Date   

Re: CC model hood hinges

Sam Perley
 

Body color typically but the zinc plated might look pretty neat :) 

Sam 

On Fri, Aug 7, 2020, 15:49 Mike S <miso7@...> wrote:
Oh great knowledge collective of all things (Crosley), can you enlighten this unworthy soul with what color the hood hinges were from the factory on the CC models?  Black / body color / zinc plated / manganese phosphate???? 
Mit grossen respeckt
your humble servant
Mike S


How many cars can I fit in my garage for the least outlay of cash?

Jim Bollman
 

Daniel Strohl is at it again, good read that a lot of us can identify with.
https://www.hemmings.com/stories/2020/08/06/how-many-cars-can-i-fit-in-my-garage-for-the-least-outlay-of-cash

Jim...


CC model hood hinges

Mike S
 

Oh great knowledge collective of all things (Crosley), can you enlighten this unworthy soul with what color the hood hinges were from the factory on the CC models?  Black / body color / zinc plated / manganese phosphate???? 
Mit grossen respeckt
your humble servant
Mike S


Re: Restoration tips for beginners

wpaxt@...
 

Park,

What a great tip!  It never occurred to me that the parts manual would list nuts, bolts, washers, etc.  This is just what I am needing.  The 1947 Roundside I am working on literally had every nut and bolt half-assed and I have had no idea what sizes I will need when I finally start putting things back together.  You saved me, thanks a million.

Bill


Re: Restoration tips for beginners

parkhunter@...
 

Another tip I’ve learned: the Crosley parts manual is just as useful as the service manual. The parts manual includes exploded diagrams of most parts of the car, which help when you can’t quite figure out an assembly. 


But where it really saved my bacon was on the miscellaneous nuts and bolts. The old hardware that comes off the car isn’t always in good shape, or you lose a washer, or get some pieces scrambled up.

The parts manual is detailed right down to the screws and bolts for every assembly. It can help you find the right little bit on the bench. Or I sometimes just went down to the local Ace store and replaced bolts, nuts, screws, washers, and rubber grommets right out of the parts bins. It’s nice to have the right new hardware during assembly. 

- Park


Re: Restoration tips for beginners

parkhunter@...
 

My two bits on the paint thing... my car got held up for 2-3 years because I didn’t have the tools or skills or money to paint it with a gun. 

After helping my son paint his Rambler using the roll-on method and Rustoleum marine grade paint, I decided to do my Crosley with rattle cans. I grew up painting model rockets and knew how to get a decent finish. Work with what you know. 

For me, cans were simple and easy to control. I used Rustoleum in standard colors they will always make (Hunter Green in my case). I’ll always be able to touch up scratches and dings.  

Whether you are doing it professionally or with cans, much of the finish depends on the quality of the prep work and the finish work. Wet sand between coats, then wipe the car with clean water, then wipe it down with mineral spirits, then wipe it down with a tack cloth between every coat. 

Humidity and temperature play a big role and can subtly affect the color and finish. Buy a little thermometer/humidity meter and keep track. I ended up moving a dehumidifier into the garage as the summer got muggier. High humidity leads to orange peel finish. Aargh!

The nice thing about paint is that if you screw it up, you can just sand it down and do it over. 

My car looks fine for an amateur restoration. It won’t match up with pros at big shows, but it’s plenty fine for me. I even got 3rd in class at the ‘19 Nationals.

And, going with what I knew got the project back in track. That’s important!

- Park


Re: Master Cylinder PSI

Jim Bollman
 

Skip, just curious, did you solve your brake problem? If so what was the problem?

Jim...


Keystone Region Meet Canceled

Jim Bollman
 

The Keystone Region Crosley meet for this year, held during the third weekend in August, has been cancelled. Due to the Covid situation the venue where the meet is held decided to cancel all events for the remainder of the year.

Save the third weekend in August in 2021!!!


New Crosley of the Month

Jim Bollman
 

Here is August CotM. Enjoy
http://crosleyautoclub.com/

If you want your Crosley or someone elses to be considered for CotM send me at least two pictures showing different parts of your car.
CAC@...

Jim...


Re: Master Cylinder PSI

L.E. Hardee
 

I will just repeat to be sure I was clear, even if the line or hose is blocked all but a pin hole, you will get full pressure in a static state.  But it would take a long time of pressing the brake pedal for that pin hole opening to pass enough fluid to move the wheel cylinder enough to activate the brake shoes.  It would do it eventually but it could take minutes.  Check the volume of fluid passed.


On Tue, Jul 28, 2020 at 2:30 PM Dennis @ Recks & Relics <truck@...> wrote:
There is a hose at the rear also. The hoses get old and plug up the inside and restrict flow. A common problem on older cars.
 
From: Tilden Drinkard
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2020 11:45 AM
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Master Cylinder PSI
 
My calculations are nearly the same.
Many reference materials say that on drum brakes you need +500 PSI at the wheel cylinders. I'm not a good enough
mathematician to calculate the result of hydraulic fluid leaving the 1" master cylinder at +/- 125 PSI & passing thru a 3/16"
line. I guess I'll call me Princeton educated physics professor buddy & give him the problem.
Thanx for your help


Re: Master Cylinder PSI

Dennis @ Recks & Relics
 

There is a hose at the rear also. The hoses get old and plug up the inside and restrict flow. A common problem on older cars.
 

From: Tilden Drinkard
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2020 11:45 AM
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Master Cylinder PSI
 
My calculations are nearly the same.
Many reference materials say that on drum brakes you need +500 PSI at the wheel cylinders. I'm not a good enough
mathematician to calculate the result of hydraulic fluid leaving the 1" master cylinder at +/- 125 PSI & passing thru a 3/16"
line. I guess I'll call me Princeton educated physics professor buddy & give him the problem.
Thanx for your help


Re: Master Cylinder PSI

 

That's great hydraulic physics to know.
After I disconnect the brake line, I'm gonna' attach the pressure gauge to the end of the brake line & see if there is any decrease in the pressure at the wheel.
I'm a little skeptical that +/- 125 psi is enough pressure to effectively deploy the brake shoes, but this is my 1st Crosley rebuild, & I'll certainly accept 
your experience in this matter.
Just for grins, I'll report back to you the psi reading.
Thanx so much for your advice.
Skip D


Re: Master Cylinder PSI

L.E. Hardee
 

The beauty of hydraulics is that the pressure at the end of the line no matter its diameter is the same as at the entrance, if not blocked, in a static state, ie: no movement.  The volume of fluid delivered is subject to frictional losses  due to a lot of factors including line size, bends and tube wall roughness. 

What i would do is disconnect one of the lines at one of the wheel cylinders not working right.  Direct the open line into a glass jar and get an helper to stomp on the brake pedal with all their might.  You should nearly blow the bottom of the jar out with the fluid squirt.  If it just dribbles, go upstream and repeat the procedure until you get a good squirt.  Make sure to refill the reservoir.  When you get the full squirt, you need to check the line or hose downstream for a restriction or blockage. 


On Tue, Jul 28, 2020 at 11:45 AM Tilden Drinkard <TILDENLD@...> wrote:
My calculations are nearly the same.
Many reference materials say that on drum brakes you need +500 PSI at the wheel cylinders. I'm not a good enough
mathematician to calculate the result of hydraulic fluid leaving the 1" master cylinder at +/- 125 PSI & passing thru a 3/16"
line. I guess I'll call me Princeton educated physics professor buddy & give him the problem.
Thanx for your help


Re: Master Cylinder PSI

 

Thanx everybody. Your quick & informative responses were very helpful. It's very encouraging when you are stumped
to have Crosley buddies to turn to.
Many Thanx, Skip D


Re: Master Cylinder PSI

 

My calculations are nearly the same.
Many reference materials say that on drum brakes you need +500 PSI at the wheel cylinders. I'm not a good enough
mathematician to calculate the result of hydraulic fluid leaving the 1" master cylinder at +/- 125 PSI & passing thru a 3/16"
line. I guess I'll call me Princeton educated physics professor buddy & give him the problem.
Thanx for your help


Re: Master Cylinder PSI

 

I only have hoses on the fronts, & I haven't gotten to them yet. That's good to know. Probably should replace
all hoses to be sure.
Thanx


Re: Master Cylinder PSI

 

All new wheel cylinders & replaced in the proper order.
Thanx


Re: Master Cylinder PSI

 

Most lines replaced & the others blown out, recharged & bled.
Thanx


Re: Master Cylinder PSI

 

Yup.
Thanx


Re: Master Cylinder PSI

 

All wheels cylinders are new.
Thanx