Date   

Re: For Sale: 1950 Hotshot - $1000 - PA

Vespa Roberto
 

Sorry for my english

Do you can send me pictures about your car

Thank you

 

Da: Crosley-Gang@groups.io <Crosley-Gang@groups.io> Per conto di PATRICIA GRITTI
Inviato: lunedì 1 marzo 2021 15:04
A: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Oggetto: Re: [Crosley-Gang] For Sale: 1950 Hotshot - $1000 - PA

 

Hi Jon

Only things I know are missing are the seats and the top.

The car is a Hotshot not a super sport.

Don

 

Sent from my Verizon Motorola Smartphone

On Mar 1, 2021 7:58 AM, PATRICIA GRITTI <donald-gritti@...> wrote:

Crosley 1950 Hotshot for sale. Project car. Has solid body and title. Car is located in Southeast Pa. Asking $1,000.

Call Don, 610 299 4549

 

Sent from my Verizon Motorola Smartphone


Re: For Sale: 1950 Hotshot - $1000 - PA

PATRICIA GRITTI
 

Hi Jon
Only things I know are missing are the seats and the top.
The car is a Hotshot not a super sport.
Don

Sent from my Verizon Motorola Smartphone

On Mar 1, 2021 7:58 AM, PATRICIA GRITTI <donald-gritti@...> wrote:
Crosley 1950 Hotshot for sale. Project car. Has solid body and title. Car is located in Southeast Pa. Asking $1,000.
Call Don, 610 299 4549

Sent from my Verizon Motorola Smartphone


Re: Service Motors Liquidation Sale

dale@servicemotors.net
 

Sorry no


On Mar 1, 2021, at 5:19 AM, Jon Ciauri via groups.io <jlciauri@...> wrote:

Do you have a complete super sport for sale! Jon 909 455 6830


On Feb 11, 2021, at 7:59 AM, dale@... <Dale@...> wrote:

The H Mod has sold and is heading to Alabama.  We still have several good restorable cars.  These are west coast cars with good floors.   Great prices and shippers ready to get your new project to you.  Call for prices.


Re: Service Motors Liquidation Sale

Jon Ciauri
 

Do you have a complete super sport for sale! Jon 909 455 6830


On Feb 11, 2021, at 7:59 AM, dale@... <Dale@...> wrote:

The H Mod has sold and is heading to Alabama.  We still have several good restorable cars.  These are west coast cars with good floors.   Great prices and shippers ready to get your new project to you.  Call for prices.


New Crosley of the Month

Jim Bollman
 

Here is March CotM enjoy. Really need some candidates for future CotM, send me your nominations for consideration. Need two pictures that shows off your candidate. Jim@...

http://crosleyautoclub.com/

Jim...


Re: For Sale: 1950 Hotshot - $1000 - PA

PATRICIA GRITTI
 

Crosley 1950 Hotshot for sale. Project car. Has solid body and title. Car is located in Southeast Pa. Asking $1,000.
Call Don, 610 299 4549

Sent from my Verizon Motorola Smartphone


Re: For Sale: 1950 Hotshot - $1000 - PA

Jim Bollman
 

I changed the Subject line on this ad. please reply to this thread not the Service Motors thread.


For Sale: 1950 Hotshot - $1000 - PA

PATRICIA GRITTI
 

1950 Hotshot for sale. Project car. Has solid body and title. Car is in Southeast Pa. Asking $1,000.
Don @ 610-299-4549

Sent from my Verizon Motorola Smartphone


ForSale: CD Rolling Chassis with 9" Brakes - $600 - OH

Jim Bollman
 

I am located in Lakewood Ohio just 10 minutes West of Cleveland. I’d like to sell it as one piece.  Here are the pics from my yard.  It was under a roof but stored outside.

CD Rolling Chassis with 9" Brakes - $600
Tim Szal <tszal@...>
440-829-8420


Re: Fiat Topolino rearend

 

Actually, it might be valuable to sell and fund replacement. But as much as possible  I want to complete it and really want to use the Topo wheels.


Re: Different styles of fan blades?

Jim Bollman
 

The tin block engines had the adjustment slot for the fan in the block instead of the fan bracket. Not easily used on a cast iron block. 

On Feb 24, 2021, at 3:31 PM, Mike S <miso7@...> wrote:

When I pulled the engine in our 48 wagon for new bearings & ground crank, I noticed that the fan blades had been welded in the past, I assume because of cracks.  I wasn't pleased with this so picked up a used unit from one of our members.  First thing I noticed was the bracket was different, and the position of the blades relative to the centerline of the pulley is a little different.  The gap between the blades and the edge of the pulley is about 3/8" on mine and only 1/8" on the other.  The construction of the blades is different also.  I guess I'll trial fit it before replacing the bearings to make sure there are no issues.  

What models would have a fixed fan with no belt adjustment?
Mike S <2 fans.jpg><2 fans hubs.jpg>


Different styles of fan blades?

Mike S
 

When I pulled the engine in our 48 wagon for new bearings & ground crank, I noticed that the fan blades had been welded in the past, I assume because of cracks.  I wasn't pleased with this so picked up a used unit from one of our members.  First thing I noticed was the bracket was different, and the position of the blades relative to the centerline of the pulley is a little different.  The gap between the blades and the edge of the pulley is about 3/8" on mine and only 1/8" on the other.  The construction of the blades is different also.  I guess I'll trial fit it before replacing the bearings to make sure there are no issues.  

What models would have a fixed fan with no belt adjustment?
Mike S


Re: Roundside Pickup Tailgate Chains

Jim Liberty
 

I'm restoring a '47 Pickup. I would like that input as well. I'm also putting a dual exhaust system on the truck. Luckily the body is off, or I'd never get in installed. Bought a bunch of 1-1/2" tail pipe and fabricated it myself.              ......................Jim.

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 2:43 AM Steve Olinger via groups.io <solinger=rockingham.k12.va.us@groups.io> wrote:
Hi,
       I've seen the subject come up a couple times but with no definite answers on roundside pickup tailgate chains. I know the pickup used the small rear bumpers (most of the time), with that being said did the original chains let the tailgate come all the way down to be level with the bed or just partly down?  Did the chains bolt to the body & tailgate and not to body and tailgate pin? What type of chain did they use?
Thanks & Stay Safe,
Steve


Re: Real Axle Shackle Position

Jim Liberty
 

I'm new to the Crosley world, but have been restoring 356 Porsches for decades. Whatever story you guys tell, I've done much worse.         ........................Jim

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 9:33 AM <parkhunter@...> wrote:

I made the sad mistake of installing the spring over the axle when first assembling my car. In my defense, the car came fully disassembled, so I had no model to go on. 

I thought it sat high in back, but assumed that was because it didn’t have the weight of the gas tank, glass, spare tire, etc. yet. 

Then I took my middle school son and his three large friends for a ride around the block. We went over a bump and CRUNCH! The whole car settled, the shifter moved forward, and we costed the last 20 yards to the garage.

As Tim said, the stress popped the motor mounts and shoved the whole driveline forward. I’m lucky it didn’t make a hole in the radiator, but the fan did create all the cooling fins over in a circular pattern. 

Yikes. Don’t do that. 

-Park


Re: Real Axle Shackle Position

jeff
 

Never mind, the spring in the attached photo is under the axle.

Please disregard my earlier post.



Sent from my jphone


-------- Original message --------
From: jeff <jeffalyon@...>
Date: 2/23/21 9:57 AM (GMT-08:00)
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Real Axle Shackle Position

Park, a few people on this list told me that the correct way is to install the spring higher than the rear axle, as shown in the attached photo.   And you are saying not to install the spring over the rear axle.

Which is correct?

Jeff



Sent from my jphone


-------- Original message --------
From: parkhunter@...
Date: 2/23/21 9:34 AM (GMT-08:00)
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Real Axle Shackle Position

[Edited Message Follows]

I made the sad mistake of installing the spring over the axle when first assembling my car. In my defense, the car came fully disassembled, so I had no model to go on. 

I thought it sat high in back, but assumed that was because it didn’t have the weight of the gas tank, glass, spare tire, etc. yet. 

Then I took my middle school son and his three large friends for a ride around the block. We went over a bump and CRUNCH! The whole car settled, the shifter moved forward, and we coasted the last 20 yards to the garage.

As Tim said, the stress popped the motor mounts and shoved the whole driveline forward. I’m lucky it didn’t make a hole in the radiator, but the fan did crease all the cooling fins over in a circular pattern. 

Yikes. Don’t do that. 

-Park


Re: Real Axle Shackle Position

jeff
 

Park, a few people on this list told me that the correct way is to install the spring higher than the rear axle, as shown in the attached photo.   And you are saying not to install the spring over the rear axle.

Which is correct?

Jeff



Sent from my jphone


-------- Original message --------
From: parkhunter@...
Date: 2/23/21 9:34 AM (GMT-08:00)
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Real Axle Shackle Position

[Edited Message Follows]

I made the sad mistake of installing the spring over the axle when first assembling my car. In my defense, the car came fully disassembled, so I had no model to go on. 

I thought it sat high in back, but assumed that was because it didn’t have the weight of the gas tank, glass, spare tire, etc. yet. 

Then I took my middle school son and his three large friends for a ride around the block. We went over a bump and CRUNCH! The whole car settled, the shifter moved forward, and we coasted the last 20 yards to the garage.

As Tim said, the stress popped the motor mounts and shoved the whole driveline forward. I’m lucky it didn’t make a hole in the radiator, but the fan did crease all the cooling fins over in a circular pattern. 

Yikes. Don’t do that. 

-Park


Re: Real Axle Shackle Position

parkhunter@...
 
Edited

I made the sad mistake of installing the spring over the axle when first assembling my car. In my defense, the car came fully disassembled, so I had no model to go on. 

I thought it sat high in back, but assumed that was because it didn’t have the weight of the gas tank, glass, spare tire, etc. yet. 

Then I took my middle school son and his three large friends for a ride around the block. We went over a bump and CRUNCH! The whole car settled, the shifter moved forward, and we coasted the last 20 yards to the garage.

As Tim said, the stress popped the motor mounts and shoved the whole driveline forward. I’m lucky it didn’t make a hole in the radiator, but the fan did crease all the cooling fins over in a circular pattern. 

Yikes. Don’t do that. 

-Park


Roundside Pickup Tailgate Chains

Steve Olinger
 

Hi,
       I've seen the subject come up a couple times but with no definite answers on roundside pickup tailgate chains. I know the pickup used the small rear bumpers (most of the time), with that being said did the original chains let the tailgate come all the way down to be level with the bed or just partly down?  Did the chains bolt to the body & tailgate and not to body and tailgate pin? What type of chain did they use?
Thanks & Stay Safe,
Steve


Re: Restoration tips for beginners

Gabriel Haddad
 

Thanks for the regen and all the responses on this topic. I have started the teardown process on this HS. Not sure when the resto will start but your tips are much appreciated. 
Thanks

On Wed, Feb 17, 2021, 11:10 PM L.E. Hardee <hftsales@...> wrote:
I want to expand on the "got spark, got gas, got air? It will start."   When I want to check out an engine that hasn't been started in years:  First, I pop off the distributor cap and rotor.  I rotate the engine until the points are fully closed.  Then with the ignition on, I open the points by hand and look for a little sparking between the points.  If I see some, fine go to step 2 but most likely no sparks.  Using a small screwdriver, I ground the moving side of the points to the distributor.  If no sparks, I cjeck the ignition switch or just run a jumper wire from the battery to the ignition side of the coil.  If it sparks to ground but not between the points, I use the screwdriver to rub the point contacts against each other until I see good sparking.  Then I look at the points while cranking the engine over with the distributor cap and rotor off.  I should see regular sparking at the points as the engine rotates and hear the coil popping an high voltage spark.  If you don't have a spark at this point you should check the distributor and coil for problems.  Put the rotor and cap back on the distributor before going to STEP 2:  Gas.  I usually pour a small amount of fresh gas down the carburetor and crank over the engine.  If there is compression, the engine should hit a little.  I have a old lawn mower tank that has an inline valve and a length of gas hose.  I connect the hose to the carb inlet to try a test run of the engine.  Watch out for carb leaks so you can cut off the gas and wait for any gas to evaporate before proceeding to keep from having an engine fire.   I have cranked countless engines using this technique.  I recall a 1960 Lincoln that I brought home from the junk yard where it had sat for years.  In less than an hour after unloading, I was burning rubber with that heavy old car in the driveway just like the get-a-way scene from The Godfather.

On Tue, Feb 16, 2021 at 8:19 PM Tim Hamblen via groups.io <flinttim=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Reminds me of the scene in Sling Blade when all the guys are gathered around a mower that won't run  and Carl asks "Does it have gas , Hmm".


Re: Intake manifold studs

Jim Liberty
 

Good stuff indeed.         ...........Jim.

On Sun, Feb 21, 2021 at 10:47 AM seb fontana via groups.io <speedoo51=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Permatex #1

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