Date   
Re: Trailer tie down locations

Ron D.
 

Anyone have some pics of the frame mounted tie downs? It's always best to see a few ideas, before making something permanent.

Re: Question about installing new brake linings on a 47

Tim Hamblen
 

It's not an issue of making the shoes "fit" the drum, in other words making the curve of the shoes match the curve of the drum. The shoes pivot on a single point and when pressed will only contact a small area of the shoe/drum . We tend to think the shoes are pressed from their centers out and that's not the case.They only move at the top or the bottom depending on the application.This is why you need to grind the shoes so they are thicker in one area and thinner in others.

Re: Gauge Bezel Removal

crosleyshortsport
 

When I did the round cluster guage and speedometer restoration, I was also trying to figure out the best way to get them apart. I started with the speedometer because I had two of them, I figured to learn on one and do the next one properly. I started on the flat bench and used a 12 inch square piece of dense carpet pad. I then laid the speedometer glass down on the pad. I realized that the chrome bezel must have been pressed on and crimped with a machine. I used a 10 inch older flat blade screw driver and ground the blade down very thin. I then held the speedo very tightly with one hand as I worked the blade between the bezel and the housing. Slowly I turned the blade sideways to force the bezel outward, it causes the backside of your bezel to be jagged and pointed out every quarter inch or so. It will take about a half hour or so to get all the way around, and then you may need to go around again to open a bit further. Then be careful to remove, as you do not want to break the glass. If the bezel needs to be rechromed, send it out. Now you can restore everything inside by re-painting and with new decals from our clubs fine suppliers. Once you have the inside restored, now you need to get that bezel back on. I used my bench vise, and here is how I did it. You do not want to mar the bezels chrome finish, so I started by covering the vise jaws with plastic electrical tape, I believe I used 4 layers of tape on each jaw, and I stretched them on so they would not move. I screwed the vise jaws in so they were approximately one quarter inch open, and maybe even three eighths to start with, I then placed the glass on the housing, and set the bezel back in place. I then placed the bezel on end at one side of the vise jaws. Now put presser on the top of the bezel with one hand and roll the bezel slowly across the jaws of the vise. You should now see all your jagged edges closing in on the housing. Now keep closing the jaws a bit at a time, and then rolling with pressure. It should take about four times around to completely close it up as it once was. Hope this helps, I did end up restoring both speedometers at the same time, they both came out very well.  Jeffrey Ackerman


On Fri, Oct 18, 2019, 12:47 AM Plandersen <pkandersen@...> wrote:
How do you personal message someone?  Kent

Kent Andersen
PO Box 364
Royal City, WA  99357

Phone 509-346-1500
Fax 509-346-1540
Cell 509-760-5881
Email pkandersen@...





On Oct 17, 2019, at 8:53 PM, SteveC <stevecournoyer@...> wrote:

So...back to the subject please. Dave I PM'd you. Haven't heard back. 

Re: Gauge Bezel Removal

Spock Arnold
 

Im sorry it took me so long.  I was in Hershey and then came back home to a few minor disasters.  Here are the instructions


On Thursday, October 17, 2019, 11:54:02 PM EDT, SteveC <stevecournoyer@...> wrote:


So...back to the subject please. Dave I PM'd you. Haven't heard back. 

Re: Gauge Bezel Removal

Spock Arnold
 

Ill try to get your parts out tomorrow.

On Wednesday, October 16, 2019, 10:47:41 AM EDT, Plandersen <pkandersen@...> wrote:


Dave we had talked about trading a radio for a flywheel cover and wiring harness.  Are you still interested?  Kent

Kent Andersen
PO Box 364
Royal City, WA  99357

Phone 509-346-1500
Fax 509-346-1540
Cell 509-760-5881
Email pkandersen@...





On Oct 16, 2019, at 3:59 AM, Spock Arnold via Groups.Io <tmkldwwj@...> wrote:

Steve, send me a PM and I'll give you instructions
Dave Anspach 

On Oct 16, 2019 1:01 AM, SteveC <stevecournoyer@...> wrote:
Round speedo and round multi/combination gauge: I need to disassemble mine to clean the gauge faces and glass. How do I remove the bezels? Are they supposed to rotate and pull off? Do I have to pry the backside of the bezels open? 


Re: Question about installing new brake linings on a 47

Gene Smith
 

I noticed several brake shoe grinders for sale on ebay starting at less than $200. Also a whole bunch of manuals for various models of same.
~Gene Smith~

On Oct 18, 2019, at 5:40 AM, Tim Hamblen via Groups.Io <flinttim@...> wrote:

It's not an issue of making the shoes "fit" the drum, in other words making the curve of the shoes match the curve of the drum. The shoes pivot on a single point and when pressed will only contact a small area of the shoe/drum . We tend to think the shoes are pressed from their centers out and that's not the case.They only move at the top or the bottom depending on the application.This is why you need to grind the shoes so they are thicker in one area and thinner in others.

Re: Question about installing new brake linings on a 47

STEVE LAMKEN
 

The shoes and the drum are both put on the brake lathe and turned at the same time. You may have other ways of doing it but thats how it was done in every shop I worked at in my 46 year career.

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


From: Crosley-Gang@groups.io <Crosley-Gang@groups.io> on behalf of Gene Smith <e.llewellyn.smith@...>
Sent: Friday, October 18, 2019 3:05:59 PM
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io <Crosley-Gang@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Question about installing new brake linings on a 47
 
I noticed several brake shoe grinders for sale on ebay starting at less than $200. Also a whole bunch of manuals for various models of same.
~Gene Smith~

On Oct 18, 2019, at 5:40 AM, Tim Hamblen via Groups.Io <flinttim@...> wrote:

It's not an issue of making the shoes "fit" the drum, in other words making the curve of the shoes match the curve of the drum. The shoes pivot on a single point and when pressed will only contact a small area of the shoe/drum . We tend to think the shoes are pressed from their centers out and that's not the case.They only move at the top or the bottom depending on the application.This is why you need to grind the shoes so they are thicker in one area and thinner in others.

Re: Question about installing new brake linings on a 47

Butch
 

Uh,

How do you turn shoes, on a brake lathe? I've worked in a lot of shops, owned a couple of brake lathes, including Ammco and Accuturn. Neither were equipped in any way, to touch a brake shoe.

We turned the drum, to clean it up, then measured the drum, mounted the shoes (one at a time) in the arcing machine and matched them to the drum.

Butch

On 10/18/2019 7:00 PM, STEVE LAMKEN wrote:
The shoes and the drum are both put on the brake lathe and turned at the same time. You may have other ways of doing it but thats how it was done in every shop I worked at in my 46 year career.



Virus-free. www.avast.com

Re: Question about installing new brake linings on a 47

STEVE LAMKEN
 

The brake lathe has a spindle on each end you mount the drum on one end and the shoes on the other end. You cut both at the same time. You won't see these in small shops these machaines run thousands of dollars.



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy Tablet


-------- Original message --------
From: "Butch via Groups.Io" <butch46988@...>
Date: 10/18/19 5:32 PM (GMT-07:00)
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Question about installing new brake linings on a 47

Uh,

How do you turn shoes, on a brake lathe? I've worked in a lot of shops, owned a couple of brake lathes, including Ammco and Accuturn. Neither were equipped in any way, to touch a brake shoe.

We turned the drum, to clean it up, then measured the drum, mounted the shoes (one at a time) in the arcing machine and matched them to the drum.

Butch

On 10/18/2019 7:00 PM, STEVE LAMKEN wrote:
The shoes and the drum are both put on the brake lathe and turned at the same time. You may have other ways of doing it but thats how it was done in every shop I worked at in my 46 year career.



Virus-free. www.avast.com

Useless dipstick?!

parkhunter@...
 

Changed the oil on my 1948 CoBra before putting it to bed for the winter. In the process, I remembered just how useless the dipstick is. 


It’s a brass rod, bent into a loop at the end, and with a scored mark that I assume is the high level for the oil. But clean oil is invisible on the shiny brass dipstick. I usually end up touching it with my finger trying to figure out where it’s actually wet. 


At first I thought this must be a homemade part, but then I noticed a part number (1 ZN-C and a wing?) stamped at the very bottom. 


I suppose if I let the oil get dirty it would show up. But I’m wondering if others have this problem, and what you’ve done to solve it. 


- Park

Re: Useless dipstick?!

Jim Bollman
 

Never saw a brass dip stick before, wonder how long they used those.

On Oct 19, 2019, at 5:20 PM, parkhunter@... wrote:

Changed the oil on my 1948 CoBra before putting it to bed for the winter. In the process, I remembered just how useless the dipstick is. 


It’s a brass rod, bent into a loop at the end, and with a scored mark that I assume is the high level for the oil. But clean oil is invisible on the shiny brass dipstick. I usually end up touching it with my finger trying to figure out where it’s actually wet. 


At first I thought this must be a homemade part, but then I noticed a part number (1 ZN-C and a wing?) stamped at the very bottom. 


I suppose if I let the oil get dirty it would show up. But I’m wondering if others have this problem, and what you’ve done to solve it. 


- Park

<89178E05-E7CB-4148-B628-894C97529016.jpeg><01DF44E2-0C1E-48F5-80B3-DDD2C3061042.jpeg><1EA2729C-9047-4077-8337-AF9EFE6BB11E.jpeg>


Re: Useless dipstick?!

crosleyshortsport
 

Park,   A good bright light works well to see the wet oil. Or get a younger helper with a good set of eyes to help out 😀

On Sat, Oct 19, 2019, 5:27 PM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
Never saw a brass dip stick before, wonder how long they used those.

On Oct 19, 2019, at 5:20 PM, parkhunter@... wrote:

Changed the oil on my 1948 CoBra before putting it to bed for the winter. In the process, I remembered just how useless the dipstick is. 


It’s a brass rod, bent into a loop at the end, and with a scored mark that I assume is the high level for the oil. But clean oil is invisible on the shiny brass dipstick. I usually end up touching it with my finger trying to figure out where it’s actually wet. 


At first I thought this must be a homemade part, but then I noticed a part number (1 ZN-C and a wing?) stamped at the very bottom. 


I suppose if I let the oil get dirty it would show up. But I’m wondering if others have this problem, and what you’ve done to solve it. 


- Park

<89178E05-E7CB-4148-B628-894C97529016.jpeg><01DF44E2-0C1E-48F5-80B3-DDD2C3061042.jpeg><1EA2729C-9047-4077-8337-AF9EFE6BB11E.jpeg>


Re: Useless dipstick?!

Richard Williams
 

You need the proper water pipe above the oil stick. Then you can use it. 

On Saturday, October 19, 2019, 02:56:12 PM PDT, crosleyshortsport <crosleyshortsport@...> wrote:


Park,   A good bright light works well to see the wet oil. Or get a younger helper with a good set of eyes to help out 😀
On Sat, Oct 19, 2019, 5:27 PM Jim Bollman <Jim@...> wrote:
Never saw a brass dip stick before, wonder how long they used those.

On Oct 19, 2019, at 5:20 PM, parkhunter@... wrote:

Changed the oil on my 1948 CoBra before putting it to bed for the winter. In the process, I remembered just how useless the dipstick is. 


It’s a brass rod, bent into a loop at the end, and with a scored mark that I assume is the high level for the oil. But clean oil is invisible on the shiny brass dipstick. I usually end up touching it with my finger trying to figure out where it’s actually wet. 


At first I thought this must be a homemade part, but then I noticed a part number (1 ZN-C and a wing?) stamped at the very bottom. 


I suppose if I let the oil get dirty it would show up. But I’m wondering if others have this problem, and what you’ve done to solve it. 


- Park

<89178E05-E7CB-4148-B628-894C97529016.jpeg><01DF44E2-0C1E-48F5-80B3-DDD2C3061042.jpeg><1EA2729C-9047-4077-8337-AF9EFE6BB11E.jpeg>


Re: Useless dipstick?!

parkhunter@...
 

I assume you are referring to my kludged coolant pipe with a PVC elbow. That actually doesn’t get in the way of the dipstick, although I do need to replace it. 


The dipstick itself drops nicely into a hole behind the starter. 

- Park

Re: Useless dipstick?!

Ron D.
 

Park, I cannot offer any advice on the dipstick problem, but I must comment on the beautifully clean looking engine compartment. Keep up the great work. 

Re: Useless dipstick?!

Butch
 

Park,

Drilling small holes thru it, at the appropriate locations, will help with visibility.

Butch

On 10/20/2019 7:11 AM, Ron D. wrote:
Park, I cannot offer any advice on the dipstick problem, but I must comment on the beautifully clean looking engine compartment. Keep up the great work.??
_._,_._,_

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Re: Question about installing new brake linings on a 47

seb fontana
 

I had my 47' brake shoes relined with thicker material and clamped them onto respective backing plated each mounted on the metal lathe I have and turned to size after I had turned the drums..Funny note on the drums; while it looked like the drums had been turned [with a hatchet] but were still .020 under 6"..I managed to tru the bearing area and taper area to w/in .002 and got the drums to clean at +.020...

Re: Over Heating

Andy Farley
 

I've been having overheating. I put in the air dams, backflushed the block and radiator, installed a thermostat ( there wasn't one), and I still had overheating. I counted the fins in the radiator and found it to be 7 fins per inch. I know I still need to check the timing and carb adjustment but I didn't want to smoke the engine before I got everything fine tuned so I installed an auxiliary fan in front of the radiator with a 140 degree temp switch mounted on the radiator. Fired it up and about the time the block got up to 220 degrees the aux fan kicked in and the temp dropped down to mid scale on on the Dash. The block temp dropped down to about 180 degrees. I'm making progress. I'm very thankful for all of the great information that everyone has posted. I would be lost without you.

Re: Over Heating

Barry Smedley
 

Did you take off the side plates and clean the gunk out of the block?

 

From: Crosley-Gang@groups.io [mailto:Crosley-Gang@groups.io] On Behalf Of Andy Farley
Sent: Monday, October 21, 2019 3:50 AM
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Over Heating

 

I've been having overheating. I put in the air dams, backflushed the block and radiator, installed a thermostat ( there wasn't one), and I still had overheating. I counted the fins in the radiator and found it to be 7 fins per inch. I know I still need to check the timing and carb adjustment but I didn't want to smoke the engine before I got everything fine tuned so I installed an auxiliary fan in front of the radiator with a 140 degree temp switch mounted on the radiator. Fired it up and about the time the block got up to 220 degrees the aux fan kicked in and the temp dropped down to mid scale on on the Dash. The block temp dropped down to about 180 degrees. I'm making progress. I'm very thankful for all of the great information that everyone has posted. I would be lost without you.

This message contains confidential information intended solely for the use of the addressee(s) named above. Any review, disclosure, distribution, copying or use of the information by others is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please advise the sender by immediate reply and delete the original message. (English) Ce message contient des informations confidentielles destinées uniquement à l'usage du(des) destinataire(s) nommé(s) ci-dessus. Toute consultation, distribution, copie et utilisation du contenu de ce message est strictement prohibée. Si vous avez reçu ce message par erreur, SVP avisez l'expéditeur par réponse immédiate et effacez le message original. (French)

Re: Over Heating

Richard Williams
 

Do you have the baffles in on both sides of the radiator? My 48 ran hot till I put them in. Also there is one in the top of the hood as well. These make the air pass through the radiator rather than around it. I also rodded out the cores too. My 48 now stays at mid range on the gauge. Rich W.

On Monday, October 21, 2019, 02:36:26 AM PDT, Barry Smedley <BSmedley@...> wrote:


Did you take off the side plates and clean the gunk out of the block?

 

From: Crosley-Gang@groups.io [mailto:Crosley-Gang@groups.io] On Behalf Of Andy Farley
Sent: Monday, October 21, 2019 3:50 AM
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Over Heating

 

I've been having overheating. I put in the air dams, backflushed the block and radiator, installed a thermostat ( there wasn't one), and I still had overheating. I counted the fins in the radiator and found it to be 7 fins per inch. I know I still need to check the timing and carb adjustment but I didn't want to smoke the engine before I got everything fine tuned so I installed an auxiliary fan in front of the radiator with a 140 degree temp switch mounted on the radiator. Fired it up and about the time the block got up to 220 degrees the aux fan kicked in and the temp dropped down to mid scale on on the Dash. The block temp dropped down to about 180 degrees. I'm making progress. I'm very thankful for all of the great information that everyone has posted. I would be lost without you.

This message contains confidential information intended solely for the use of the addressee(s) named above. Any review, disclosure, distribution, copying or use of the information by others is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please advise the sender by immediate reply and delete the original message. (English) Ce message contient des informations confidentielles destinées uniquement à l'usage du(des) destinataire(s) nommé(s) ci-dessus. Toute consultation, distribution, copie et utilisation du contenu de ce message est strictement prohibée. Si vous avez reçu ce message par erreur, SVP avisez l'expéditeur par réponse immédiate et effacez le message original. (French)