Upcoming Events #cal-summary

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California Disasters Upcoming Events

2001 Star Fire Anniversary

When:
Sunday, 25 August 2019

Where:
Sierra Nevada - El Dorado County

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The Star Fire burned 16,761 acres in August and September, 2001, on the Tahoe and El Dorado National Forests as well as parts of the French Meadow Reservoir. The fire cost upwards of of $26 million to fight.

Source: https://www.tahoedailytribune.com/news/officials-optimistic-about-star-fire/ and
https://www.govinfo.gov/app/details/FR-2001-12-28/01-31906

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2009 Station Fire Anniversary

When:
Monday, 26 August 2019

Where:
San Gabriel Mountains - Los Angeles County

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The Station Fire was the largest wildfire of the 2009 California wildfire season, as well as the largest wildfire in the history of Los Angeles County, that burned in the Angeles National Forest, igniting on August 26, 2009 near the U.S. Forest Service ranger station on the Angeles Crest Highway. Two firefighters, Captain Tedmund Hall and Firefighter Specialist Arnie Quinones, died on August 30, when their fire truck plunged off a cliff during an attempt to set backfires to slow the blaze. The blaze threatened 12,000 structures in the National Forest and the nearby communities of La Cañada Flintridge, Pasadena, Glendale, Acton, La Crescenta, Juniper Hills, Littlerock and Altadena, as well as the Sunland and Tujunga neighborhoods of the City of Los Angeles. Many of these areas faced mandatory evacuations as the flames drew near, but as of September 6, all evacuation orders were lifted. The Station Fire burned on the slopes of Mount Wilson, destroying numerous television, radio and cellular telephone antennas on the summit, and threatened the Mount Wilson Observatory, which includes several historically significant telescopes and multimillion-dollar astronomical facilities operated by UCLA, USC, UC Berkeley and Georgia State University.[9][10] A 40-mile (64-kilometer) stretch of the Angeles Crest Highway was closed until 2010, due to guardrail and sign damage, although the pavement remained largely intact.

On September 3, officials announced that the Station Fire was caused by arson and that a homicide investigation had been initiated because of the deaths of the firefighters involved. Investigators discovered a substance at the fire's point of origin which they believe may have accelerated the flames. The two firefighters, supervisors of inmate fire crews (jointly operated by the Los Angeles County Fire Department and California Department of Corrections), had been conducting ignition operations in order to protect personnel and Mt Gleason Camp 16 from the advancing fire front. As of September 15, $93.8 million (2009 USD) had been spent fighting the fire, which was 91% contained, with full containment expected by September 19.The Station Fire was 100% contained at 7:00 pm PST on Friday, October 16, 2009, due to moderate rainfall from a powerful storm system passing through. At 160,557 acres (649.75 km2), the Station Fire is the 10th largest in modern California history, and the largest wildfire in the modern history of Los Angeles County, surpassing the 105,000-acre (164 sq mi; 425 km2) Clampitt Fire of September 1970.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Station_Fire_(2009)

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1999 Willow Fire Anniversary

When:
Wednesday, 28 August 2019

Where:
San Bernardino Mountains - San Bernardino County

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
On September 28, 1999, the Willow Fire began and burned throughout the rest of August and into early September of 1999. The Willow Fire is one of the worst in forest history, burned 63,486 acres of the San Bernardino National Forest (SBNF), Bureau of Land Management, and private lands north of Lake Arrowhead and Big Bear Lake, in San Bernardino County. This fire also destroyed 40 structures including at least 12 homes. The fire was fought by 2,750 firefighters.


Source: http://www.sricrm.com/projects/willow.html
http://alpenhornnews.com/mountain-wildfires-over-the-years-p6028-155.htm

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2017 Helena Fire Anniversary

When:
Friday, 30 August 2019

Where:
Trinity Alps Wilderness - Trinity County

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The Helena Fire was a wildfire that burned in Trinity Alps Wilderness and west of the town of Weaverville, Trinity County, California in the United States. The fire had burned 21,846 acres (88 km2), and destroyed 72 homes. The fire merged with the nearby Fork Fire (3,484 acres (14 km2)). The Helena Fire was fully extinguished on November 15, after reaching 21,846 acres (88 km2). The cause of the fire was a tree falling into a power line. The fire threatened the communities of Weaverville and Junction City and impacting recreational activities in the area.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helena_Fire

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1986 Aeroméxico 498 Crash Anniversary

When:
Saturday, 31 August 2019

Where:
Cerritos - Los Angeles County

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The 1986 Cerritos midair collision was a plane crash that occurred in southern California over the Los Angeles suburb of Cerritos on Sunday, August 31, 1986. Aeroméxico Flight 498, a McDonnell Douglas DC-9, was clipped in the tail section by N4891F, a Piper PA-28-181 Archer owned by the Kramer family, while descending into Los Angeles International Airport, killing all 67 on both aircraft and an additional fifteen on the ground. Eight on the ground also sustained minor injuries from the midday crash.

Blame was allocated equally between the Federal Aviation Administration and the pilot of the Piper. No fault was found with the DC-9 or the actions of its crew.

On Sunday, August 31, 1986 at about 11:46 am PDT, Flight 498 began its descent into Los Angeles with 58 passengers and six crew members on board. At 11:52 am, the Piper's engine collided with the left horizontal stabilizer of the DC-9, shearing off the top of the Piper's cockpit and decapitating Kramer and both of his passengers. The heavily damaged Piper fell onto an empty playground at Cerritos Elementary School.

The DC-9, with all of its horizontal stabilizer and most of its vertical stabilizer torn off, inverted and immediately entered a dive. It slammed into a residential neighborhood at Holmes Avenue and Reva Circle in Cerritos, crashing into the backyard of a house at 13426 Ashworth Place, exploding on impact. The explosion scattered the DC-9's wreckage across Holmes Avenue and onto Carmenita Road, destroying four other houses and damaging seven more. All 64 passengers and crew on board the DC-9 were killed, and fifteen people on the ground; a fire added to the damage.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1986_Cerritos_mid-air_collision

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2002 Curve Fire Anniversary

When:
Sunday, 1 September 2019

Where:
San Gabriel Mountains - Los Angeles County

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The Curve Fire consumed 20,857 acres of on the Angeles National Forest above Azusa, including incinerating most of the Crystal Lake Basin, much of the Sheep Mountain Wilderness, and the historic South Hawkins Fire Lookout. 72 structures, many of them cabins, were destroyed. It was started by candles being lit as part of a pagan ritual. Later, the Wiliams Fire would burn into the remnants of the Curve Fire and become known as the Curve-Williams Complex, burning more than 58,951 combined acres.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2002_California_wildfires and
https://danshikingblog.blogspot.com/2012/09/curve-fire-remembered-ten-years-later.html

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2002 Leona Fire Anniversary

When:
Tuesday, 3 September 2019

Where:
Canyon Country - Los Angeles County

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
West winds drove the Leona Fire out of Leona Valley and towards Palmdale destroying 4 homes and 12 outbuildings to go with 5,124 acres charred before being contained. The fire was started by a stringer.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2002_California_wildfires and others

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2006 Day Fire Anniversary

When:
Wednesday, 4 September 2019

Where:
Topatopa Mountains - Ventura County

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The Day Fire was a devastating wildfire that burned 162,702 acres (658 km2) of land in the Topatopa Mountains, within the Los Padres National Forest in Ventura County, southern California. As of 2017, the Day Fire is the 12th largest wildfire in modern California history.

The fire, which was the largest of the 2006 California wildfire season, is the 12th largest fire in California history. The fire started on Labor Day September 4, 2006, and by October 1, had cost $70.3 million; at one point, the Day Fire had 4,600 active firefighters combating it.

The Day Fire burned approximately 162,702 acres (658.43 km2) of both Los Padres National Forest (97.4%) and privately owned lands. The fire started on the Ojai Ranger District, in the Congressionally Designated Sespe Wilderness. The Sespe Wilderness is under the Federal jurisdiction of the United States Forest Service. In addition to the land burned in the wilderness area, 1,943 acres (8 km2) of private land was burned in Lockwood Valley and the Mutau Flat area. A total of eleven structures were reported destroyed, including one residence and ten outbuildings.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day_Fire

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2001 Darby Fire Anniversary

When:
Thursday, 5 September 2019

Where:
Sierra Nevada - Calaveras County

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The Darby Fire roared up out of the Stanislaus River Canyon and threatened communities along Hwy. 4 and Calaveras Big Tree State Park. The consumed 14,280 acres of forest and brush and destroyed a camper and a fire engine as well as the flume water system for Angels Camp, CA. The fire cost $20.8 million to fight over the course of 1-1/2 weeks.

Source: https://www.yosemitegold.com/yosemite/cable.htm and others

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1932 Matilija Fire Anniversary

When:
Saturday, 7 September 2019

Where:
Santa Ynez Mnts. & Topatopa Mnts. - Santa Barbara & Ventura Counties

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The Matilija Fire started on private land north of Ojai in Mitilija Canyon. Firefighters expected containment at 600 acres when shifting winds caused it to blow up. Within an hour after the flare-up the fire traveled 15 miles; by mid-afternoon it had charred 20,000 acres, much of it on what was then named the Santa Barbara National Forest (now the Los Padres National Forest). For the next 10 days the flames swept 10,000 to 20,000 acres daily. On September 10, powerful Santa Ana Winds drove the fire all the way to the ocean along a 5-mile wide front that was 12 miles long. The conflagration blackened 219,255 acres and killed 8 people. A total of 2,500 firefighters based in 17 fire camps (12 reached only by pack animal) cut 450 miles of fireline to contain the fire.

Source: https://www.kqed.org/science/1928992/half-of-californias-10-largest-fires-occurred-in-the-last-5-years
https://books.google.com/books?isbn=0295805218 

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