Recommendation


MPate@...
 

I have been a ham since 1982 but am just getting my feet wet with HF.  So I am just starting my research into towers.  I've been monitoring this group for months and see that there is a lot of knowledge about towers. 

With that in mind, I would greatly appreciate anyone's recommendation on a 30'-40' crank up tower which will support a Mosley TA53 antenna.

73's,
Mike, K5MAP


Larry Stowell K1ZW
 

Mike

Aluma Towers

https://www.alumatower.com

I've had their 75ft for 17 years no problems.

73 Larry K1ZW


On 4/23/2018 10:55 AM, MPate@... wrote:
I have been a ham since 1982 but am just getting my feet wet with HF.  So I am just starting my research into towers.  I've been monitoring this group for months and see that there is a lot of knowledge about towers. 

With that in mind, I would greatly appreciate anyone's recommendation on a 30'-40' crank up tower which will support a Mosley TA53 antenna.

73's,
Mike, K5MAP

-- 


 

I agree with Larry, K1ZW, the Alumatower is the way to go. I have had the T40HN for a couple years and it is a great tower. I mounted it with the MP-2 ground pole without cement. I dug a 6'6" deep hole about 24" wide with a shovel and sop-vac and dropped the MP-2 into the hole. Then filled the hole with dirt and a little water to pack it down. It is as solid as anything I could get with cement. Tower survived near direct strike by Hurrican Irma last year. I lowered it and then tilted it over. I placed a couple ground screws into the ground and used a couple ratchet straps to secure the tower to the ground. It went right back up into service as soon as the wind was over.

Aluma Tower was great to work with and has provided me with a great tower. My wife and I picked it up at the factory in a Uhaul. We then were able to take it out of the truck by ourselves, it is that light. The perfect tower, easy to install and maintain. 


Andre VanWyk
 

I am curios here. What is the approximate cost of a 75ft Aluma that can handle about 20sq.ft of antenna?
 
73
NJ0F
 
 

From: Rich KR4PI
Sent: Monday, April 23, 2018 10:35 AM
Subject: Re: [CrankupTiltoverTowers] Recommendation
 
I agree with Larry, K1ZW, the Alumatower is the way to go. I have had the T40HN for a couple years and it is a great tower. I mounted it with the MP-2 ground pole without cement. I dug a 6'6" deep hole about 24" wide with a shovel and sop-vac and dropped the MP-2 into the hole. Then filled the hole with dirt and a little water to pack it down. It is as solid as anything I could get with cement. Tower survived near direct strike by Hurrican Irma last year. I lowered it and then tilted it over. I placed a couple ground screws into the ground and used a couple ratchet straps to secure the tower to the ground. It went right back up into service as soon as the wind was over.

Aluma Tower was great to work with and has provided me with a great tower. My wife and I picked it up at the factory in a Uhaul. We then were able to take it out of the truck by ourselves, it is that light. The perfect tower, easy to install and maintain. 


Larry Stowell K1ZW
 

Andre

I don't know what today's price is but in 2001 mine cost $7665(rotor plate, thrust bearing, ground mount post and motorized winch)

I have had a C31XR and then a 4el SteppIR with loop on it. I think he was asking some about a Mosley ??53.

73 Larry K1ZW


On 4/23/2018 11:54 AM, Andre VanWyk via Groups.Io wrote:
I am curios here. What is the approximate cost of a 75ft Aluma that can handle about 20sq.ft of antenna?
 
73
NJ0F
 
 
From: Rich KR4PI
Sent: Monday, April 23, 2018 10:35 AM
Subject: Re: [CrankupTiltoverTowers] Recommendation
 
I agree with Larry, K1ZW, the Alumatower is the way to go. I have had the T40HN for a couple years and it is a great tower. I mounted it with the MP-2 ground pole without cement. I dug a 6'6" deep hole about 24" wide with a shovel and sop-vac and dropped the MP-2 into the hole. Then filled the hole with dirt and a little water to pack it down. It is as solid as anything I could get with cement. Tower survived near direct strike by Hurrican Irma last year. I lowered it and then tilted it over. I placed a couple ground screws into the ground and used a couple ratchet straps to secure the tower to the ground. It went right back up into service as soon as the wind was over.

Aluma Tower was great to work with and has provided me with a great tower. My wife and I picked it up at the factory in a Uhaul. We then were able to take it out of the truck by ourselves, it is that light. The perfect tower, easy to install and maintain. 

-- 
73 Larry K1ZW


Andre VanWyk
 

Thanks for the response Larry. I am looking at a lightweight solution for a client who has no vehicle access to the back of his house where we plan on installing a crank up tower and his XYL told us that we will for sure find out if there is life after death if we damage her lawn, so I am going to look into an Aluma crankup since they are light enough to carry over the lawn.

73's

Andre

NJ0F

 

From: CrankupTiltoverTowers@groups.io [mailto:CrankupTiltoverTowers@groups.io] On Behalf Of Larry Stowell K1ZW
Sent: Monday, April 23, 2018 12:23 PM
To: CrankupTiltoverTowers@groups.io
Subject: Re: [CrankupTiltoverTowers] Recommendation

 

Andre

I don't know what today's price is but in 2001 mine cost $7665(rotor plate, thrust bearing, ground mount post and motorized winch)

I have had a C31XR and then a 4el SteppIR with loop on it. I think he was asking some about a Mosley ??53.

73 Larry K1ZW

 

On 4/23/2018 11:54 AM, Andre VanWyk via Groups.Io wrote:

I am curios here. What is the approximate cost of a 75ft Aluma that can handle about 20sq.ft of antenna?

 

73

NJ0F

 

 

From: Rich KR4PI

Sent: Monday, April 23, 2018 10:35 AM

Subject: Re: [CrankupTiltoverTowers] Recommendation

 

I agree with Larry, K1ZW, the Alumatower is the way to go. I have had the T40HN for a couple years and it is a great tower. I mounted it with the MP-2 ground pole without cement. I dug a 6'6" deep hole about 24" wide with a shovel and sop-vac and dropped the MP-2 into the hole. Then filled the hole with dirt and a little water to pack it down. It is as solid as anything I could get with cement. Tower survived near direct strike by Hurrican Irma last year. I lowered it and then tilted it over. I placed a couple ground screws into the ground and used a couple ratchet straps to secure the tower to the ground. It went right back up into service as soon as the wind was over.

Aluma Tower was great to work with and has provided me with a great tower. My wife and I picked it up at the factory in a Uhaul. We then were able to take it out of the truck by ourselves, it is that light. The perfect tower, easy to install and maintain. 



-- 
73 Larry K1ZW