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ChordPro and slash chords #windows #needinfo


KevinHopkinsSmith@...
 

I have an old Win32 Linux (Peppermint 10 distro) machine (Asus Eee PC) that I sometimes use to write and edit ChordPro files. I wanted to use ChordPro software to preview my files on that machine. I followed the installation instructions on the ChordPro site and experienced an UNUSUALLY long installation routine (took almost an hour) after installing the required PERL stuff. Parenthetically, after all that effort, would a clickable icon have been too much to hope for? :)
 
 When I was all done, I discovered that the installed version of ChordPro did not recognize "slash" chords (e.g. [A/C#] and threw error messages for files that contained them (although they did display properly in the Preview window). Is there some kind of fix for this or do I just ignore the errors and hope that MobileSheets will handle them ok when, for
example, transposing? Does anyone know if it does?
 
As a hack pianist, I do recognize that slash chords COULD be described more traditionally, but the slash style helps me realize how I should be  walking the bass line--I don't read the bass clef (a hazard of having been schooled solely on the accordion :) ). Thanks for any help.


Johan Vromans
 

Hi Kevin,

About the installation: there are several installation instructions on the ChordPro site. Which did you use? And what version of ChordPro did you install?

About slash chords: ChordPro understands slash chords but doesn't have built-in diagrams for these chords. You can add them yourself, in the song:

{define: A/C# frets x 4 2 2 2 4}

or in a config file (see https://www.chordpro.org/chordpro/ChordPro-Configuration-Generic.html#user-defined-chords).

Note that the chord definition is only required if you want to print chord diagrams. If you turn off guitar diagrams (you're a piano player) all slash chords should be fine.


KevinHopkinsSmith@...
 

Thanks!  Maybe I got the errors because I hadn't turned off chord diagrams (-G), but I think they persisted--specifically referencing all my slash chords. I'll take a look at the configuration file you referenced.

As to the Linux installation, I installed wxperl and its dependencies from my Synaptic package manager, then ran the sudo cpan install chordpro command from Terminal. It's the latter that took forever. I'm just wondering if all that installation activity made my lightweight Peppermint 10 system into something entirely different just to be able to display ChordPro files in Linux. I have no clue how to uninstall all of that and would only dare attempt it if I had more than an hour to spare. Chordii, by the way, was in my distro and installed quickly, but threw even more errors on my files so I uninstalled it first and found ChordPro, which I now realize is its updated successor. 

Thanks again. 

On Apr 4, 2020, at 9:16 AM, Johan Vromans <jvromans+gio@...> wrote:

Hi Kevin,

About the installation: there are several installation instructions on the ChordPro site. Which did you use? And what version of ChordPro did you install?

About slash chords: ChordPro understands slash chords but doesn't have built-in diagrams for these chords. You can add them yourself, in the song:

{define: A/C# frets x 4 2 2 2 4}

or in a config file (see https://www.chordpro.org/chordpro/ChordPro-Configuration-Generic.html#user-defined-chords).

Note that the chord definition is only required if you want to print chord diagrams. If you turn off guitar diagrams (you're a piano player) all slash chords should be fine.


Johan Vromans
 

To install ChordPro you do not need wxperl. This is only required for the GUI (wxChordPro). Are you using it? ChordPro itself has just a few dependencies. I have no idea why it took so long. I assume you didn't keep the install logfiles?

Anyway, you can proceed now. How you like it and do not hesitate to ask.


Kevin Smith <KevinHopkinsSmith@...>
 

Sorry, I should have mentioned that I wanted to use the GUI. But, again, the wxPerl part installed way more quickly than the sudo cpan install chordpro. I don't understand Linux well enough to know what it was doing--lots of "making" and testing and other verbs I didn't know. I thought it was developing vaccine. 


On Apr 4, 2020, at 11:10 AM, Johan Vromans <jvromans+gio@...> wrote:

To install ChordPro you do not need wxperl. This is only required for the GUI (wxChordPro). Are you using it? ChordPro itself has just a few dependencies. I have no idea why it took so long. I assume you didn't keep the install logfiles?

Anyway, you can proceed now. How you like it and do not hesitate to ask.


Johan Vromans
 

Then I assume it didn't find the wxperl stuff (can't tell you why) and it downloaded and installed a complete wxWidgets environment. Yes, that takes a long time...

ChordPro is currently available in the Fedora repositories as a prebuilt package. I've asked in this group for people who want to package ChordPro for Debian, Ubuntu and so on, but noone replied yet. :(


Kevin Smith <KevinHopkinsSmith@...>
 

So you think I have 2 separate wxperl environments installed now?

On Apr 4, 2020, at 12:01 PM, Johan Vromans <jvromans+gio@...> wrote:

Then I assume it didn't find the wxperl stuff (can't tell you why) and it downloaded and installed a complete wxWidgets environment. Yes, that takes a long time...

ChordPro is currently available in the Fedora repositories as a prebuilt package. I've asked in this group for people who want to package ChordPro for Debian, Ubuntu and so on, but noone replied yet. :(


Johan Vromans
 

It's a guess. I need to see the logfiles to be sure. But as long as it works...


Kevin Smith <KevinHopkinsSmith@...>
 

Where would I find those logs?

On Apr 4, 2020, at 1:07 PM, Johan Vromans <jvromans+gio@...> wrote:

It's a guess. I need to see the logfiles to be sure. But as long as it works...


Johan Vromans
 

They were written to the terminal during the build. Unless you captured them they are gone.


Johan Vromans
 

On second thought, the chordpro kit does not have a dependency on wxperl so it won't pull in the Wx environment.


Kevin Smith <KevinHopkinsSmith@...>
 

Well, it pulled in something that took an hour to install! AND the instructions were to install wxperl from one's Package Manager, which I did but which took very little time. As long as all that "sudo cpan install chordpro" installing is not adding overhead to my everyday use of the Peppermint OS, I have no worries. But I converted that machine to Peppermint to extend its useful life, not to make it as bloated as Windows!

If I indeed now have a complete wxWidgets environment, how would I know? What cool uses could I make of it?

On Apr 5, 2020, at 4:26 AM, Johan Vromans <jvromans+gio@...> wrote:

On second thought, the chordpro kit does not have a dependency on wxperl so it won't pull in the Wx environment.


Johan Vromans
 

It is correct that installing wxperl via the package manager is quick. I have no idea why install chordpro took such a long time. You could take a look at the .cpan/build directory of user root to see what folders are most recent; this will give a clue.

I don't think that anything installed will get in the way of daily operations.

If you can run wxchordpro then you have a wxWidgets environment.


Tony Mann
 

On a related note, I have so far been unable to get wxchordpro to run on my Mac, since the perl Alien::wxWidgets module fails to compile. When I finally get it working I will post my solution.

I have a suggestion: let’s *not* install wxchordpro via the chordpro module. Way too many dependencies. Instead, we can use the separate wxchordpro module for that.

On Apr 5, 2020, at 10:33 AM, Johan Vromans <jvromans+gio@...> wrote:

It is correct that installing wxperl via the package manager is quick. I have no idea why install chordpro took such a long time. You could take a look at the .cpan/build directory of user root to see what folders are most recent; this will give a clue.

I don't think that anything installed will get in the way of daily operations.

If you can run wxchordpro then you have a wxWidgets environment.