshortsport@...> wrote:

Here are some suppliers of Crosley parts

On Mon, Feb 17, 2020, 5:11 PM Tilden Drinkard <TILDENLD@...> wrote:
I need a new Carter carb for my newly purchased 1952 Station Wagon. I need a recommendation for a new or rebuild purveyor.

Thanx, Skip D 


<20200217_174450.jpg>


Re: Recommendation needed for carburetor purchase

crosleyshortsport
 

Here are some suppliers of Crosley parts


On Mon, Feb 17, 2020, 5:11 PM Tilden Drinkard <TILDENLD@...> wrote:
I need a new Carter carb for my newly purchased 1952 Station Wagon. I need a recommendation for a new or rebuild purveyor.

Thanx, Skip D 


Recommendation needed for carburetor purchase

 

I need a new Carter carb for my newly purchased 1952 Station Wagon. I need a recommendation for a new or rebuild purveyor.

Thanx, Skip D 


Valve clearance

Andy Farley
 

I just finished measuring my valve clearance. I have two exhaust valves at .012 and one intake valve at .009. All other valves are in spec.  Just wondering if this is really bad and would it make them noisy. I'm going to shim them anyway,  just wondering if I can expect the valves to be quieter.


Re: Brake Spring mystery

crosleyshortsport
 

Paula,  You can certainly find a similar spring at a hardware store. That brake light switch is one of the toughest parts to see and get at. The grounding issue is typically going to be at the housing as it attaches to the body. Pull the tail light housing off and be sure you have clean bare metal on the body and the housing. Many times a restoration gets done beatifully and then all the parts get put back together and the grounding points get forgotten. Or the restoration gets old and corrosion starts at the grounding points. 


On Fri, Feb 14, 2020, 11:19 PM Randy C <nsuteam71@...> wrote:
   The genuine Crosley optional right side tail light had only a single
filament bulb so no stop light in it. At least that is the way it was on
the 1948 station wagon and 1947 sedan I owned back in the 1960's.

    Randy





Re: COBRA Block

Robert Connearney
 



The Crosley engine was designed by Lloyd Taylor; Google him (and maybe add the word Crosley or engine). There is quite a bit of background  info, but I'm not sure if there is anything detailing specific construction.techniques. I did see mention of using a hydrogen furnace, whatever that is. Apparently the design objective was to get high output at minimum weight, for military/aircraft use. Thin wall casting techniques were not developed at the time, so the thinner fabricated steel assemblies were not only much lighter, but were more easily cooled, allowing higher compression ratios. Note that the cylinder head is integral with the block, and the valves are in-line, so they can be dropped out through the cylinder. If a twin cam with a hemi or pent-roof design is intended, large OD valve guides are necessary, and must be removed "out the top", prior to dropping the valves. Also note that the crankcase is an aluminum casting, which I believe can be a lot stiffer than steel, for a comparative weight. 

I believe Mercedes has used steel fabrications, at least on their Grand Prix and sports racing car engines of the fifties. Also, large diesels (e.g., marine and generators), so there may be some internet info on these.

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "bruce.derenski via Groups.Io" <bruce.derenski@...>
Date: 2/16/20 8:44 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: [Crosley-Gang] COBRA Block

Crosley Fans,

I work for a contractor that is interested in innovative ways of making an engine block, specifically methods that don't require casting. I immediately thought of the COBRA. Are there any specific members on here who are knowledgeable about exactly HOW Crosley manufactured that engine? Any books, articles or publications would be helpful, too. So would seeing one of these engines close-up. I live in Florida, so a local source is best, but I can travel. Also, some questions for anyone who has disassembled a COBRA: Does the COBRA block look any different than a CIBA? In other words, can you look at a COBRA block and see how it was made? I'm trying to figure out if it's worthwhile to get my hands on an old COBRA block for the purpose of examining it, and perhaps even breaking it down into its original stamped components.

Thanks in advance. You folks are great.


Re: COBRA Block

James Dlapa
 

Bruce. If you can get your hands on “American machinist magazine” dates August 28, 1947 there is a great article in manufacturing processes of the Cobra engine. If not 
The October 2019 issued of the “tin block times” which is the west coast Crosley clubs publication reprinted the article. It is a very interesting read. Reach out to either Tim Foster or Rick Alexander to see about getting a copy. 

On Sun, Feb 16, 2020 at 6:03 AM Spock Arnold via Groups.Io <tmkldwwj=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Bruce;
     I don't know where you live in Florida, however, this Saturday the 22nd, the Florida Region is having a meet in Sarasota.  If you go on the Clubs Facebook page (Crosley Automobiles Fun Little Cars) and make a request, I am sure someone will have a tin block they can bring along. Also if you look at the club web page under Crosley Engine family Tree, you may find much of the information you are looking for.
                    Dave Anspach 

On Sunday, February 16, 2020, 08:44:30 AM EST, bruce.derenski via Groups.Io <bruce.derenski=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:


Crosley Fans,

I work for a contractor that is interested in innovative ways of making an engine block, specifically methods that don't require casting. I immediately thought of the COBRA. Are there any specific members on here who are knowledgeable about exactly HOW Crosley manufactured that engine? Any books, articles or publications would be helpful, too. So would seeing one of these engines close-up. I live in Florida, so a local source is best, but I can travel. Also, some questions for anyone who has disassembled a COBRA: Does the COBRA block look any different than a CIBA? In other words, can you look at a COBRA block and see how it was made? I'm trying to figure out if it's worthwhile to get my hands on an old COBRA block for the purpose of examining it, and perhaps even breaking it down into its original stamped components.

Thanks in advance. You folks are great.


Re: COBRA Block

Spock Arnold
 

Bruce;
     I don't know where you live in Florida, however, this Saturday the 22nd, the Florida Region is having a meet in Sarasota.  If you go on the Clubs Facebook page (Crosley Automobiles Fun Little Cars) and make a request, I am sure someone will have a tin block they can bring along. Also if you look at the club web page under Crosley Engine family Tree, you may find much of the information you are looking for.
                    Dave Anspach 

On Sunday, February 16, 2020, 08:44:30 AM EST, bruce.derenski via Groups.Io <bruce.derenski@...> wrote:


Crosley Fans,

I work for a contractor that is interested in innovative ways of making an engine block, specifically methods that don't require casting. I immediately thought of the COBRA. Are there any specific members on here who are knowledgeable about exactly HOW Crosley manufactured that engine? Any books, articles or publications would be helpful, too. So would seeing one of these engines close-up. I live in Florida, so a local source is best, but I can travel. Also, some questions for anyone who has disassembled a COBRA: Does the COBRA block look any different than a CIBA? In other words, can you look at a COBRA block and see how it was made? I'm trying to figure out if it's worthwhile to get my hands on an old COBRA block for the purpose of examining it, and perhaps even breaking it down into its original stamped components.

Thanks in advance. You folks are great.


Re: COBRA Block

Jim Bollman
 

Our club website is a good place to start your research.

Lots of members of the Gang have experience with the CoBra, some even have running examples in cars. Bad blocks for disassembly should be fairly easy to get, Good blocks for making a running engines a bit harder. The inside of the engine is basically the same as the CIBA, so if you're interested in that, reprints of the service manual is available from our vendors. Once you actually see a CoBra they are easy to spot.

I'm sure others will jump in but feel free to ask more questions after you have read the link above.

Jim...

On Feb 16, 2020, at 8:44 AM, bruce.derenski via Groups.Io <bruce.derenski@...> wrote:

Crosley Fans,

I work for a contractor that is interested in innovative ways of making an engine block, specifically methods that don't require casting. I immediately thought of the COBRA. Are there any specific members on here who are knowledgeable about exactly HOW Crosley manufactured that engine? Any books, articles or publications would be helpful, too. So would seeing one of these engines close-up. I live in Florida, so a local source is best, but I can travel. Also, some questions for anyone who has disassembled a COBRA: Does the COBRA block look any different than a CIBA? In other words, can you look at a COBRA block and see how it was made? I'm trying to figure out if it's worthwhile to get my hands on an old COBRA block for the purpose of examining it, and perhaps even breaking it down into its original stamped components.

Thanks in advance. You folks are great.


COBRA Block

Bruce Derenski
 

Crosley Fans,

I work for a contractor that is interested in innovative ways of making an engine block, specifically methods that don't require casting. I immediately thought of the COBRA. Are there any specific members on here who are knowledgeable about exactly HOW Crosley manufactured that engine? Any books, articles or publications would be helpful, too. So would seeing one of these engines close-up. I live in Florida, so a local source is best, but I can travel. Also, some questions for anyone who has disassembled a COBRA: Does the COBRA block look any different than a CIBA? In other words, can you look at a COBRA block and see how it was made? I'm trying to figure out if it's worthwhile to get my hands on an old COBRA block for the purpose of examining it, and perhaps even breaking it down into its original stamped components.

Thanks in advance. You folks are great.


Re: Brake Spring mystery

Randy C
 

The genuine Crosley optional right side tail light had only a single filament bulb so no stop light in it. At least that is the way it was on the 1948 station wagon and 1947 sedan I owned back in the 1960's.

   Randy


Re: Brake Spring mystery

Paula W
 

In case it matters - this car has only the one tail light and in there is only one bulb.
I appreciate all the comments. I have to (learn to) check for grounds and also get under that part of the car myself to see how that bake light switch operates and where that spring should go.

I did find one old post which may not be relevant to my situation (no answer jumps out), but it suggests the switch itself may benefit from maintenance.
http://crosleyautoclub.com/CrosleyGarage/Chassis/brake_light_switch.htm