Date   

Re: Hot Shot pops out of gear

Mike P
 

I got the shifter rebuilt, now it stays in 2nd but comes out of 3rd still occasionally.


> The original Crosley shifter, never had a ball and spring, under the "cork plug". That was there just to keep dirt out.
> The only detents were the 1 spring and 2 poppets, located between the two shift rails.

This article shows balls and springs on both sides of the rails, and an egg-shaped object between the rails.
I think the ball and spring under the plug side would help keep it in third if the Crosley bar has an indent on it there.

https://gardentractortalk.com/forums/topic/20841-how-to-repair-a-t92-transmission-shifter-button/


Re: Spark Plugs?

Andy Farley
 

My 48 CC had Delco R43 plugs in it when I got it and seems to run good with them. I'm wondering if running R45 plugs would be better since they are have a higher heat range. 


Re: Restoration tips for beginners

nadno1
 

To add to what others have said , I kept a journal that I wrote in everyday on what I worked on and the hours it took, one suggestion would be to keep a page on things you notice that may need attention when you re-assemble such as a weld that maybe was cracked on a part or something that maybe twisted or bent, these items can be taken care on days when you cant work on other items
Neal


On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 10:37 AM, Ron D.
<rdole417@...> wrote:
Her is a little advice from someone who started the "take apart" part of my car  2 years ago, and am still in that phase. I am cleaning up and painting parts as I go along. Take pics of everything that is not very very obvious. You will think that you will remember, but it's not always true. Take pics from multiple angles of most things, and you will thank yourself later. Pics will help you remember how wires, hoses and linkages were run.  As Jeffery said, ALL small parts go in zip lock bags and labeled with a sharpie. Put bolts back into removed brackets when you can. One thing I am doing is replacing all bolts, with new grade 5 or 8 bolts, nuts and washers, They have a better protective coating and will resist rust way more than grade 2 bolts will. They are cheap when bought in bulk from Tractor Supply. Nylon lock nuts are a nice addition in some places to replace lock washers.

Good luck.


Re: Restoration tips for beginners

Ron D.
 

Her is a little advice from someone who started the "take apart" part of my car  2 years ago, and am still in that phase. I am cleaning up and painting parts as I go along. Take pics of everything that is not very very obvious. You will think that you will remember, but it's not always true. Take pics from multiple angles of most things, and you will thank yourself later. Pics will help you remember how wires, hoses and linkages were run.  As Jeffery said, ALL small parts go in zip lock bags and labeled with a sharpie. Put bolts back into removed brackets when you can. One thing I am doing is replacing all bolts, with new grade 5 or 8 bolts, nuts and washers, They have a better protective coating and will resist rust way more than grade 2 bolts will. They are cheap when bought in bulk from Tractor Supply. Nylon lock nuts are a nice addition in some places to replace lock washers.

Good luck.


Re: Restoration tips for beginners

crosleyshortsport
 

Gabriel,  I used lots of baggies and lots of tags. Label everything !   It took me 2 and 1/2 years to finish the 48 wagon. In that length of time, it is easy to forget what goes where. 


On Sat, Jul 4, 2020, 2:17 PM Gabriel Haddad <super51.g100@...> wrote:
Good info guys! Keep it coming. It's those little lessons that make a big difference.  
Like the brakes I have been working on. The car needed all new wheel cylinders. I thought I could get away with reusing all the lines as and master cylinder.  Nope! Not worth the risk. I am replacing it all.
Thanks again.

On Sat, Jul 4, 2020, 12:32 PM Don Pitchford via groups.io <w9ebk=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Gabriel,
A digital camera and some lights on stands to make really good photos are your best friends. Also, write notes on paper tags or tape and attach them to the parts so they show up in the photos. In the old days we had to rely on drawings and memory. We have it so easy today with digital photos. I recommend getting a camera that you don't mind getting dirty because sometimes your hands are going to be filthy when you pick up the camera to take a picture of something. Regularly email those photos between 2 of your email accounts  or do some other kind of back-up so you don't loose the photos. 

If you have an oxygen/acetylene or MAP gas/oxygen torch that you can use to heat up fasteners it will help a great deal with loosening stuck nuts and bolts. Without heating them,  a lot of nut and bolt heads will round off or break. Heating them to just shy of Red, then letting them cool a bit loosens them so they come right out. Just be sure there is no gas or oil in the area. Keep a bucket of water with a wet rag, and a fire extinguisher handy just in case. 

Buy a good tap and die set or "thread chaser" so you can clean up the threads on everything! It's impossible to know how well a fastener is torqued unless you have clean, smooth, and lightly lubricated threads. I often take an assembly off the car in pieces, then reassemble it and set it aside until I'm ready to do a thorough cleaning and restoration to it. Cleaning up the threads as you are reassembling it for the first time makes life a lot easier. 

Good luck and keep us updated,
Don Pitchford

On Friday, July 3, 2020, 08:33:10 PM CDT, Gabriel Haddad <super51.g100@...> wrote:


Hello all, 
I know there is a lot of information out there for fixing and repairing Crosley parts.  There are even a few publications for restoration.  As I approach my first attempt at a full blown restoration of a car, I have to wonder what are the simple things people would have liked to know before they started their restoration? I mean some of the real simple things. 
As I was wrenching on a car this last weekend,  I complained to myself how greasy the underside was. Why didn't I take a power washer to it first!! 
What about tips for pulling the old wiring? Did you wish you knew something before stared tearing something apart or, before you began assembling something? 
Thanks to all of you and I hope you all have a great 4th of July. 
I hope to see you all next year.
Thanks,  gabriel. 


Re: Restoration tips for beginners

Gabriel Haddad
 

Good info guys! Keep it coming. It's those little lessons that make a big difference.  
Like the brakes I have been working on. The car needed all new wheel cylinders. I thought I could get away with reusing all the lines as and master cylinder.  Nope! Not worth the risk. I am replacing it all.
Thanks again.

On Sat, Jul 4, 2020, 12:32 PM Don Pitchford via groups.io <w9ebk=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Gabriel,
A digital camera and some lights on stands to make really good photos are your best friends. Also, write notes on paper tags or tape and attach them to the parts so they show up in the photos. In the old days we had to rely on drawings and memory. We have it so easy today with digital photos. I recommend getting a camera that you don't mind getting dirty because sometimes your hands are going to be filthy when you pick up the camera to take a picture of something. Regularly email those photos between 2 of your email accounts  or do some other kind of back-up so you don't loose the photos. 

If you have an oxygen/acetylene or MAP gas/oxygen torch that you can use to heat up fasteners it will help a great deal with loosening stuck nuts and bolts. Without heating them,  a lot of nut and bolt heads will round off or break. Heating them to just shy of Red, then letting them cool a bit loosens them so they come right out. Just be sure there is no gas or oil in the area. Keep a bucket of water with a wet rag, and a fire extinguisher handy just in case. 

Buy a good tap and die set or "thread chaser" so you can clean up the threads on everything! It's impossible to know how well a fastener is torqued unless you have clean, smooth, and lightly lubricated threads. I often take an assembly off the car in pieces, then reassemble it and set it aside until I'm ready to do a thorough cleaning and restoration to it. Cleaning up the threads as you are reassembling it for the first time makes life a lot easier. 

Good luck and keep us updated,
Don Pitchford

On Friday, July 3, 2020, 08:33:10 PM CDT, Gabriel Haddad <super51.g100@...> wrote:


Hello all, 
I know there is a lot of information out there for fixing and repairing Crosley parts.  There are even a few publications for restoration.  As I approach my first attempt at a full blown restoration of a car, I have to wonder what are the simple things people would have liked to know before they started their restoration? I mean some of the real simple things. 
As I was wrenching on a car this last weekend,  I complained to myself how greasy the underside was. Why didn't I take a power washer to it first!! 
What about tips for pulling the old wiring? Did you wish you knew something before stared tearing something apart or, before you began assembling something? 
Thanks to all of you and I hope you all have a great 4th of July. 
I hope to see you all next year.
Thanks,  gabriel. 


Re: Spark Plugs?

seb fontana
 

I found some Atlas 463 plugs that work good. Extended reach, proper thread length, clears pistons and combustion chamber; at least in my engine. Stay pretty clean burning. Heat could be one or two steps cooler and would probably work ok, couple steps hotter for some oil use. Seb.


Re: Restoration tips for beginners

Don Pitchford
 

Gabriel,
A digital camera and some lights on stands to make really good photos are your best friends. Also, write notes on paper tags or tape and attach them to the parts so they show up in the photos. In the old days we had to rely on drawings and memory. We have it so easy today with digital photos. I recommend getting a camera that you don't mind getting dirty because sometimes your hands are going to be filthy when you pick up the camera to take a picture of something. Regularly email those photos between 2 of your email accounts  or do some other kind of back-up so you don't loose the photos. 

If you have an oxygen/acetylene or MAP gas/oxygen torch that you can use to heat up fasteners it will help a great deal with loosening stuck nuts and bolts. Without heating them,  a lot of nut and bolt heads will round off or break. Heating them to just shy of Red, then letting them cool a bit loosens them so they come right out. Just be sure there is no gas or oil in the area. Keep a bucket of water with a wet rag, and a fire extinguisher handy just in case. 

Buy a good tap and die set or "thread chaser" so you can clean up the threads on everything! It's impossible to know how well a fastener is torqued unless you have clean, smooth, and lightly lubricated threads. I often take an assembly off the car in pieces, then reassemble it and set it aside until I'm ready to do a thorough cleaning and restoration to it. Cleaning up the threads as you are reassembling it for the first time makes life a lot easier. 

Good luck and keep us updated,
Don Pitchford

On Friday, July 3, 2020, 08:33:10 PM CDT, Gabriel Haddad <super51.g100@...> wrote:


Hello all, 
I know there is a lot of information out there for fixing and repairing Crosley parts.  There are even a few publications for restoration.  As I approach my first attempt at a full blown restoration of a car, I have to wonder what are the simple things people would have liked to know before they started their restoration? I mean some of the real simple things. 
As I was wrenching on a car this last weekend,  I complained to myself how greasy the underside was. Why didn't I take a power washer to it first!! 
What about tips for pulling the old wiring? Did you wish you knew something before stared tearing something apart or, before you began assembling something? 
Thanks to all of you and I hope you all have a great 4th of July. 
I hope to see you all next year.
Thanks,  gabriel. 


Re: Restoration tips for beginners

Richard Williams
 

Don't forget to either clean or replace your dimmer switch. On my 48 with 6v it made a big difference.


Re: Restoration tips for beginners

Dennis Terdy
 

Gabriel,
Great request! I am not an expert in the least, but here are a few comments about rewiring:
I did not buy new harnesses, so the following is what I did to save several dollars and still have a fully functioning Crosley electrical system: 

1. In rewiring 2 Crosleys (1947 and 1952), I did not remove all wires at once and try to follow an impossible-to-read schematic from the manual. I also enlarged the schematic on 8.5 X 14" paper to be more functional.  
2. I bought appropriately guaged multi colored wiring and pulled each wire one-by-one to its location. Once the wire was installed I double-checked where it was in the schematic. The '47 was easy because there were no turn signals and very "primitive" electric e.g. single tail light with brake switch. The '52 was tricky because the aftermarket bright light and turn signal set up was not intuitive and needed to be experimented with a bit to work.
3. I made sure I had a good supply of new 6V bulbs with extras.
4. I bought a large wiring kit with push-ons, connectors, etc. 
4. I tried to save any existing electrical components, grommets, sockets, etc just in case I could not replace the originals. (This worked very well in each car's case especially with headlights and any front lighting on the '52)
4. In the end, I added boots around long running wires (e.g. to the rear) and zip strips as ties once I knew that set of wires was installed and functioning. 

I hope this will be useful to you. Good Luck.

Dennis



On Fri, Jul 3, 2020 at 8:33 PM Gabriel Haddad <super51.g100@...> wrote:
Hello all, 
I know there is a lot of information out there for fixing and repairing Crosley parts.  There are even a few publications for restoration.  As I approach my first attempt at a full blown restoration of a car, I have to wonder what are the simple things people would have liked to know before they started their restoration? I mean some of the real simple things. 
As I was wrenching on a car this last weekend,  I complained to myself how greasy the underside was. Why didn't I take a power washer to it first!! 
What about tips for pulling the old wiring? Did you wish you knew something before stared tearing something apart or, before you began assembling something? 
Thanks to all of you and I hope you all have a great 4th of July. 
I hope to see you all next year.
Thanks,  gabriel. 



--
Dennis Terdy


Re: Transmission pops out of gear

Jim Bollman
 

Does it pop out when you are coasting on level ground or only when going down a hill? I have had and have several old cars, not just Crosleys and a tractor that pops out of gear if I try coasting down a hill letting the engine break me. I just got use to resting my hand on the shifter in those situations. One a 50 Ford truck had just had the transmission fully rebuilt, shifted great but you had to hold in gear engine breaking down a hill. Not saying this should be normal but not uncommon.

On Jul 3, 2020, at 9:31 PM, Mike P via groups.io <analogmike@...> wrote:

I will check alignment, don't want to remove the engine or trans so I don't think
I can get to the pilot bushing.

I found rebuild info for the shifter on garden tractor talk(!)

https://gardentractortalk.com/forums/topic/20841-how-to-repair-a-t92-transmission-shifter-button/



Restoration tips for beginners

Gabriel Haddad
 

Hello all, 
I know there is a lot of information out there for fixing and repairing Crosley parts.  There are even a few publications for restoration.  As I approach my first attempt at a full blown restoration of a car, I have to wonder what are the simple things people would have liked to know before they started their restoration? I mean some of the real simple things. 
As I was wrenching on a car this last weekend,  I complained to myself how greasy the underside was. Why didn't I take a power washer to it first!! 
What about tips for pulling the old wiring? Did you wish you knew something before stared tearing something apart or, before you began assembling something? 
Thanks to all of you and I hope you all have a great 4th of July. 
I hope to see you all next year.
Thanks,  gabriel. 


Re: Transmission pops out of gear

Mike P
 

I will check alignment, don't want to remove the engine or trans so I don't think
I can get to the pilot bushing.

I found rebuild info for the shifter on garden tractor talk(!)

https://gardentractortalk.com/forums/topic/20841-how-to-repair-a-t92-transmission-shifter-button/


Re: Spark Plugs?

Tim Hamblen
 

J8 or J8C Champions


Re: Transmission pops out of gear

Matt Tritt
 

Not sure why it does, and I’m afraid of causing problems for people with vintage small farm machinery, but Economy Power King tractors use Crosley transmissions and differentials. Since the differentials are powering portal axles, there’s very little stress on the working parts. I’ve never heard of any transmission or diff problems with Power Kings, so you might consider watching out for them on the garden tractor discussion sites. 

On Wed, Jul 1, 2020 at 4:49 PM Mike P via groups.io <analogmike=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
HI,

My '51 Hot Shot wouldn't stay in 2nd or 3rd gear when I got it.

I was told the shifter poppets were bad so sent it to Butch who did a nice
job with it. Now it stays in second but still pops out of third when coasting.
The 3rd gear poppet is not as stiff as the other shifter assembly
I have, but the other one won't go into 2nd at all and 1st is really weird...

The gears look fine.

Any ideas how to get it to stay in third gear??

--
Matt Tritt
14160 El Camino Real
Atascadero, California 93422
805 466 6825
Wind and Solar Energy Consulting Services
Direct Sales of Small Wind Turbines and Solar Pumps


Re: Transmission pops out of gear

seb fontana
 

check bell housing alinement and trans pilot bushing for wear.


Transmission pops out of gear

Mike P
 

HI,

My '51 Hot Shot wouldn't stay in 2nd or 3rd gear when I got it.

I was told the shifter poppets were bad so sent it to Butch who did a nice
job with it. Now it stays in second but still pops out of third when coasting.
The 3rd gear poppet is not as stiff as the other shifter assembly
I have, but the other one won't go into 2nd at all and 1st is really weird...

The gears look fine.

Any ideas how to get it to stay in third gear??


Re: Spark Plugs?

Spock Arnold
 

I just order them from our vendors and take what they send!

On Jul 1, 2020 4:43 PM, Mike S <miso7@...> wrote:
What  type spark plugs are most of you running these days in a ciba motor?  


Spark Plugs?

Mike S
 

What  type spark plugs are most of you running these days in a ciba motor?  


Re: 1952 Crosley CD Grease points diagram

 

Thanx. That is perfect.

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