Date   

Re: Mechanical Brake Rebuild

David Reina
 

Hi Jim,

My experience may differ as you reused the old woven style shoes and I put in new linings.  I think my car stops well now but it was a long process to get them working.

Also your question gives me an opportunity to tell a story I've been meaning to post which may be a cautionary tale for others.

First I replaced the original cables with new ones from Yankee Crosley.  I installed shoes from Service Motors.  The new shoes had a woven metallic material epoxied to the cast iron shoe.  I was preparing to bring the car up from Brooklyn to the Microcar show in the Boston area.  A automotive minded neighbor came over to help with the cable and brake adjustment.  We worked on it for over a day but could not achieve a crisp stop.  I brought the car to Boston and learned that as part of the next days activities all the cars would be going on a 100 mile tour.   (50 miles out and 50 back).  I got underneath and tightened the adjustments.  The next day I was paired with a navigator and off we went.  That area of MA has some good hills with stop signs at the bottom.  Very scary- the brakes slowed us but it just would not stop sharply.  Every time the group stopped for a break I got under the car and tried tightening further.  It didn't improve.  The last leg of the tour was up a mountain.  My navigator and I stayed behind in a parking lot and I tightened once more.  The we met the group for the trip back and we were rolling at about 40mph for over 30 minutes.  All of a sudden I heard clunking noises and the car stopped.  I got the car off to a shoulder and could tell that the front wheel locked up.  I stayed there to await a flatbed while the rest of the group headed back for a waiting dinner.  I had an arrangement with my antique car insurance to provide roadside assistance when needed.  This didn't work out as the 800 number put me in touch with a dispatcher in CA who was having trouble lining up the right service in MA.
Several hours went by and it was getting dark.  And I was worried that I would run out of battery in my cell phone.  Finally I called the event organizer and asked for help.  The arrangement before we left for the tour was that any breakdowns would be rescued.  He came with a trailer and got me back and I ate my cold supper my navigator had saved for me.  While it was still up on the trailer I pulled the wheel and drum off the front and saw the damage.  The metallic brake lining had come off the shoe, jammed things up in the drum and broken the cast iron shoe.  I pulled all the broken pieces out and closed up the drum and wheel.  My theory is that having adjusted the brake to such a tight point, a lot of heat was generated which made the epoxy which held the lining to the shoe fail.  My gut feeling is that that woven metallic lining was never bed in and bite against the drum.  If anybody else has had a positive successful outcome using that style shoe please let me know.

An interesting aside is that even with all the brake guts removed from the right front , the cars other three brakes still felt about the same and slowed the car the same as the day before.

I was able to cautiously drive the car to my in-laws house in nearby Brookline, MA.  During visits over the next year I pulled all the brakes apart.  My mother in-law had a well equipped wood shop with a drill press and stationary belt sander.  Jaks Phillips. gave me a bunch of cast iron shoes which had the original riveted linings. I stripped them down the cast iron and using standard lining material I had bought years ago from Dave Edwards I cut, drilled and countersunk the lining material and using a J.C Whitney rivet setting tool I installed the new linings on the shoes.  That went well but I remembered that Dave had warned me the new lining was a little thicker than the original.  That turned out to be the case and I couldn't put on the drum.  Using the drum as a shape guide I sanded them thinner on the stationary belt sander with a fixed table.  That took an afternoon but I got them matched to the drum diameter and installed and now the car stops great.

So Jim, that my tale and yes I think the car can be made to stop OK.  Of course that also depends on how many 200+ lb. passengers are in it.

Regards,
Dave Reina
Brooklyn, NY


-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Liberty <jimliberty356@...>
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Nov 20, 2021 2:28 pm
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Mechanical Brake Rebuild

Gang, I did a complete re-do of my mechanical brakes on my '47 PU. I have not driven the car yet, but I'm most interested in the stopping ability. Comments anyone.    ......Jim.

On Sat, Nov 20, 2021 at 8:12 AM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
I’m doing my first mechanical brake rebuild in almost 60 years. First a hint that seems to work if your brake cables are not to rusty and messed up. I took my cables off and soaked them in Evapo-Rust (available lots of places, I bought mine at Harbor Freight). It is a non toxic process and only removes rust so you can not leave things in to long. I soaked them over night then wiped the visible parts of the cable off and  rinsed in water then put the backing plate end in a vise and pulled the sheath to the other end and put that end back in the Evap-Rust to soak a bit longer. Now I’m trying to decide if I should oil or grease the cables before reinstalling. I need to make or order some wedges for the cross bar to do the adjusting, The original lining is a woven style, probably asbestos. Decide to reuse it since it is in good condition for the milage the pickup will ever get. Any other tips for doing mechanical brakes anyone wants to share?





Re: Mechanical Brake Rebuild

Jim Liberty
 

Gang, I did a complete re-do of my mechanical brakes on my '47 PU. I have not driven the car yet, but I'm most interested in the stopping ability. Comments anyone.    ......Jim.

On Sat, Nov 20, 2021 at 8:12 AM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
I’m doing my first mechanical brake rebuild in almost 60 years. First a hint that seems to work if your brake cables are not to rusty and messed up. I took my cables off and soaked them in Evapo-Rust (available lots of places, I bought mine at Harbor Freight). It is a non toxic process and only removes rust so you can not leave things in to long. I soaked them over night then wiped the visible parts of the cable off and  rinsed in water then put the backing plate end in a vise and pulled the sheath to the other end and put that end back in the Evap-Rust to soak a bit longer. Now I’m trying to decide if I should oil or grease the cables before reinstalling. I need to make or order some wedges for the cross bar to do the adjusting, The original lining is a woven style, probably asbestos. Decide to reuse it since it is in good condition for the milage the pickup will ever get. Any other tips for doing mechanical brakes anyone wants to share?





Re: Mechanical Brake Rebuild

Jim Bollman
 

Good point about attracting dirt. Wonder if I can get enough silicon spray back in the sheath on the front cables. On the rear the sheath is short compared to the cable so you can pull the silicon back in but the front there isn’t that much exposed cable. I’ll give it a try. 

Anyone that wants to butt in to tell me how to or a better ways to do the brakes please do, like I said it has been along time. I switched my only mechanical brake car to hydraulics 50 years ago when I redid what I had done 70 years ago. I didn’t think I would own another with 6” brakes and figured I would convert it if I did but decided to this one with the original brakes and see if I can make them reasonably safe. My cars are all stored in a dry shop so once working right in theory they shouldn’t need much attention where hydraulics do go down hill with time even if stored properly. 

On Nov 20, 2021, at 11:24 AM, Charles Braughton via groups.io <clbraughton@...> wrote:

Use a dry silicon spray to lube your brake cables. Oil or grease collect dust and debris plus will freeze up in cold weather, don't mean to butt in, but safety first.


On Sat, Nov 20, 2021 at 10:12 AM, Jim Bollman
<Jim@...> wrote:
I’m doing my first mechanical brake rebuild in almost 60 years. First a hint that seems to work if your brake cables are not to rusty and messed up. I took my cables off and soaked them in Evapo-Rust (available lots of places, I bought mine at Harbor Freight). It is a non toxic process and only removes rust so you can not leave things in to long. I soaked them over night then wiped the visible parts of the cable off and  rinsed in water then put the backing plate end in a vise and pulled the sheath to the other end and put that end back in the Evap-Rust to soak a bit longer. Now I’m trying to decide if I should oil or grease the cables before reinstalling. I need to make or order some wedges for the cross bar to do the adjusting, The original lining is a woven style, probably asbestos. Decide to reuse it since it is in good condition for the milage the pickup will ever get. Any other tips for doing mechanical brakes anyone wants to share?






Re: Mechanical Brake Rebuild

Charles Braughton
 

Use a dry silicon spray to lube your brake cables. Oil or grease collect dust and debris plus will freeze up in cold weather, don't mean to butt in, but safety first.


On Sat, Nov 20, 2021 at 10:12 AM, Jim Bollman
<Jim@...> wrote:
I’m doing my first mechanical brake rebuild in almost 60 years. First a hint that seems to work if your brake cables are not to rusty and messed up. I took my cables off and soaked them in Evapo-Rust (available lots of places, I bought mine at Harbor Freight). It is a non toxic process and only removes rust so you can not leave things in to long. I soaked them over night then wiped the visible parts of the cable off and  rinsed in water then put the backing plate end in a vise and pulled the sheath to the other end and put that end back in the Evap-Rust to soak a bit longer. Now I’m trying to decide if I should oil or grease the cables before reinstalling. I need to make or order some wedges for the cross bar to do the adjusting, The original lining is a woven style, probably asbestos. Decide to reuse it since it is in good condition for the milage the pickup will ever get. Any other tips for doing mechanical brakes anyone wants to share?





Mechanical Brake Rebuild

Jim Bollman
 

I’m doing my first mechanical brake rebuild in almost 60 years. First a hint that seems to work if your brake cables are not to rusty and messed up. I took my cables off and soaked them in Evapo-Rust (available lots of places, I bought mine at Harbor Freight). It is a non toxic process and only removes rust so you can not leave things in to long. I soaked them over night then wiped the visible parts of the cable off and rinsed in water then put the backing plate end in a vise and pulled the sheath to the other end and put that end back in the Evap-Rust to soak a bit longer. Now I’m trying to decide if I should oil or grease the cables before reinstalling. I need to make or order some wedges for the cross bar to do the adjusting, The original lining is a woven style, probably asbestos. Decide to reuse it since it is in good condition for the milage the pickup will ever get. Any other tips for doing mechanical brakes anyone wants to share?


Re: For Sale: 1949 Sedan, Rough - NJ - $500 or Best Offer

Jim Liberty
 

It'l buff out.     ......Jim.

On Tue, Nov 16, 2021 at 6:49 PM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
1949 Crosley CD sedan $500 or Best Offer 
Body poor. Engine drive train intact. Good for parts 
Has title
Central Jersey (Near Rutgers campus New Brunswick) 

Hal <hizzo@...>

Attachments:


For Sale: 1949 Sedan, Rough - NJ - $500 or Best Offer

Jim Bollman
 

1949 Crosley CD sedan $500 or Best Offer 
Body poor. Engine drive train intact. Good for parts 
Has title
Central Jersey (Near Rutgers campus New Brunswick) 

Hal <hizzo@...>


BaT Auction: No Reserve: 1950 Crosley CD Four Convertible - WI

Jim Bollman
 

Very nice freshly restored 1950 Convertible just went up on the Bring a Trailer auction site. Will be interesting to see what it brings in a no reserve auction. Not a Super so it has sliding windows.

https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1950-crosley-roll-back-convertible/?utm_source=dm&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2021-11-16

Jim...


Re: Rear 9" brakes

Jim Liberty
 

Thank you Jim.     ......Jim.

On Tue, Nov 16, 2021 at 3:56 AM Jim Aschliman <jaschliman@...> wrote:

Attachments:


Re: Rear 9" brakes

Jim Aschliman
 


Re: Rear 9" brakes

Ken Ballein
 




On Nov 13, 2021, at 8:08 PM, Jim Liberty <jimliberty356@...> wrote:


Can someone show me a picture of the rear 9" hydraulic brakes. Especially how the "E" brake parts go together.
  Is there a comprehensive repair manual available.                   ............................Jim.


Rear 9" brakes

Jim Liberty
 

Can someone show me a picture of the rear 9" hydraulic brakes. Especially how the "E" brake parts go together.
  Is there a comprehensive repair manual available.                   ............................Jim.


Lost Another Member - Jack Clem Passed

Jim Bollman
 

Sorry to report the loss of yet another Crosley Club member, Jack Clem. Many of you that have attended the Nationals will know Jack Clem as the creator of several diesels powered Crosleys.


Re: Clarence (Kap) Kapraun has Passed

Gabriel Haddad
 

Thanks for sharing Jim and Butch. Kap will be missed.


Re: Clarence (Kap) Kapraun has Passed

Butch
 

On 10/31/2021 9:20 PM, Jim Bollman wrote:
Here is what Butch posted on Facebook.

"It's with great sadness, I share the sad news, that Clarence Kapraun, more commonly known as KAP, passed away yesterday. For those that know him, KAP needs no introduction.
For those those that don't, KAP was a great guy, a good friend, a long time Crosley enthusiast and a former owner of Service Motors.”
Kap shared with many of us his knowledge and expertise, always fun to talk too at the Nationals. A life long teacher both in the class room and out. He was one of the past editors of the club Quarterly. He will be missed.

Jim...
--
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Re: Clarence (Kap) Kapraun has Passed

Jim Bollman
 


Crosley of the Month

Jim Bollman
 

Here is Novembers CotM enjoy
http://crosleyautoclub.com

Jim...


Clarence (Kap) Kapraun has Passed

Jim Bollman
 

Here is what Butch posted on Facebook.

"It's with great sadness, I share the sad news, that Clarence Kapraun, more commonly known as KAP, passed away yesterday. For those that know him, KAP needs no introduction.
For those those that don't, KAP was a great guy, a good friend, a long time Crosley enthusiast and a former owner of Service Motors.”
Kap shared with many of us his knowledge and expertise, always fun to talk too at the Nationals. A life long teacher both in the class room and out. He was one of the past editors of the club Quarterly. He will be missed.

Jim...


Re: Carburetors

Don Pitchford
 

Andy,
I have not tried an AeroInjector but hope to soon. It is designed for experimental aircraft, but with the right flange adapter I think the 30 H.P. version would be a great carburetor replacement for a Crosley. At $410 plus the adapter and shipping it isn't cheap, but I plan to order one and figure out how to make or modify an adapter over the winter.

Their web site is www.aeroconversions.com/products/aerocarb/index.html


Don Pitchford

On Thursday, October 28, 2021, 11:53:46 AM CDT, Andy Farley <farleya1@...> wrote:


I wanted to follow up on Jim's question. Are there any new carburetors that will fit on a CC or CD?


Re: Carburetors

crosleyshortsport
 


On Thu, Oct 28, 2021, 4:08 PM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
Someone may suggest a new aftermarket carb that can be adapted to the Crosley but the Tillotson and Carter they came with are only available as rebuilds unless you stumble on a NOS which may need rebuilding depending on how it was stored for 70 years.

On Oct 28, 2021, at 12:53 PM, Andy Farley <farleya1@...> wrote:

I wanted to follow up on Jim's question. Are there any new carburetors that will fit on a CC or CD?

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