Date   
Free: Two Crosley Wheels - Syracuse, NY Area

Jim Bollman
 

I have 2 wheels and tires from a Crosley axle that my father gave me years ago. I would gladly give them away if someone wanted them. I hate to scrap them, but I have no use for them. I am located in Central New York near Syracuse.

Thank you, Steve.
snowsledder :AT" hotmail.com
Contact Steve directly if you what 2 free wheels, pickup only.
If no one wants them for themselves maybe someone can pick them up on the way to the Nationals and put them in the silent auction to help pay for the meet.

Re: Free 1950 CD Series Sedan

ldrmercuryman@...
 

Sam I  would be glad to pick up the 50 sedan if you still have it,  contact me off line at 765-546-3853 thank you


-----Original Message-----
From: Sam Nicolosi via Groups.Io <nicolosisa@...>
To: Crosley-Gang <Crosley-Gang@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Jun 27, 2018 3:13 pm
Subject: [Crosley-Gang] Free 1950 CD Series Sedan

The interior is filled with extra wheels & tires, and a hodge-podge of seat frames (2 front seat frames & one back bench frame) (no upholstery that's worth a darn). No engine or tranny. No Title.  Almost no body rust (S. Dakota car). 
Setting on all 4 wheels (2 are flat)  Won't roll.... I don't know why...  Located in Dayton, Ohio. Sold the property that it's located on. Must move it soon. Bring your own muscle.

Free 1950 CD Series Sedan

Sam Nicolosi
 

The interior is filled with extra wheels & tires, and a hodge-podge of seat frames (2 front seat frames & one back bench frame) (no upholstery that's worth a darn). No engine or tranny. No Title.  Almost no body rust (S. Dakota car). 
Setting on all 4 wheels (2 are flat)  Won't roll.... I don't know why...  Located in Dayton, Ohio. Sold the property that it's located on. Must move it soon. Bring your own muscle.

Re: For Sale: 52 Wagon, Dragster and more - LA Area of CA

James Dlapa
 

Did he have any other fageol stuff? Looking for a mirror block.

On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 1:39 PM Mike Mayberry <mikemayberry75@...> wrote:
 I purchased a stock crosley engine from him as well as a faegol 44 great guy!!!

Re: For Sale: 52 Wagon, Dragster and more - LA Area of CA

Mike Mayberry
 

 I purchased a stock crosley engine from him as well as a faegol 44 great guy!!!

Re: For Sale: 52 Wagon, Dragster and more - LA Area of CA

Jim Bollman
 

The dragster has sold but the 52 wagon, the Homelite 55, and other parts are still available.

Contact the owner directly

Jim...

Re: Tillotson carbs

Gabriel Haddad
 

Hello all, Jeff and I were discussing Tilly carb adjustments yesterday and trying to figure out how to preset the throttle adjustment screw. Is there a recommended amount turns in or out that screw should be for base tuning setup? The service manual only describes fine tune adjustment.
Thanks, Gabe.

On Thu, May 31, 2018, 12:43 PM crosleyshortsport <crosleyshortsport@...> wrote:
Anyone with a tillotson carb may want these instructions.

Attachments:

Re: Mary Ethel Miller's Passing

crosleyshortsport
 

Well said Dave,  I will also remember Mary Ethel for the joy she spread !
        Jeffrey

On Sun, Jun 24, 2018, 7:52 PM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
Dave Anspach President of CAC sent me this tribute to post.

Mary Ethel Miller
It is with extreme sadness I report to you the passing of Mary Ethel Miller of Pennsylvania.  Mary Ethel was the wife of our Director of Regions C. Joe Miller.  She was an active supporter of the hobby and the Crosley Club on a National level as well as the Pa Region.   For those of you who attend Wauseon, you will remember her in 2 areas.  First and foremost (to me) she was the lady with the cheery smile and ready laugh that seemed to be manning the Pa. Region tent almost constantly.  Secondly she was the person who was there when the Keystone Road rally kicked off…helping to organize things, passing out water, and keeping Joe calm.  
Personally, my earliest memory of Mary Ethel dates back over 20 years when I attended my first Crosley event in Pennsylvania.  I went to the event to learn more about the cars.  I walked in the door at the Brodbecks event and was immediately welcomed by her.  In short order, I had joined the Pennsylvania Region, got door prize tickets, and bought tickets for 2 different raffles.  In a whirlwind day, I met dozens of people, saw some fantastic cars, and had a fantastic time.  All because of her welcome!!  As I said I came to learn about cars… but I left understanding that the Club was the people…That was Mary Ethel….The people.  
We all mourn with the Miller family on the loss of this great lady.  Please remember her and her family in your prayers. 

Dave

Mary Ethel Miller's Passing

Jim Bollman
 
Edited

Dave Anspach President of CAC sent me this tribute to post.

Mary Ethel Miller
It is with extreme sadness I report to you the passing of Mary Ethel Miller of Pennsylvania.  Mary Ethel was the wife of our Director of Regions C. Joe Miller.  She was an active supporter of the hobby and the Crosley Club on a National level as well as the Pa Region.   For those of you who attend Wauseon, you will remember her in 2 areas.  First and foremost (to me) she was the lady with the cheery smile and ready laugh that seemed to be manning the Pa. Region tent almost constantly.  Secondly she was the person who was there when the Keystone Road rally kicked off…helping to organize things, passing out water, and keeping Joe calm. 

Personally, my earliest memory of Mary Ethel dates back over 20 years when I attended my first Crosley event in Pennsylvania.  I went to the event to learn more about the cars.  I walked in the door at the Brodbecks event and was immediately welcomed by her.  In short order, I had joined the Pennsylvania Region, got door prize tickets, and bought tickets for 2 different raffles.  In a whirlwind day, I met dozens of people, saw some fantastic cars, and had a fantastic time.  All because of her welcome!!  As I said I came to learn about cars… but I left understanding that the Club was the people…That was Mary Ethel….The people. 

We all mourn with the Miller family on the loss of this great lady.  Please remember her and her family in your prayers. 

Dave

Re: For Sale: PreWar Parts Car - North CA - $1100 or Best Offer

Jim Bollman
 

Price reduced to $900.

Contact Owner.

Jim...

Re: Pickup Needed On Way To Nationals - St Louis MO

Jim Bollman
 

Sorry I intend to post a status update. The parts have been picked up and are in Ohio waiting for the Nationals.

Thanks for the offer.

See you in a couple of weeks.

Jim...

On Jun 21, 2018, at 2:16 PM, Gary Cochrane via Groups.Io <g2cochrane@...> wrote:

Hi Jim,
If you do not have a volunteer for this yet, I am driving through St Louis on the way to convention and could pick it up
Gary Cochrane

On Tuesday, May 29, 2018, 4:47:23 PM PDT, Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:


The club has been given a car radio and a heater for the silent auction at the Nationals. Is there anyone passing close to St. Louis MO that would be willing to pick them up and deliver to the Nationals in July?

If you can, contact me, and I will get you together with the member making the donation.

Jim "AT" Bollman.com

Jim...

Re: Pickup Needed On Way To Nationals - St Louis MO

Gary Cochrane
 

Hi Jim,
If you do not have a volunteer for this yet, I am driving through St Louis on the way to convention and could pick it up
Gary Cochrane

On Tuesday, May 29, 2018, 4:47:23 PM PDT, Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:


The club has been given a car radio and a heater for the silent auction at the Nationals. Is there anyone passing close to St. Louis MO that would be willing to pick them up and deliver to the Nationals in July?

If you can, contact me, and I will get you together with the member making the donation.

Jim "AT" Bollman.com

Jim...

Re: Crofton Bug

Tom Sodaro
 

Steve, I am going to take pics and measurements and then set a tone to come up. 


On Jun 20, 2018, at 5:47 PM, Steve <brawnybug@...> wrote:

Tom,

Steve Miller here.  Come see me, I live 2 hours from DeKalb.  3 minutes west of Great America.  My Brawny Bug awaits you.

 

-Steve M.

 

From: Crosley-Gang@groups.io [mailto:Crosley-Gang@groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom Sodaro
Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 11:52 AM
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: [Crosley-Gang] Crofton Bug

 

Hello all,  live outside of Chicago. I am trying to find someone with a Crofton Bug within a couple of hours. I would like to see your Crofton and take some measurements. Still having problems with the clutch linkage. Thanks Tom Sodaro

General information (wiring to start an engine)

John Van Sickle
 

Interstate Batteries makes a quality 6 Volt - I have experienced  several   years of service for their batteries.

Re: General information (wiring to start an engine)

L.E. Hardee
 

6p volt group one battery is what fits the Crosley battery box.  If you can't readily find them at your auto parts store, try a tractor supply store.  It doesn't take a lot of amps to turn the Crosley engine so any amp rating should be fine.  Just don't expect a 6v battery to last more than a couple of years.  Not sure why, Just my experience.

On Wed, Jun 20, 2018 at 7:57 PM, Joe Brownsberger <jbraunsberg@...> wrote:
Thank you, this helps out a lot. I have since ordered a service book from service motors. What type of battery do you use? What cold crank amps do I need to look for?

On Wed, Jun 20, 2018, 7:17 PM <parkhunter@...> wrote:
Here's a crude diagram of what's necessary to wire a Crosley engine to start, whether in the car or on a test stand. This is for the original 6-volt POSITIVE GROUND system! This is the bare minimum to start and run the engine; it will not charge the battery or power lights or anything else.

For the ground and power straps (1 & 2 below) you need extremely heavy cables. The originals are about the thickness of a thumb! These are illustrated in black and red pen on the drawing.

For all other wiring, you can use small, light electrical wire. Bell wire works, or 14 or 16-guage automotive wire. In a pinch you can even use lamp cord.  :^)  These are illustrated with blue pen on the drawing.

Some notes:

1) The ground straps are the heavy, woven bare metal cables. The longer one goes from the positive (+) terminal on the battery to one of the bolts holding the starter motor to the bell housing.
... 1a) When the engine is in the car, the shorter one goes from a bell housing bolt to a bolt on the firewall to ground the metal body of the car and anything attached to it.
... 1b) When grounding anything on the car body, you need to scrape away a bit of the paint under the bolt to make metal-to-metal contact. 
... 1c) If the engine isn't in the car, you don't need the short cable BUT you will need to ground the solenoid (see 3b below). 

2) The power to actually crank the starter comes from the negative (-) terminal of the battery via a heavy, insulated cable to a bolt on one side of the solenoid, and then a second heavy cable from a bolt on the other side of the solenoid to the bolt on the side of the starter motor. The solenoid is a heavy-duty electrical switch that connects the power from the battery to the starter when you press the starter button on the dash.

3) The starter button connects to the negative (-) terminal of the battery via a small wire, and to the bolt on the front of the solenoid via another small wire. To complete the circuit, the solenoid must be grounded to the positive (+) terminal of the battery, which can happen two ways:
...3a) When the engine is in the car, through the solenoid's mount to the firewall (see 1a,b above)
...3b) When the engine is on a test stand, run a small wire from one of the solenoid's mounting points to the positive (+) side of the battery.
...3c) If you don't have the original starter button, a "normally open" (N.O.) push button, such as a door-bell button, will work.

4) The ignition switch (key) connects to the negative (-) terminal of the battery via a small wire, and to one of the side terminals on the coil, possibly marked (-). If you don't have the original ignition switch, an on/off toggle switch, such as a household light switch, will work.

5) The other side terminal on the coil, possibly marked (+), connects via a small wire to the terminal nut on the side of the distributor, which is also where the wire from the condenser connects. If you have purchased a new condenser, be careful that the screw you use to attach it to the side of the distributor does not go in too far and contact the mechanism inside the distributor - if this is the case, use a washer as a shim.

6) You need to use the proper style wire to connect the center terminal on the coil to the center terminal on the top of the distributor. And of course, wires from the distributor to the four spark plugs.

--
In operation, you turn on the ignition switch to power the coil and distributor, providing spark to the spark plugs.

When you press the starter button, it temporarily activates the solenoid switch (you should hear it click), which then connects the heavy-duty juice from the battery to the starter and cranks the engine.

When you're done running the engine, be sure to turn off the ignition switch. Otherwise, the battery will run down. To prevent this, on a test stand, I also connected one of the running lights to the same terminal on the ignition switch as the coil. The light must also be grounded to the positive (+) terminal on the battery). The light comes on when the ignition switch is on, reminding you to shut it off when you're done playing. 

Hope this helps!

Park Hunter

Attachments:


Re: General information (wiring to start an engine)

Joe Brownsberger
 

Thank you, this helps out a lot. I have since ordered a service book from service motors. What type of battery do you use? What cold crank amps do I need to look for?


On Wed, Jun 20, 2018, 7:17 PM <parkhunter@...> wrote:
Here's a crude diagram of what's necessary to wire a Crosley engine to start, whether in the car or on a test stand. This is for the original 6-volt POSITIVE GROUND system! This is the bare minimum to start and run the engine; it will not charge the battery or power lights or anything else.

For the ground and power straps (1 & 2 below) you need extremely heavy cables. The originals are about the thickness of a thumb! These are illustrated in black and red pen on the drawing.

For all other wiring, you can use small, light electrical wire. Bell wire works, or 14 or 16-guage automotive wire. In a pinch you can even use lamp cord.  :^)  These are illustrated with blue pen on the drawing.

Some notes:

1) The ground straps are the heavy, woven bare metal cables. The longer one goes from the positive (+) terminal on the battery to one of the bolts holding the starter motor to the bell housing.
... 1a) When the engine is in the car, the shorter one goes from a bell housing bolt to a bolt on the firewall to ground the metal body of the car and anything attached to it.
... 1b) When grounding anything on the car body, you need to scrape away a bit of the paint under the bolt to make metal-to-metal contact. 
... 1c) If the engine isn't in the car, you don't need the short cable BUT you will need to ground the solenoid (see 3b below). 

2) The power to actually crank the starter comes from the negative (-) terminal of the battery via a heavy, insulated cable to a bolt on one side of the solenoid, and then a second heavy cable from a bolt on the other side of the solenoid to the bolt on the side of the starter motor. The solenoid is a heavy-duty electrical switch that connects the power from the battery to the starter when you press the starter button on the dash.

3) The starter button connects to the negative (-) terminal of the battery via a small wire, and to the bolt on the front of the solenoid via another small wire. To complete the circuit, the solenoid must be grounded to the positive (+) terminal of the battery, which can happen two ways:
...3a) When the engine is in the car, through the solenoid's mount to the firewall (see 1a,b above)
...3b) When the engine is on a test stand, run a small wire from one of the solenoid's mounting points to the positive (+) side of the battery.
...3c) If you don't have the original starter button, a "normally open" (N.O.) push button, such as a door-bell button, will work.

4) The ignition switch (key) connects to the negative (-) terminal of the battery via a small wire, and to one of the side terminals on the coil, possibly marked (-). If you don't have the original ignition switch, an on/off toggle switch, such as a household light switch, will work.

5) The other side terminal on the coil, possibly marked (+), connects via a small wire to the terminal nut on the side of the distributor, which is also where the wire from the condenser connects. If you have purchased a new condenser, be careful that the screw you use to attach it to the side of the distributor does not go in too far and contact the mechanism inside the distributor - if this is the case, use a washer as a shim.

6) You need to use the proper style wire to connect the center terminal on the coil to the center terminal on the top of the distributor. And of course, wires from the distributor to the four spark plugs.

--
In operation, you turn on the ignition switch to power the coil and distributor, providing spark to the spark plugs.

When you press the starter button, it temporarily activates the solenoid switch (you should hear it click), which then connects the heavy-duty juice from the battery to the starter and cranks the engine.

When you're done running the engine, be sure to turn off the ignition switch. Otherwise, the battery will run down. To prevent this, on a test stand, I also connected one of the running lights to the same terminal on the ignition switch as the coil. The light must also be grounded to the positive (+) terminal on the battery). The light comes on when the ignition switch is on, reminding you to shut it off when you're done playing. 

Hope this helps!

Park Hunter

Attachments:

Re: General information (wiring to start an engine)

parkhunter@...
 

Here's a crude diagram of what's necessary to wire a Crosley engine to start, whether in the car or on a test stand. This is for the original 6-volt POSITIVE GROUND system! This is the bare minimum to start and run the engine; it will not charge the battery or power lights or anything else.

For the ground and power straps (1 & 2 below) you need extremely heavy cables. The originals are about the thickness of a thumb! These are illustrated in black and red pen on the drawing.

For all other wiring, you can use small, light electrical wire. Bell wire works, or 14 or 16-guage automotive wire. In a pinch you can even use lamp cord.  :^)  These are illustrated with blue pen on the drawing.

Some notes:

1) The ground straps are the heavy, woven bare metal cables. The longer one goes from the positive (+) terminal on the battery to one of the bolts holding the starter motor to the bell housing.
... 1a) When the engine is in the car, the shorter one goes from a bell housing bolt to a bolt on the firewall to ground the metal body of the car and anything attached to it.
... 1b) When grounding anything on the car body, you need to scrape away a bit of the paint under the bolt to make metal-to-metal contact. 
... 1c) If the engine isn't in the car, you don't need the short cable BUT you will need to ground the solenoid (see 3b below). 

2) The power to actually crank the starter comes from the negative (-) terminal of the battery via a heavy, insulated cable to a bolt on one side of the solenoid, and then a second heavy cable from a bolt on the other side of the solenoid to the bolt on the side of the starter motor. The solenoid is a heavy-duty electrical switch that connects the power from the battery to the starter when you press the starter button on the dash.

3) The starter button connects to the negative (-) terminal of the battery via a small wire, and to the bolt on the front of the solenoid via another small wire. To complete the circuit, the solenoid must be grounded to the positive (+) terminal of the battery, which can happen two ways:
...3a) When the engine is in the car, through the solenoid's mount to the firewall (see 1a,b above)
...3b) When the engine is on a test stand, run a small wire from one of the solenoid's mounting points to the positive (+) side of the battery.
...3c) If you don't have the original starter button, a "normally open" (N.O.) push button, such as a door-bell button, will work.

4) The ignition switch (key) connects to the negative (-) terminal of the battery via a small wire, and to one of the side terminals on the coil, possibly marked (-). If you don't have the original ignition switch, an on/off toggle switch, such as a household light switch, will work.

5) The other side terminal on the coil, possibly marked (+), connects via a small wire to the terminal nut on the side of the distributor, which is also where the wire from the condenser connects. If you have purchased a new condenser, be careful that the screw you use to attach it to the side of the distributor does not go in too far and contact the mechanism inside the distributor - if this is the case, use a washer as a shim.

6) You need to use the proper style wire to connect the center terminal on the coil to the center terminal on the top of the distributor. And of course, wires from the distributor to the four spark plugs.

--
In operation, you turn on the ignition switch to power the coil and distributor, providing spark to the spark plugs.

When you press the starter button, it temporarily activates the solenoid switch (you should hear it click), which then connects the heavy-duty juice from the battery to the starter and cranks the engine.

When you're done running the engine, be sure to turn off the ignition switch. Otherwise, the battery will run down. To prevent this, on a test stand, I also connected one of the running lights to the same terminal on the ignition switch as the coil. The light must also be grounded to the positive (+) terminal on the battery). The light comes on when the ignition switch is on, reminding you to shut it off when you're done playing. 

Hope this helps!

Park Hunter

Re: Crofton Bug

Steve
 

Tom,

Steve Miller here.  Come see me, I live 2 hours from DeKalb.  3 minutes west of Great America.  My Brawny Bug awaits you.

 

-Steve M.

 

From: Crosley-Gang@groups.io [mailto:Crosley-Gang@groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom Sodaro
Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 11:52 AM
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: [Crosley-Gang] Crofton Bug

 

Hello all,  live outside of Chicago. I am trying to find someone with a Crofton Bug within a couple of hours. I would like to see your Crofton and take some measurements. Still having problems with the clutch linkage. Thanks Tom Sodaro

Crofton Bug

Tom Sodaro
 

Hello all,  live outside of Chicago. I am trying to find someone with a Crofton Bug within a couple of hours. I would like to see your Crofton and take some measurements. Still having problems with the clutch linkage. Thanks Tom Sodaro

Re: car won't run over 35 mph

Terrance Robinson
 

appreciate all your pointers to us "in trouble"--Terry

On Tue, Jun 12, 2018 at 5:17 PM, Butch via Groups.Io <butch46988@...> wrote:
Paul,

Not to shoot you down, but Crosley valves are supposed to be adjusted COLD.

The first thing to check, is the ignition timing, while you're doing that, also check the distributor advance mechanism. Not super rare to find them stuck.

Butch

Butch

On 6/12/2018 4:41 PM, paul wrote:

Folks,

been out in the garage piddling, thinking.  early in the thread someone mentioned good tune up.  please shoot me down as overthinking but,  is there a chance the valves have been adjusted cold?  would that create enough expansion of the shim pack etc when hot to hold the valves open just a bit?  tight enough to bleed off a bit of compression before the plug fires?  grasping at straws trying to help,  Paul Rinehart













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