Date   

Re: Main bearing clearances

David
 

I race a Crosley powered H mod and I change bearings once a year.  With a new set of main bearings, the crank will be very hard to turn.  I sand the thrust flange on the rear main until I get .004” clearance (not sure if this is the ideal clearance).

 

David

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Steve Olinger
Sent: Sunday, September 20, 2020 10:27 AM
To: crosley-gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Main bearing clearances

 

 I ran into the same problem if you are speaking of the thrust main bearing (the one with the flanges). Spoke to Butch when he ran Service Motors and he had never had or heard any customers have this problem with the new bearings. Everything plastigauged fine as far as the clearances but the thrust bearing was too thick on the flanges. I carefully sanded the flanges on flat glass and miked till I got the correct clearance. and even flange thickness.
Steve

September 20 2020 12:35 PM, "Jerry Summey via groups.io" <gaelecsol@...> wrote:

What, if any, should the clearance be from the outer face of the rear main bearing to the crankshaft counter weight. I have a new set of bearings and when you lay the crankshaft in the crankcase and try to turn it, the bearing turns as well. There is no clearance at all. This is being done with the bearings in the crankcase only, none of the bearing caps have been installed. I have built several Crosley engines and this is a first for me.

 


Re: Main bearing clearances

Steve Olinger
 

 I ran into the same problem if you are speaking of the thrust main bearing (the one with the flanges). Spoke to Butch when he ran Service Motors and he had never had or heard any customers have this problem with the new bearings. Everything plastigauged fine as far as the clearances but the thrust bearing was too thick on the flanges. I carefully sanded the flanges on flat glass and miked till I got the correct clearance. and even flange thickness.
Steve

September 20 2020 12:35 PM, "Jerry Summey via groups.io" <gaelecsol@...> wrote:

What, if any, should the clearance be from the outer face of the rear main bearing to the crankshaft counter weight. I have a new set of bearings and when you lay the crankshaft in the crankcase and try to turn it, the bearing turns as well. There is no clearance at all. This is being done with the bearings in the crankcase only, none of the bearing caps have been installed. I have built several Crosley engines and this is a first for me.


Main bearing clearances

Jerry Summey
 

What, if any, should the clearance be from the outer face of the rear main bearing to the crankshaft counter weight. I have a new set of bearings and when you lay the crankshaft in the crankcase and try to turn it, the bearing turns as well. There is no clearance at all. This is being done with the bearings in the crankcase only, none of the bearing caps have been installed. I have built several Crosley engines and this is a first for me.


Re: 6-Bolt water pump rebuild

James Hudson
 

Thank you for posting this Butch, I have two that I want to rebuild and this will help a lot. As regards a pitted bore, I read somewhere-I think on this forum but I can't find it-that you could use JB-weld to fill up the pitted portions of the bore and smooth it out. Would you recommend that?-Jim


Re: Hung brake? Sticking brake?

David Reina
 

Hi Steve,

I read Butch’s reply and it may be that. Here is another possibility that has gotten me. Sometimes a brake line will go bad and swell up internally. When this happens your foot can generate enough pressure to force fluid past the bad area but the brake springs don’t have enough power to push the fluid back to the master cylinder. If it happens up front you would only have one wheel locking but if the back line goes bad both wheels could lock up.

All this is reminding me that I have a front wheel cylinder on my Super Sport that grabs and needs to be changed. I think in my case its the wheel cylinder?

Good luck!

David Reina
Brooklyn, NY


Re: Hung brake? Sticking brake?

Steve
 

Thanks everyone for all the ideas.  To answer a few of the questions, it’s a 1950 with 9” Bendix hydraulics.  I don’t know if it was just one brake sticking or all.  I once had an entire brake lining come off a shoe and wedge itself between the other shoe and the drum.  Been there, fixed that on my Crofton Bug.  So thanks, everyone.  I have many starting points and some I would not have thought of. 

 

-Steve M.

 

From: Crosley-Gang@groups.io [mailto:Crosley-Gang@groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Cameron via groups.io
Sent: Friday, September 18, 2020 9:18 PM
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Hung brake? Sticking brake?

 

Steve

I don't see what model Crosley you have but I had that problem with my 1949 Crosley Hotshot with 4 wheel disc (spot) brakes. The problem turned out to be the right emergency brake linkage. It was not releasing until I gently moved the lever at the rear backing plate. That released the brake lock up. Still haven't found a real fix but I just don't use the ebrake anymore.

-Steve Cameron

-----Original Message-----
From: Plandersen <pkandersen@...>
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Sent: Fri, Sep 18, 2020 6:39 pm
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Hung brake? Sticking brake?

Steve, my experience with something like that was not with a Crosley so I do not know if it equates but is worth looking at.  On mine the brake pedal was not coming fully up and so the master cylinder was not releasing the pressure.  It would build and build until it locked the brakes.  After it sat for awhile it would release on its own.  Lubed the brake pedal and made sure it was fully retuning after it was pressed.  It then didn’t give me anymore trouble.  Kent



On Sep 18, 2020, at 4:19 PM, Steve <brawnybug@...> wrote:

 

I have some ideas on this problem but want to seek the advice of the Crosley collective.

 

Last weekend at the Illinois Meet we did our small cruise.  Nice and slow, a little stop and go.  When we returned to the park, I proceeded to load my Crosley on its trailer.  I hooked up my winch and the car did not want to move.  Checked the shifter, it wasn’t in gear.  Checked the e-brake, it wasn’t set.  I really had to work the winch hard to get it loaded.

 

2 hours later when I’m home, it rolls off the trailer easy as can be.  I suspect I have a brake hanging up, but I suspect the hydraulic components more than the springs.  I’m thinking:

1.      Bleed the brakes

2.      Check wheel cylinders

3.      Check brake lines for collapse.

 

Something was stuck, but released over time.  Here’s your chance, please share your experience.

 

-Steve M.

 

 


Re: Hemmings Has Included Crosley In Another Story

David Stubenvoll
 

At present I own a ‘49 Crosley wagon, a ‘46 King Midget model 1, and a ‘58 King Midget model 3. I have owned 3 Metropolitans over the years. Each car has their highs and lows. 

While marketed in the US, metros were built in England so they can’t really be considered a domestic car. They are however the most roadable/drivable of the lot. The big downside is the Uni-body construction. They are very very difficult to restore if there is any significant rust. 

My number two would be Crosleys. Plentiful and simple cars with enough parts availability to allow any decent home shop to restore and enjoy one. Can be driven almost anywhere. 

King Midgets are a cross between a lawn mower and a golf cart. A shoestring operation from the start, they managed to keep production rolling from 1946 into the late 1960s. They are fun but certainly not a touring type vehicle. I’ve heard it said that any mechanic with a couple sheets of roofing tin, a stack of steel tubing and an old Briggs and Stratton could build one - not far from the truth. Unconventional but simple to work on. Also the most affordable of the group. 

The Bantams, especially the roadsters, claim the prize for defining the term “cute”. Donald Duck drove one in his cartoons. I’ve never owned one but would if the chance presented itself. Fairly rare, arguably exotic, but certainly not inexpensive. 


On Sep 19, 2020, at 7:15 AM, Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:

Which one of these four early compact cars would you choose for your Dream Garage?Asking the question would you rather have a Batam, Crosley, Metropolitan or King Midget
https://www.hemmings.com/stories/2020/09/18/which-one-of-these-four-early-compact-cars-would-you-choose-for-your-dream-garage

Crosley is trailing in 3rd or 4th place in the comment section. Metropolitan is the leader. But it is nice to just be nominated :-)


Hemmings Has Included Crosley In Another Story

Jim Bollman
 

Which one of these four early compact cars would you choose for your Dream Garage?Asking the question would you rather have a Batam, Crosley, Metropolitan or King Midget
https://www.hemmings.com/stories/2020/09/18/which-one-of-these-four-early-compact-cars-would-you-choose-for-your-dream-garage

Crosley is trailing in 3rd or 4th place in the comment section. Metropolitan is the leader. But it is nice to just be nominated :-)


Re: Hung brake? Sticking brake?

 

Steve
I don't see what model Crosley you have but I had that problem with my 1949 Crosley Hotshot with 4 wheel disc (spot) brakes. The problem turned out to be the right emergency brake linkage. It was not releasing until I gently moved the lever at the rear backing plate. That released the brake lock up. Still haven't found a real fix but I just don't use the ebrake anymore.
-Steve Cameron


-----Original Message-----
From: Plandersen <pkandersen@...>
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Sent: Fri, Sep 18, 2020 6:39 pm
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Hung brake? Sticking brake?

Steve, my experience with something like that was not with a Crosley so I do not know if it equates but is worth looking at.  On mine the brake pedal was not coming fully up and so the master cylinder was not releasing the pressure.  It would build and build until it locked the brakes.  After it sat for awhile it would release on its own.  Lubed the brake pedal and made sure it was fully retuning after it was pressed.  It then didn’t give me anymore trouble.  Kent

On Sep 18, 2020, at 4:19 PM, Steve <brawnybug@...> wrote:

I have some ideas on this problem but want to seek the advice of the Crosley collective.
 
Last weekend at the Illinois Meet we did our small cruise.  Nice and slow, a little stop and go.  When we returned to the park, I proceeded to load my Crosley on its trailer.  I hooked up my winch and the car did not want to move.  Checked the shifter, it wasn’t in gear.  Checked the e-brake, it wasn’t set.  I really had to work the winch hard to get it loaded.
 
2 hours later when I’m home, it rolls off the trailer easy as can be.  I suspect I have a brake hanging up, but I suspect the hydraulic components more than the springs.  I’m thinking:
1.      Bleed the brakes
2.      Check wheel cylinders
3.      Check brake lines for collapse.
 
Something was stuck, but released over time.  Here’s your chance, please share your experience.
 
-Steve M.
 


Re: Hung brake? Sticking brake?

Plandersen
 

Steve, my experience with something like that was not with a Crosley so I do not know if it equates but is worth looking at.  On mine the brake pedal was not coming fully up and so the master cylinder was not releasing the pressure.  It would build and build until it locked the brakes.  After it sat for awhile it would release on its own.  Lubed the brake pedal and made sure it was fully retuning after it was pressed.  It then didn’t give me anymore trouble.  Kent

On Sep 18, 2020, at 4:19 PM, Steve <brawnybug@...> wrote:

I have some ideas on this problem but want to seek the advice of the Crosley collective.
 
Last weekend at the Illinois Meet we did our small cruise.  Nice and slow, a little stop and go.  When we returned to the park, I proceeded to load my Crosley on its trailer.  I hooked up my winch and the car did not want to move.  Checked the shifter, it wasn’t in gear.  Checked the e-brake, it wasn’t set.  I really had to work the winch hard to get it loaded.
 
2 hours later when I’m home, it rolls off the trailer easy as can be.  I suspect I have a brake hanging up, but I suspect the hydraulic components more than the springs.  I’m thinking:
1.      Bleed the brakes
2.      Check wheel cylinders
3.      Check brake lines for collapse.
 
Something was stuck, but released over time.  Here’s your chance, please share your experience.
 
-Steve M.
 


Re: Hung brake? Sticking brake?

L.E. Hardee
 

A question:  When loading the Crosley, were all wheels dragging or just one?  I have had a sticking wheel cylinder that would lockup when the brakes were applied hard but release over time if left alone.  I have also had a brake lining that had a piece break off and jam between brake shoe and drum.  Rolling the car backwards spit out the piece and it fell harmlessly into the drum. 


On Fri, Sep 18, 2020 at 7:37 PM Steve Olinger <olinger@...> wrote:
Oops hit the send button and sent a blank message the first time! I second what Butch said. Its probably the little return hole in the master cylinder stopped up or not any free travel in the pedal.
Steve

September 18 2020 7:33 PM, "Steve Olinger" <olinger@...> wrote:


September 18 2020 7:19 PM, "Steve" <brawnybug@...> wrote:
 

I have some ideas on this problem but want to seek the advice of the Crosley collective.

 

Last weekend at the Illinois Meet we did our small cruise.  Nice and slow, a little stop and go.  When we returned to the park, I proceeded to load my Crosley on its trailer.  I hooked up my winch and the car did not want to move.  Checked the shifter, it wasn’t in gear.  Checked the e-brake, it wasn’t set.  I really had to work the winch hard to get it loaded.

 

2 hours later when I’m home, it rolls off the trailer easy as can be.  I suspect I have a brake hanging up, but I suspect the hydraulic components more than the springs.  I’m thinking:

1.      Bleed the brakes

2.      Check wheel cylinders

3.      Check brake lines for collapse.

 

Something was stuck, but released over time.  Here’s your chance, please share your experience.

 

-Steve M.


Re: Hung brake? Sticking brake?

Steve Olinger
 

Oops hit the send button and sent a blank message the first time! I second what Butch said. Its probably the little return hole in the master cylinder stopped up or not any free travel in the pedal.
Steve

September 18 2020 7:33 PM, "Steve Olinger" <olinger@...> wrote:



September 18 2020 7:19 PM, "Steve" <brawnybug@...> wrote:
 

I have some ideas on this problem but want to seek the advice of the Crosley collective.

 

Last weekend at the Illinois Meet we did our small cruise.  Nice and slow, a little stop and go.  When we returned to the park, I proceeded to load my Crosley on its trailer.  I hooked up my winch and the car did not want to move.  Checked the shifter, it wasn’t in gear.  Checked the e-brake, it wasn’t set.  I really had to work the winch hard to get it loaded.

 

2 hours later when I’m home, it rolls off the trailer easy as can be.  I suspect I have a brake hanging up, but I suspect the hydraulic components more than the springs.  I’m thinking:

1.      Bleed the brakes

2.      Check wheel cylinders

3.      Check brake lines for collapse.

 

Something was stuck, but released over time.  Here’s your chance, please share your experience.

 

-Steve M.


Re: Hung brake? Sticking brake?

Steve Olinger
 



September 18 2020 7:19 PM, "Steve" <brawnybug@...> wrote:

I have some ideas on this problem but want to seek the advice of the Crosley collective.

 

Last weekend at the Illinois Meet we did our small cruise.  Nice and slow, a little stop and go.  When we returned to the park, I proceeded to load my Crosley on its trailer.  I hooked up my winch and the car did not want to move.  Checked the shifter, it wasn’t in gear.  Checked the e-brake, it wasn’t set.  I really had to work the winch hard to get it loaded.

 

2 hours later when I’m home, it rolls off the trailer easy as can be.  I suspect I have a brake hanging up, but I suspect the hydraulic components more than the springs.  I’m thinking:

1.      Bleed the brakes

2.      Check wheel cylinders

3.      Check brake lines for collapse.

 

Something was stuck, but released over time.  Here’s your chance, please share your experience.

 

-Steve M.


Re: Hung brake? Sticking brake?

Butch
 

Steve,

Quite possibly the master cylinder. There are two ports in there, one lets the fluid return to the master cylinder, from the wheel cylinders, after a brake application is over.

Talk about exciting, I had that happen to me on the front wheel brake of a motorcycle. It would set the brake tight enough, to lock up the tire while slowing down. A quick opening on the bleeder, would produce a tiny spurt of fluid, enough to relieve the pressure in the caliper, and no more drag.

Cleaning the master cylinder ports out, fixed the problem.

Just a possible idea.

Butch

On 9/18/2020 7:19 PM, Steve wrote:

I have some ideas on this problem but want to seek the advice of the Crosley collective.

Last weekend at the Illinois Meet we did our small cruise.  Nice and slow, a little stop and go.  When we returned to the park, I proceeded to load my Crosley on its trailer.  I hooked up my winch and the car did not want to move.  Checked the shifter, it wasn’t in gear.  Checked the e-brake, it wasn’t set.  I really had to work the winch hard to get it loaded

 

2 hours later when I’m home, it rolls off the trailer easy as can be.  I suspect I have a brake hanging up, but I suspect the hydraulic components more than the springs.  I’m thinking:

1.      Bleed the brakes

2.      Check wheel cylinders

3.      Check brake lines for collapse.

 

Something was stuck, but released over time.  Here’s your chance, please share your experience.

 

-Steve M.


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Hung brake? Sticking brake?

Steve
 

I have some ideas on this problem but want to seek the advice of the Crosley collective.

 

Last weekend at the Illinois Meet we did our small cruise.  Nice and slow, a little stop and go.  When we returned to the park, I proceeded to load my Crosley on its trailer.  I hooked up my winch and the car did not want to move.  Checked the shifter, it wasn’t in gear.  Checked the e-brake, it wasn’t set.  I really had to work the winch hard to get it loaded.

 

2 hours later when I’m home, it rolls off the trailer easy as can be.  I suspect I have a brake hanging up, but I suspect the hydraulic components more than the springs.  I’m thinking:

1.      Bleed the brakes

2.      Check wheel cylinders

3.      Check brake lines for collapse.

 

Something was stuck, but released over time.  Here’s your chance, please share your experience.

 

-Steve M.

 


Re: 6-Bolt water pump rebuild

Butch
 

Andy,

Since we did a lot of them, I made some jigs and tools, to do the job easier and better. For just a couple, it's not worth the investment in time, to do so.

Make sure that the bores are clean and smooth, they will most likely be pitted, so use some fine sandpaper to smooth the edges, do NOT try to remove the pits.

Use plenty of grease, put the shaft up thru the newly installed bushing (which will most likely need reaming/honing, to allow the shaft to pass thru it), grease the shaft and seal thoroughly and carefully start the seal, using a small screwdriver over the end and passed the bolt hole.

Then, using the same small screwdriver, tuck the outside edges down into the liberally greased bore. Use a piece of tubing to bottom it out.

Do it again, on the next ring, then put the female VEE washer on, press it down, then the spring, then the male VEE washer, then the next seal (this one is the tough one!), then the last female VEE washer.

Now, while holding it all compressed, put the retaining cap on and crimp into the groove in the pump snout.

Simple, huh!

A little caveat, make sure that the grease/water weep hole, is clear, BEFORE you start. If it is plugged up, you can blow the cap off of the pump, while greasing it.

We always greased them, while spinning them on a drill press, to get everything seated and acquainted with each other.

Hope that this helps,

Butch

On 9/18/2020 9:25 AM, Andy Drake wrote:
I have a pile of water pump cores and am getting ready to rebuild a few. I've done a large number of three or four bolt water pumps in the past, but never a six bolt. Is there any special trick to them? The construction is quite a bit different than the earlier style with the packing. I don't want to damage the seals putting them in, so there must be a preferred way. Thanks!
--
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6-Bolt water pump rebuild

Andy Drake
 

I have a pile of water pump cores and am getting ready to rebuild a few. I've done a large number of three or four bolt water pumps in the past, but never a six bolt. Is there any special trick to them? The construction is quite a bit different than the earlier style with the packing. I don't want to damage the seals putting them in, so there must be a preferred way. Thanks!


Re: Hood support rod

Andy Farley
 

All very good and appreciated input. Thank You all. I'm sure I'll find one or a combination of your suggestions to be a perfect solution.


Re: Hood support rod

Mike S
 

I went & looked at our '48 and was surprised that it didn't take much of a "bump" for the rod to want to slide back & the hood come down.  Since I had the hood off recently, I noticed that I didn't have the two bolts & nuts very tight.  I snugged them up just a little & now the rod still slides well on the main rod, isn't as easy to accidentally move.  


Re: Hood support rod

Jerriffic
 

 I display my 48 CC at car shows with the hood up.  My biggest fear was the  hood slamming down on a spectator.  My solution is to loop a small chain around the radiator fill neck with a hook on the opposite end securing the vertical support rod.  I found a chain and hook from an old florescent shop light that works perfectly.
 
Jerry B