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Re: Station wagon headliners

Joe Brownsberger
 

I only found 2 support bows in my wagon. I have no idea what a complete set looks like, or how the front is held together. It seems to be a 3 piece head liner with 2 support bows in the middle. Mine are steel, not aluminum. Aluminum to me seems like it will be too soft and may sag. I'm going to keep mine, just thought I'd share for reference.


On Wed, Aug 11, 2021, 7:40 PM Mike S <miso7@...> wrote:
A rod won't work.  The bows are an "H" shaped piece of aluminum that the ends of the cardboard fit into.


Re: Station wagon headliners

Mike S
 

A rod won't work.  The bows are an "H" shaped piece of aluminum that the ends of the cardboard fit into.


Re: Station wagon headliners

Jim Liberty
 

Mike, you can make them from 3/16" rod. McMaster Carr. I am guilty of customizing my restorations on Crosleys. They just "Beg" for upgrades. That said, I keep my 356s dead stock.    ......Jim.

On Wed, Aug 11, 2021 at 2:51 PM Mike S <miso7@...> wrote:
Having now attended 2 conventions at Wauseon, I have been surprised that there is very little consistency in the restorations of our cars.  In particular, I assume (maybe wrongly?) that the wagons came from the factory with a headliner, yet I see very few cars that have them, and very few, if any, have the same type of material for their headliner.  I'm told the headline was in 3 separate pieces.

I talked to Ted at Yankee Parts & he says he has the patterns to make the cardboard headliners (am trying to contact him now).  He says I need to source the aluminum bows that were used between the different sections, as well as the aluminum "hanger strips" for the sides.  I did purchasesome side pieces at Wauseon, as well as a partial original front section of cardboard, but no luck on the bows.  Would anyone have any for sale?
thanks,
Mike S (Fritz)


Station wagon headliners

Mike S
 

Having now attended 2 conventions at Wauseon, I have been surprised that there is very little consistency in the restorations of our cars.  In particular, I assume (maybe wrongly?) that the wagons came from the factory with a headliner, yet I see very few cars that have them, and very few, if any, have the same type of material for their headliner.  I'm told the headline was in 3 separate pieces.

I talked to Ted at Yankee Parts & he says he has the patterns to make the cardboard headliners (am trying to contact him now).  He says I need to source the aluminum bows that were used between the different sections, as well as the aluminum "hanger strips" for the sides.  I did purchasesome side pieces at Wauseon, as well as a partial original front section of cardboard, but no luck on the bows.  Would anyone have any for sale?
thanks,
Mike S (Fritz)


Re: Flashing the regulator

Jim Liberty
 

I have a shut off on my cars. I do not attend to the generator ever after the first time. Sometimes it isn't necessary at all.
                                         ..........................Jim.

On Tue, Aug 10, 2021 at 8:12 PM Andy Farley <farleya1@...> wrote:
I read somewhere that every time you replace the battery you need to flash the voltage regulator. This suggests to me that every time you disconnect the battery you need to flash the voltage voltage regulator. This doesn't seem reasonable to me. I would really appreciate if someone could enlighten me on this subject. 
Thank You in advance.


Re: Flashing the regulator

Jim Bollman
 

Hopefully someone with a better knowledge of such things will jump in if I’m too far off. You don’t flash the voltage regulator you flash the generator to polarize it. As far as I know you only have to do it once when installing a generator that you don’t know is polarized. I have never polarized a generator and have not had any problems that I know of.

Since your next question might be how to polarize a generator? Here is a description I saved from awhile back when it was discussed.

“On our bench test stand, I polarize the generators directly, no regulator involved. The generator is grounded, then flash to the armature terminal of the generator itself, before spinning them for an output test.” Or same results. "Heavy wire between that Bat and the ARM terminals on the regulator. (Not the field terminal!) momentarily."

Jim...

On Aug 10, 2021, at 11:12 PM, Andy Farley <farleya1@...> wrote:

I read somewhere that every time you replace the battery you need to flash the voltage regulator. This suggests to me that every time you disconnect the battery you need to flash the voltage voltage regulator. This doesn't seem reasonable to me. I would really appreciate if someone could enlighten me on this subject. 
Thank You in advance.


Flashing the regulator

Andy Farley
 

I read somewhere that every time you replace the battery you need to flash the voltage regulator. This suggests to me that every time you disconnect the battery you need to flash the voltage voltage regulator. This doesn't seem reasonable to me. I would really appreciate if someone could enlighten me on this subject. 
Thank You in advance.


Re: Tillotson Rebuild.

Jim Liberty
 

I'm with you Rick.    .....Jim.

On Fri, Aug 6, 2021 at 6:06 PM Butch via groups.io <butch46988=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Rick,

NO, never use any type of sealants on carburetor gaskets.
I use and suggest, a SLIGHT touch of anti-seize on all of the brass parts, but that's it.

Butch

On 8/6/2021 4:54 PM, Rick Geithmann wrote:
Hi All.

I am going to be in the process of rebuilding my Tillotson carburetor on my 47 CC.

Since I have not done any type of carburetor work in about 40 years I wanted to ask if I should use any kind of sealant when I install the new gaskets? I have the rebuild kit already , I just want to get it right.

Thanks.

Rick Geithmann
_._,_._

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Tillotson Rebuild.

Butch
 

Rick,

NO, never use any type of sealants on carburetor gaskets.
I use and suggest, a SLIGHT touch of anti-seize on all of the brass parts, but that's it.

Butch

On 8/6/2021 4:54 PM, Rick Geithmann wrote:
Hi All.

I am going to be in the process of rebuilding my Tillotson carburetor on my 47 CC.

Since I have not done any type of carburetor work in about 40 years I wanted to ask if I should use any kind of sealant when I install the new gaskets? I have the rebuild kit already , I just want to get it right.

Thanks.

Rick Geithmann
_._,_._

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Tillotson Rebuild.

Jim Liberty
 

If the mating surfaces are smooth and flat, I do not put any sealant on them.    ....Jim.

On Fri, Aug 6, 2021 at 1:53 PM Rick Geithmann <pzkw-6@...> wrote:
Hi All.

I am going to be in the process of rebuilding my Tillotson carburetor on my 47 CC.

Since I have not done any type of carburetor work in about 40 years I wanted to ask if I should use any kind of sealant when I install the new gaskets? I have the rebuild kit already , I just want to get it right.

Thanks.

Rick Geithmann


Tillotson Rebuild.

Rick Geithmann
 

Hi All.

I am going to be in the process of rebuilding my Tillotson carburetor on my 47 CC.

Since I have not done any type of carburetor work in about 40 years I wanted to ask if I should use any kind of sealant when I install the new gaskets? I have the rebuild kit already , I just want to get it right.

Thanks.

Rick Geithmann


Re: Brake line question

Jim Liberty
 

Don. my '50 Hotshot has disc brakes, but the lines are the same. There should be a keeper inside the "C" frame. On the left side is a bracket for an oil filter. It is a bear to get a tool in there. ............Jim.

On Fri, Aug 6, 2021 at 8:39 AM Don Pitchford via groups.io <w9ebk=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I am working on the brakes on my 51 Hot Shot. It has hydraulic drum brakes. The rubber brake line on the passenger side front is collapsed. I ordered a new one from Service Motors. How do I get the old one out of the frame? It's disconnected from the wheel cylinder and steel brake line but I can't get it out of the hole in the frame. I don't want to go beating on it if there's a keeper that I'm overlooking. Will this be obvious when I have the new one in hand? I looked for info on Youtube and the Crosley Automobile website but didn't find anything about it.
Thanks,
Don Pitchford


Re: Brake line question

Gabriel Haddad
 

I believe there is a snap ring on inside of the frame.


On Fri, Aug 6, 2021, 11:39 AM Don Pitchford via groups.io <w9ebk=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I am working on the brakes on my 51 Hot Shot. It has hydraulic drum brakes. The rubber brake line on the passenger side front is collapsed. I ordered a new one from Service Motors. How do I get the old one out of the frame? It's disconnected from the wheel cylinder and steel brake line but I can't get it out of the hole in the frame. I don't want to go beating on it if there's a keeper that I'm overlooking. Will this be obvious when I have the new one in hand? I looked for info on Youtube and the Crosley Automobile website but didn't find anything about it.
Thanks,
Don Pitchford


Re: Brake line question

crosleyshortsport
 

You should see a "squaure" U shaped keeper holding it. It should have a slightly bent lip on the top side.


On Fri, Aug 6, 2021, 11:39 AM Don Pitchford via groups.io <w9ebk=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I am working on the brakes on my 51 Hot Shot. It has hydraulic drum brakes. The rubber brake line on the passenger side front is collapsed. I ordered a new one from Service Motors. How do I get the old one out of the frame? It's disconnected from the wheel cylinder and steel brake line but I can't get it out of the hole in the frame. I don't want to go beating on it if there's a keeper that I'm overlooking. Will this be obvious when I have the new one in hand? I looked for info on Youtube and the Crosley Automobile website but didn't find anything about it.
Thanks,
Don Pitchford


Brake line question

Don Pitchford
 

I am working on the brakes on my 51 Hot Shot. It has hydraulic drum brakes. The rubber brake line on the passenger side front is collapsed. I ordered a new one from Service Motors. How do I get the old one out of the frame? It's disconnected from the wheel cylinder and steel brake line but I can't get it out of the hole in the frame. I don't want to go beating on it if there's a keeper that I'm overlooking. Will this be obvious when I have the new one in hand? I looked for info on Youtube and the Crosley Automobile website but didn't find anything about it.
Thanks,
Don Pitchford


Re: Tin block motor

fred@...
 
Edited

remember that many tin blocks were put on the shelf because of a leaking bl


Re: Tin block motor

Jim Bollman
 

Price is going to depend a lot on the engines actual condition. Many engines are handed down as rebuilt and a few really are rebuilt beyond cleaning up and paint. Also depends on how complete, as far accessories. Probably doesn’t make a lot of difference in a tin block but the engine number that is on the crankcase behind the distributor will give us an idea of the vintage. A few members do run them in their cars but most these days are display engines. Running display engines are worth more than a static display. If very complete, turns over and can be verified rebuilt I could see $700-$1000, value goes to near zero if stuck and incomplete. If you can get up to where it is sitting take some pictures that will help on condition.

Jim...

On Aug 5, 2021, at 7:00 AM, Ron D. <rdole417@...> wrote:

A friend of mine has a family business, that's been around over 60 years. Crosley's came up in conversation, and my friends mother said that they have had a Crosley engine setting up on a shelf for many many years. She said it was rebuilt, but they never used it. I took a look at it yesterday, but it's up high on some pallet racking. From the ground, I can see it's a tin block engine. I really was hoping for a cast iron block, as it would be going in my car. They are thinking it's time to sell it. I don't know what kind of price to tell them to ask for it. 


Re: Tin block motor

Sam Perley
 

I paid $250 for a tin block that was missing components but essentially all together. You could probably get around $300 I'd assume for a complete. It may be higher, but that's what I would pay for a tin. There's no real use unless you coat the waterlines on the block which isn't easy but is possible. 

Sam 

On Thu, Aug 5, 2021, 07:00 Ron D. <rdole417@...> wrote:
A friend of mine has a family business, that's been around over 60 years. Crosley's came up in conversation, and my friends mother said that they have had a Crosley engine setting up on a shelf for many many years. She said it was rebuilt, but they never used it. I took a look at it yesterday, but it's up high on some pallet racking. From the ground, I can see it's a tin block engine. I really was hoping for a cast iron block, as it would be going in my car. They are thinking it's time to sell it. I don't know what kind of price to tell them to ask for it. 


Tin block motor

Ron D.
 

A friend of mine has a family business, that's been around over 60 years. Crosley's came up in conversation, and my friends mother said that they have had a Crosley engine setting up on a shelf for many many years. She said it was rebuilt, but they never used it. I took a look at it yesterday, but it's up high on some pallet racking. From the ground, I can see it's a tin block engine. I really was hoping for a cast iron block, as it would be going in my car. They are thinking it's time to sell it. I don't know what kind of price to tell them to ask for it. 


Re: Mega Stockpile Of Rare Cars Discovered On Pennsylvania Farm

Ron D.
 

Does anyone have a name or address of this junkyard? I hovered over the town on google maps, but didn't see any 300 acre junkyard.

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