Date   

Re: Bring the heat!

paul
 

Park,
trying to find a decent one could be rough, but I know that by at least 55 Dodges (all MoPars) had pretty decent heaters and electric wipers. learned to drive in Dad's 55 Plymouth Belvedere 2 dr ht. V8, 3 on the tree, wish I had it today. as to the 62 Darts, not quite as ugly as the 62 Plymouth but a ton of fun, I tried to beat 3 of them to death and couldn't succeed. 2 handshakers and a pushbutton, 2 were 318s and 1 slant 6. can't say about Fords of the era , but through at least 58 Chevys still had vacuum wipers, probably all of GM's offerings. in line behind my next Crosley project is a 52 Imperial 2 dr ht, a tank with real bumpers, anybody need a running 331 hemi?
nobody has mentioned Lt Columbo's Borgward have they and the REO trucks, add the Divco milk trucks and the neat little Metro Mite delivery panel vans. I think an Eshelman would barely fit inside one, maybe....
bring on the warm weather, my 50 Hot Shot needs limbering up. Paul Rinehart in Ohio

On 2/24/2017 9:07 AM, parkhunter@gmail.com wrote:

Since we're on the Way Back machine, let me ask another question for those with long memories...

My 48 Crosley and my 48 and 49 Plymouths all had the same heating system - a little hot water toaster bolted to the firewall barely able to warm the passenger' toes and thaw the bottom inch of the windshield. (I know because I used to drive my 48 Plymouth year-round through northern Indiana winters back in the late 80s).


Bring the heat!

parkhunter@...
 

Since we're on the Way Back machine, let me ask another  question for those with long memories...

My 48 Crosley and my 48 and 49 Plymouths all had the same heating system - a little hot water toaster bolted to the firewall barely able to warm the passenger' toes and thaw the bottom inch of the windshield. (I know because I used to drive my 48 Plymouth year-round through northern Indiana winters back in the late 80s).

I also owned a 1960 Rambler with a Weather Eye heater capable of melting my boots off, and a 1962 Dodge Dart with an adequate heater/defroster, if not up to the Rambler's standard. 

So my question is... when during the 1950s did various car companies get decent heating systems? I know Nash's Weather Eye debuted circa 1939 and set the pattern, but when did other car makers get on board? At Chrysler Inc. it was clearly sometime between 1949 and 1962.

Secondary question - how did the heat compare in various brands?

This is not a theoretical question. My teenager is looking for a daily driver from the '50s or '60s that can cope with Wisconsin winters. 

He caught the old car bug from my Crosley but is smart enough to look for something more practical.  :^) 

Thanks!

Park


Re: What happened to Crosley

Terrance Robinson
 

Studebaker Hawk, Lark, Scotsman, Chanp truck, not to mention the foreign glut like Toyopet, Lloyd, Gogommobile, Dyna Panard, Citroen 2CV, Simca, Fiat 500, and other British --Morris Minor 1000 (only British car to reach 1 million units), Humber Hawk, Hilman, MG , Triumph Herald,, Sprite, VW, ETC ETC--Terry 

On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 9:31 AM, Terrance Robinson <tarobinson44@...> wrote:
Pontiac,Oldsmobile,Hornet,Gremlin,Ambassador, Pacer---terry

On Wed, Feb 22, 2017 at 1:42 PM, crosleyshortsport <crosleyshortsport@...> wrote:
Anyone remember the eshelman?



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Terrance Robinson <tarobinson44@...>
Date: 2/22/17 5:18 PM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] What happened to Crosley

Hudson, Nash, Rambler, Plymouth, Desoto, Imperial, Mercury, Continental, Edsel. Packard, King Midget, Willys, Kaiser Darrin,Jeep

Terry

On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 9:46 AM, Roy McLaurin via Groups.Io <oroyme@...> wrote:

I am 63 and remember other car brands as a boy. Like  Fraiser, Tucker, Henry J,  Kaiser, Studebaker.  Can you name anymore? 




--
Hurt not the Earth neither the Sea. Nor the Trees.                         Revelation 7:3  
"A people that values its privileges above its principles soon loses both."   
                                                                            President Dwight D. Eisenhower 
"The only thing to buy on credit is your casket."                       James A Michener
Debt is "anything that you pay today for yesterday's living"              Ruth Hayden
A model of Christian Charity: "We are all responsible (institutions and individuals)    to each other and to serve the common good"              Gov. John Winthrop 1630




--
Hurt not the Earth neither the Sea. Nor the Trees.                         Revelation 7:3  
"A people that values its privileges above its principles soon loses both."   
                                                                            President Dwight D. Eisenhower 
"The only thing to buy on credit is your casket."                       James A Michener
Debt is "anything that you pay today for yesterday's living"              Ruth Hayden
A model of Christian Charity: "We are all responsible (institutions and individuals)    to each other and to serve the common good"              Gov. John Winthrop 1630




--
Hurt not the Earth neither the Sea. Nor the Trees.                         Revelation 7:3  
"A people that values its privileges above its principles soon loses both."   
                                                                            President Dwight D. Eisenhower 
"The only thing to buy on credit is your casket."                       James A Michener
Debt is "anything that you pay today for yesterday's living"              Ruth Hayden
A model of Christian Charity: "We are all responsible (institutions and individuals)    to each other and to serve the common good"              Gov. John Winthrop 1630


Re: What happened to Crosley

Terrance Robinson
 

Pontiac,Oldsmobile,Hornet,Gremlin,Ambassador, Pacer---terry

On Wed, Feb 22, 2017 at 1:42 PM, crosleyshortsport <crosleyshortsport@...> wrote:
Anyone remember the eshelman?



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Terrance Robinson <tarobinson44@...>
Date: 2/22/17 5:18 PM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] What happened to Crosley

Hudson, Nash, Rambler, Plymouth, Desoto, Imperial, Mercury, Continental, Edsel. Packard, King Midget, Willys, Kaiser Darrin,Jeep

Terry

On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 9:46 AM, Roy McLaurin via Groups.Io <oroyme@...> wrote:

I am 63 and remember other car brands as a boy. Like  Fraiser, Tucker, Henry J,  Kaiser, Studebaker.  Can you name anymore? 




--
Hurt not the Earth neither the Sea. Nor the Trees.                         Revelation 7:3  
"A people that values its privileges above its principles soon loses both."   
                                                                            President Dwight D. Eisenhower 
"The only thing to buy on credit is your casket."                       James A Michener
Debt is "anything that you pay today for yesterday's living"              Ruth Hayden
A model of Christian Charity: "We are all responsible (institutions and individuals)    to each other and to serve the common good"              Gov. John Winthrop 1630




--
Hurt not the Earth neither the Sea. Nor the Trees.                         Revelation 7:3  
"A people that values its privileges above its principles soon loses both."   
                                                                            President Dwight D. Eisenhower 
"The only thing to buy on credit is your casket."                       James A Michener
Debt is "anything that you pay today for yesterday's living"              Ruth Hayden
A model of Christian Charity: "We are all responsible (institutions and individuals)    to each other and to serve the common good"              Gov. John Winthrop 1630


Pre war engine swap

Doug Daniel
 

I have heard that some pre war Crosley owners have installed two cylinder air cooled Honda engines into their cars. Could anyone provide me with the details of adapting the engine to the transmission? Did you use the Crosley flywheel and if so how did you mate it to the engine crankshaft, and how did you mate the bell housing to the engine block?

Thanks

Doug


Re: What happened to Crosley

parkhunter@...
 

I actually drove a Keller prototype once - though it was being towed on the end of a rope. A cute little wagon, not much bigger than a Crosley. The torsion elastic suspension was fabulous, very soft and quiet. Too bad Keller died before they could launch. 


Park


Re: Passenger size

Kenneth Beach
 

I noted the  mention of the King Midget. I restored a 1954 Model 1 to factory specks. At 6 foot and 250# it was a tuff squeeze for me. I believe a Crosley would be a very spacious ride by comparison.
Kenn

--
Kenneth  R. Beach II


Re: What happened to Crosley

fwitham
 

Sure do got a radiator for one!
 
 
 

In a message dated 02/22/17 18:42:42 Eastern Standard Time, crosleyshortsport@... writes:
Anyone remember the eshelman?



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Terrance Robinson <tarobinson44@...>
Date: 2/22/17 5:18 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] What happened to Crosley

Hudson, Nash, Rambler, Plymouth, Desoto, Imperial, Mercury, Continental, Edsel. Packard, King Midget, Willys, Kaiser Darrin,Jeep

Terry

On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 9:46 AM, Roy McLaurin via Groups.Io <oroyme@...> wrote:

I am 63 and remember other car brands as a boy. Like  Fraiser, Tucker, Henry J,  Kaiser, Studebaker.  Can you name anymore? 




--
Hurt not the Earth neither the Sea. Nor the Trees.                         Revelation 7:3  
"A people that values its privileges above its principles soon loses both."   
                                                                            President Dwight D. Eisenhower 
"The only thing to buy on credit is your casket."                       James A Michener
Debt is "anything that you pay today for yesterday's living"              Ruth Hayden
A model of Christian Charity: "We are all responsible (institutions and individuals)    to each other and to serve the common good"              Gov. John Winthrop 1630
 


Re: Engine change out

Tim Hamblen
 

I start out by having the engine hanging "square" on the hoist. In other words it's hanging level, no tipping front to rear or side to side. Lower it down so it has an even amount of gap around the two halves of the bellhousing. Then guide it in , ie : input shaft of tranny going the the clutch. By the way, I have the trans in 1st gear. If there is resistance to going in I can rock the car a bit back and forth and the splines in the input shaft and clutch disc will find their place. It'll slide right in. Have a couple bolts handy to put in the bellhousing to keep it there once lined up. Last one I done, the motor was tipped up in front once bolted in. I was a good 1" from the motor mounts lining up.I had to go back and loosen all the trans mount bolts and even had to loosen the 4 bolts on the bell that attaches the torque tube to the back of the trans. I had put one of Dave Edwards handy dandy O Ring seals in there and once tight it too was holding the engine up. Once the motor mounts were tight I tightened all the bolts on trans mount and torque tube.I have to admit the last two I done were body off restos so that made it much easier.


Re: What happened to Crosley

crosleyshortsport
 

Anyone remember the eshelman?



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Terrance Robinson <tarobinson44@...>
Date: 2/22/17 5:18 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] What happened to Crosley

Hudson, Nash, Rambler, Plymouth, Desoto, Imperial, Mercury, Continental, Edsel. Packard, King Midget, Willys, Kaiser Darrin,Jeep

Terry

On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 9:46 AM, Roy McLaurin via Groups.Io <oroyme@...> wrote:

I am 63 and remember other car brands as a boy. Like  Fraiser, Tucker, Henry J,  Kaiser, Studebaker.  Can you name anymore? 




--
Hurt not the Earth neither the Sea. Nor the Trees.                         Revelation 7:3  
"A people that values its privileges above its principles soon loses both."   
                                                                            President Dwight D. Eisenhower 
"The only thing to buy on credit is your casket."                       James A Michener
Debt is "anything that you pay today for yesterday's living"              Ruth Hayden
A model of Christian Charity: "We are all responsible (institutions and individuals)    to each other and to serve the common good"              Gov. John Winthrop 1630


Re: Looking for crosley pickup

Robert Connearney
 

Pretty hard to gain much with altered wheel offset. "Reversing" wheels generally increases track. Could go to some front-wheel-drive wheels, which are comparatively more offset inwards; 12" MG 1100 wheels would fit (4" bolt circle), but I'd be shocked if they gained more than 3/4" per wheel. (I think early Honda Civic wheels are 4" bc as well.) To gain the required 2.5" per side, you'd need to offset stock wheels by a about the width of the rim; the inner wheel would project several inches beyond the outer edge of the rim. Agreed, if you're going to swap the engine, then it's a "hot rod", and you might as well add flairs. Aesthetically, I think they would difficult to integrate with the later pick-ups, but might actually look cool on a "roundside".



            Bob Connearney 



From: Doug Daniel via Groups.Io <sanfelipedoug@...>
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 4:56 PM
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Looking for crosley pickup

  You are correct;  narrowing a rear axle at a competent machine shop can get expensive.

  Two other options are:
1).  Change  the wheel offset for the rear wheels so that the tires move inboard with the wider axle.
2).  Install fender flairs and let the front and rear wheel tread width be different.  

Thanks

      Doug


On Feb 22, 2017, at 12:51 PM, Robert Connearney via Groups.Io <rconnearney@...> wrote:

Some engines I would investigate for potential swap material:

  • BMC "A" Series (Sprite/Midget) - 948 to 1275 cc, easy to find and cheap, maybe shorter than the Crosley, but undoubtedly heavier.
  • Datsun "A" Series - 1200 - 1500 cc, similar to BMC "A", very rugged, 5-bearing forged steel crank, maybe not too easy to find. I know a guy that made this swap, which he says was fairly easy; used the Datsun transmission also, with open drive and a narrowed Metropolitan (Sprite/Midget) rear end. Could get you some specific info, if you think about going this route.
  • Suzuki 3-Cylinder - 1000 cc, used in Chevy Geos, don't know much about them, but I believe are all aluminum (therefore light), SOHC, probably shorter than Crosley, except I think the distributor is driven off the back of the cam, therefore may need a recess in the firewall. (A new model of the Lotus/Caterham 7 uses a current version of this engine, 660 cc, DOHC, 80 HP; these are from Suzuki Kei-Cars, therefore probably hard to source in the USA.) What's in the new little Chevies, maybe the current Suzuki 3-cylinder? You might check the small Chevy 4 Ecotec, I know a fellow putting one in a Ford Anglia/Popular.
  • Early Cortina/Pinto 1600 cc engines are nice, but hard to find since they're all snapped up by the Formula Ford guys. Ford Zetecs are similar displacement, DOHC. Or the current Duratec, similar to the Zetec but all-aluminum.

It would be ill-advised to even think about using the Crosley transmission/rear end, so you can figure on a significant packet of money to narrow a rear end. I think the narrowest available is the Spridget, which has a track of 45", about 5" more that a Crosley (but same wheel bolt pattern). Don't commit to a modern engine without making sure you won't have an emissions compliance problem with your friendly state government. (An acquaintance has a beautifully home-made Lotus Seven which took many years to build. But the engine, which was certifiable when he bought it, can no longer be used in what the state considers to be a "new" car.)

Many modern engines are set up for front wheel drive, so you probably need to budget for fabricating or buying an appropriate adapter to some available conventional transmission.
 
 Bob Connearney 



From: Jeremy Rutherford <jruthe2@...>
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 1:26 PM
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Looking for crosley pickup

I was planning on repowering for power, reliability, ease of maintenance, and familiarity.  Some of this was based on my assumption that engine and trans parts would be hard to come by and I figured I could get a donor chevy 4 and trans cheap. I am learning a lot already.  I did not realize they had produced a later motor capable of those numbers.  Are they fairly easy to come by? I am in no hurry to jump into the project, I have a 50 chevy I want to finish before I would even start anyway.  I just wanted to reach out and collect as much info as I could.  I did not realize there was such a strong community out there for crosleys, so I thought it would take me a lot longer to get info, but you guys have been great. I am starting to think I might hold back a little and plan on attending the nationals to see some ideas in person.
thans again for all the info






Re: What happened to Crosley

Terrance Robinson
 

Hudson, Nash, Rambler, Plymouth, Desoto, Imperial, Mercury, Continental, Edsel. Packard, King Midget, Willys, Kaiser Darrin,Jeep

Terry

On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 9:46 AM, Roy McLaurin via Groups.Io <oroyme@...> wrote:

I am 63 and remember other car brands as a boy. Like  Fraiser, Tucker, Henry J,  Kaiser, Studebaker.  Can you name anymore? 




--
Hurt not the Earth neither the Sea. Nor the Trees.                         Revelation 7:3  
"A people that values its privileges above its principles soon loses both."   
                                                                            President Dwight D. Eisenhower 
"The only thing to buy on credit is your casket."                       James A Michener
Debt is "anything that you pay today for yesterday's living"              Ruth Hayden
A model of Christian Charity: "We are all responsible (institutions and individuals)    to each other and to serve the common good"              Gov. John Winthrop 1630


Re: Looking for crosley pickup

Doug Daniel
 

  You are correct;  narrowing a rear axle at a competent machine shop can get expensive.

  Two other options are:
1).  Change  the wheel offset for the rear wheels so that the tires move inboard with the wider axle.
2).  Install fender flairs and let the front and rear wheel tread width be different.  

Thanks

      Doug


On Feb 22, 2017, at 12:51 PM, Robert Connearney via Groups.Io <rconnearney@...> wrote:

Some engines I would investigate for potential swap material:

  • BMC "A" Series (Sprite/Midget) - 948 to 1275 cc, easy to find and cheap, maybe shorter than the Crosley, but undoubtedly heavier.
  • Datsun "A" Series - 1200 - 1500 cc, similar to BMC "A", very rugged, 5-bearing forged steel crank, maybe not too easy to find. I know a guy that made this swap, which he says was fairly easy; used the Datsun transmission also, with open drive and a narrowed Metropolitan (Sprite/Midget) rear end. Could get you some specific info, if you think about going this route.
  • Suzuki 3-Cylinder - 1000 cc, used in Chevy Geos, don't know much about them, but I believe are all aluminum (therefore light), SOHC, probably shorter than Crosley, except I think the distributor is driven off the back of the cam, therefore may need a recess in the firewall. (A new model of the Lotus/Caterham 7 uses a current version of this engine, 660 cc, DOHC, 80 HP; these are from Suzuki Kei-Cars, therefore probably hard to source in the USA.) What's in the new little Chevies, maybe the current Suzuki 3-cylinder? You might check the small Chevy 4 Ecotec, I know a fellow putting one in a Ford Anglia/Popular.
  • Early Cortina/Pinto 1600 cc engines are nice, but hard to find since they're all snapped up by the Formula Ford guys. Ford Zetecs are similar displacement, DOHC. Or the current Duratec, similar to the Zetec but all-aluminum.

It would be ill-advised to even think about using the Crosley transmission/rear end, so you can figure on a significant packet of money to narrow a rear end. I think the narrowest available is the Spridget, which has a track of 45", about 5" more that a Crosley (but same wheel bolt pattern). Don't commit to a modern engine without making sure you won't have an emissions compliance problem with your friendly state government. (An acquaintance has a beautifully home-made Lotus Seven which took many years to build. But the engine, which was certifiable when he bought it, can no longer be used in what the state considers to be a "new" car.)

Many modern engines are set up for front wheel drive, so you probably need to budget for fabricating or buying an appropriate adapter to some available conventional transmission.
 
 Bob Connearney 



From: Jeremy Rutherford <jruthe2@...>
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 1:26 PM
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Looking for crosley pickup

I was planning on repowering for power, reliability, ease of maintenance, and familiarity.  Some of this was based on my assumption that engine and trans parts would be hard to come by and I figured I could get a donor chevy 4 and trans cheap. I am learning a lot already.  I did not realize they had produced a later motor capable of those numbers.  Are they fairly easy to come by? I am in no hurry to jump into the project, I have a 50 chevy I want to finish before I would even start anyway.  I just wanted to reach out and collect as much info as I could.  I did not realize there was such a strong community out there for crosleys, so I thought it would take me a lot longer to get info, but you guys have been great. I am starting to think I might hold back a little and plan on attending the nationals to see some ideas in person.
thans again for all the info




Re: Looking for crosley pickup

Robert Connearney
 

Some engines I would investigate for potential swap material:

  • BMC "A" Series (Sprite/Midget) - 948 to 1275 cc, easy to find and cheap, maybe shorter than the Crosley, but undoubtedly heavier.
  • Datsun "A" Series - 1200 - 1500 cc, similar to BMC "A", very rugged, 5-bearing forged steel crank, maybe not too easy to find. I know a guy that made this swap, which he says was fairly easy; used the Datsun transmission also, with open drive and a narrowed Metropolitan (Sprite/Midget) rear end. Could get you some specific info, if you think about going this route.
  • Suzuki 3-Cylinder - 1000 cc, used in Chevy Geos, don't know much about them, but I believe are all aluminum (therefore light), SOHC, probably shorter than Crosley, except I think the distributor is driven off the back of the cam, therefore may need a recess in the firewall. (A new model of the Lotus/Caterham 7 uses a current version of this engine, 660 cc, DOHC, 80 HP; these are from Suzuki Kei-Cars, therefore probably hard to source in the USA.) What's in the new little Chevies, maybe the current Suzuki 3-cylinder? You might check the small Chevy 4 Ecotec, I know a fellow putting one in a Ford Anglia/Popular.
  • Early Cortina/Pinto 1600 cc engines are nice, but hard to find since they're all snapped up by the Formula Ford guys. Ford Zetecs are similar displacement, DOHC. Or the current Duratec, similar to the Zetec but all-aluminum.

It would be ill-advised to even think about using the Crosley transmission/rear end, so you can figure on a significant packet of money to narrow a rear end. I think the narrowest available is the Spridget, which has a track of 45", about 5" more that a Crosley (but same wheel bolt pattern). Don't commit to a modern engine without making sure you won't have an emissions compliance problem with your friendly state government. (An acquaintance has a beautifully home-made Lotus Seven which took many years to build. But the engine, which was certifiable when he bought it, can no longer be used in what the state considers to be a "new" car.)

Many modern engines are set up for front wheel drive, so you probably need to budget for fabricating or buying an appropriate adapter to some available conventional transmission.
 
 Bob Connearney 



From: Jeremy Rutherford <jruthe2@...>
To: Crosley-Gang@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 1:26 PM
Subject: Re: [Crosley-Gang] Looking for crosley pickup

I was planning on repowering for power, reliability, ease of maintenance, and familiarity.  Some of this was based on my assumption that engine and trans parts would be hard to come by and I figured I could get a donor chevy 4 and trans cheap. I am learning a lot already.  I did not realize they had produced a later motor capable of those numbers.  Are they fairly easy to come by? I am in no hurry to jump into the project, I have a 50 chevy I want to finish before I would even start anyway.  I just wanted to reach out and collect as much info as I could.  I did not realize there was such a strong community out there for crosleys, so I thought it would take me a lot longer to get info, but you guys have been great. I am starting to think I might hold back a little and plan on attending the nationals to see some ideas in person.
thans again for all the info




Re: Looking for crosley pickup

paul
 

Jeremy,
I took my answers off the list to save space before, but I knew these great folks would be receptive to giving good advice. nobody is going to BS you or lead you wrong. you are on the right track, save the weekend in July to come to northwestern Ohio, see, talk, and get ideas. there's your chance to sit in a Crosley or two, height and weight isn't a problem, a stock Crosley will wrap around you like Cinderella's glass slipper. the good Lord knew I'd have an appetite and thus a larger rear side, so instead of making me 6 ft tall, he bent a couple of extra inches around to my foot length for balance, size 12s. a stock Crosley isn't a problem, but bringing the pedals closer and moving them to the left by pushing in the firewall and widening the trans tunnel might make for cramped space. Paul Rinehart in Dayton, Ohio

On 2/22/2017 1:26 PM, Jeremy Rutherford wrote:

I was planning on repowering for power, reliability, ease of maintenance, and familiarity. Some of this was based on my assumption that engine and trans parts would be hard to come by and I figured I could get a donor chevy 4 and trans cheap. I am learning a lot already. I did not realize they had produced a later motor capable of those numbers. Are they fairly easy to come by? I am in no hurry to jump into the project, I have a 50 chevy I want to finish before I would even start anyway. I just wanted to reach out and collect as much info as I could. I did not realize there was such a strong community out there for crosleys, so I thought it would take me a lot longer to get info, but you guys have been great. I am starting to think I might hold back a little and plan on attending the nationals to see some ideas in person.

thans again for all the info


Re: Looking for crosley pickup

Jim Bollman
 

The last generation of Crosley based engines were built by Homelite and Bearcat as vertical boat engines. They are not as available as Crosley engines but they are not to hard to come by. They do take some work and a donor Crosley engine to convert back into a car engine but the results are pretty amazing. Driving a Crosley, that still sounds like a Crosley, that has 2 to 3 times the hp is pretty impressive (by Crosley standards). There are other variations with varying HP.  As you are finding out Crosley mechanical parts are fairly easy to get when you look for them, not as easy as Chey or Ford but not bad. Our vendors are great keeping parts affordable. For long distance driving you do need to carry a few spares because not every parts stores will have parts.

The Crosley Engine Family Tree is a good place to learn of the variations, the post Crosley updates are on page 4 and 5.

On Feb 22, 2017, at 1:26 PM, Jeremy Rutherford <jruthe2@...> wrote:

I was planning on repowering for power, reliability, ease of maintenance, and familiarity.  Some of this was based on my assumption that engine and trans parts would be hard to come by and I figured I could get a donor chevy 4 and trans cheap. I am learning a lot already.  I did not realize they had produced a later motor capable of those numbers.  Are they fairly easy to come by? I am in no hurry to jump into the project, I have a 50 chevy I want to finish before I would even start anyway.  I just wanted to reach out and collect as much info as I could.  I did not realize there was such a strong community out there for crosleys, so I thought it would take me a lot longer to get info, but you guys have been great. I am starting to think I might hold back a little and plan on attending the nationals to see some ideas in person.

thans again for all the info




Re: Looking for crosley pickup

Jeremy Rutherford
 

I was planning on repowering for power, reliability, ease of maintenance, and familiarity.  Some of this was based on my assumption that engine and trans parts would be hard to come by and I figured I could get a donor chevy 4 and trans cheap. I am learning a lot already.  I did not realize they had produced a later motor capable of those numbers.  Are they fairly easy to come by? I am in no hurry to jump into the project, I have a 50 chevy I want to finish before I would even start anyway.  I just wanted to reach out and collect as much info as I could.  I did not realize there was such a strong community out there for crosleys, so I thought it would take me a lot longer to get info, but you guys have been great. I am starting to think I might hold back a little and plan on attending the nationals to see some ideas in person.

thans again for all the info



Re: Engine change out

L.E. Hardee
 

Personally, I would install the passenger side motor mount, generator and water pump before I installed the engine while it is more accessible.  With a Crosley, the excess weight shouldn't be an issue. Install the drivers side motor mount when the engine is positioned in the car.  You definitely will want to use a transmission input shaft to align the clutch while you tighten up the pressure plate bolts before you begin installation.    Crosley is an easy car to install an engine (except for the VC's).

On Wed, Feb 22, 2017 at 9:12 AM, Andy Drake <drakeap@...> wrote:

Inquiring minds want to know: what's the easiest way to do this? I've read the manual about a hundred times and it's relatively straightforward...in print. When I attempted to drop a motor into my '47 sedan two summers ago, I ran into all kinds of logistical challenges, not the least of which was dealing with the transmission and the legs to my engine hoist not fitting underneath the car easily which made dropping it into place a chore.

Step 1 appears to be to strip the motor of generator/water pump/manifolds to reduce unsprung weight, including removal of the transmission. 

Step 2 is install the transmission in the car first (minus shift lever) so you can later lower the motor in place and "just" slide it back to mate up with the bellhousing.

Step 3 is to make sure engine compartment is clear (radiator is removed, etc.) so there's enough room to move the engine front to back.

Step 4 lower motor in place and slide back so transmission input shaft slots into flywheel/clutch. Here's where I think I went wrong -- what's the trick to align everything? Use the transmission input shaft to set the clutch disk and flywheel in place, then gently remove and install transmission? You still have to sort of jiggle the flywheel to get everything to slide into place, right?

Step 5 Bolt everything back together, install generator/water pump/manifolds.

It's just that simple, right? What am I missing?




Re: Engine change out

paul
 

Andy,
I have had good luck with nylon rope around the engine (not a chain) and over the hook of the hoist, more maneuverability. also with the hood off, one can put the front half of the car on stands and come in from the side, straddle the tire. a second person is a huge help too, the lower man can move the light engine all around while the upper fellow moves the hoist, adjusts the height, and tilts the engine, easy enough when the rope slides in the hook. Paul Rinehart in Dayton, Ohio

On 2/22/2017 9:12 AM, Andy Drake wrote:

Inquiring minds want to know: what's the easiest way to do this? I've read the manual about a hundred times and it's relatively straightforward...in print. When I attempted to drop a motor into my '47 sedan two summers ago, I ran into all kinds of logistical challenges, not the least of which was dealing with the transmission and the legs to my engine hoist not fitting underneath the car easily which made dropping it into place a chore.

Step 1 appears to be to strip the motor of generator/water pump/manifolds to reduce unsprung weight, including removal of the transmission.

Step 2 is install the transmission in the car first (minus shift lever) so you can later lower the motor in place and "just" slide it back to mate up with the bellhousing.

Step 3 is to make sure engine compartment is clear (radiator is removed, etc.) so there's enough room to move the engine front to back.

Step 4 lower motor in place and slide back so transmission input shaft slots into flywheel/clutch. Here's where I think I went wrong --
what's the trick to align everything? Use the transmission input shaft to set the clutch disk and flywheel in place, then gently remove and install transmission? You still have to sort of jiggle the flywheel to get everything to slide into place, right?

Step 5 Bolt everything back together, install generator/water pump/manifolds.

It's just that simple, right? What am I missing?


Re: What happened to Crosley

Doug Daniel
 

Checker from Kalamazoo, Mi. (They made private ownership sedans and station wagons as well as taxis).

Edsel

Thanks

      Doug


On Feb 22, 2017, at 6:00 AM, John Van Sickle via Groups.Io <crosleyjon@...> wrote:

Let's not forget the KING MIDGET...I toured the factory when I was 7.
 
John

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