What's in the sky?


Kent Blackwell
 

November 20, 2020
Telescope fitted with a solar filter:: Look for a fairly large sunspot on the solar meridian. You'll probably need about 20x to see it. 
Telescope with a H-Alpha filter: A large prominence on the eastern limb, as well as several interesting filaments around the above mentioned sunspot.

In the night sky, Mars is slipping away so its angular size continues to shrink. Look fast, if you haven't already.
There's a fairly bright telescopic comet in Orion: C/2020 M3 ATLAS. It's beautiful in the 25" from a dark sky. Not sure you can see it at all with a small telescope in the city but it should show nicely with an 8" or larger telescope.
If you're running SkySafari ignore the fact they list it at 13.5 magnitude. I estimate it to be closer to 8-9th magnitude. But bear in mind it'll look fainter than that due to low surface brightness of comets. 
05h 28' RA
+13 32' DEC

Kent B


charles jagow
 

Tried last night @ Rott’n Paws with the 12” Dob and could not see the comet or even anything remotely fuzzy or ANYTHING in the area of the comet.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Kent Blackwell <kent@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Friday, November 20, 2020 at 9:55 AM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] What's in the sky?

 

November 20, 2020
Telescope fitted with a solar filter:: Look for a fairly large sunspot on the solar meridian. You'll probably need about 20x to see it. 
Telescope with a H-Alpha filter: A large prominence on the eastern limb, as well as several interesting filaments around the above mentioned sunspot.

In the night sky, Mars is slipping away so its angular size continues to shrink. Look fast, if you haven't already.
There's a fairly bright telescopic comet in Orion: C/2020 M3 ATLAS. It's beautiful in the 25" from a dark sky. Not sure you can see it at all with a small telescope in the city but it should show nicely with an 8" or larger telescope.
If you're running SkySafari ignore the fact they list it at 13.5 magnitude. I estimate it to be closer to 8-9th magnitude. But bear in mind it'll look fainter than that due to low surface brightness of comets. 
05h 28' RA
+13 32' DEC

Kent B


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


jimcoble2000
 

Yes I tried the other night from here and no go. Shows how important the sky quality is. The comet was easy in the 4 inch from Coinjock a couple of days ago. Amazing how widely spread brightness reports for comets are.

On Saturday, November 21, 2020, 7:01:27 AM EST, charles jagow <chuck@...> wrote:


Tried last night @ Rott’n Paws with the 12” Dob and could not see the comet or even anything remotely fuzzy or ANYTHING in the area of the comet.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Kent Blackwell <kent@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Friday, November 20, 2020 at 9:55 AM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] What's in the sky?

 

November 20, 2020
Telescope fitted with a solar filter:: Look for a fairly large sunspot on the solar meridian. You'll probably need about 20x to see it. 
Telescope with a H-Alpha filter: A large prominence on the eastern limb, as well as several interesting filaments around the above mentioned sunspot.

In the night sky, Mars is slipping away so its angular size continues to shrink. Look fast, if you haven't already.
There's a fairly bright telescopic comet in Orion: C/2020 M3 ATLAS. It's beautiful in the 25" from a dark sky. Not sure you can see it at all with a small telescope in the city but it should show nicely with an 8" or larger telescope.
If you're running SkySafari ignore the fact they list it at 13.5 magnitude. I estimate it to be closer to 8-9th magnitude. But bear in mind it'll look fainter than that due to low surface brightness of comets. 
05h 28' RA
+13 32' DEC

Kent B


Roy Diffrient
 

Alas, C/2020 M3 ATLAS is reported to be slowly fading.  But for those who may observe before dawn there is comet C/2020 S3 Erasmus, appearing low in the southeast and brightening now on the way to 6th or perhaps 5th magnitude.  A great long tail is reported.

Good comet info is available here:


The Space Weather site for today includes an observing report on Erasmus:


Let us know what you see!

Roy


On Nov 21, 2020, at 7:19 AM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Yes I tried the other night from here and no go. Shows how important the sky quality is. The comet was easy in the 4 inch from Coinjock a couple of days ago. Amazing how widely spread brightness reports for comets are.

On Saturday, November 21, 2020, 7:01:27 AM EST, charles jagow <chuck@...> wrote:


Tried last night @ Rott’n Paws with the 12” Dob and could not see the comet or even anything remotely fuzzy or ANYTHING in the area of the comet.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Kent Blackwell <kent@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Friday, November 20, 2020 at 9:55 AM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] What's in the sky?

 

November 20, 2020
Telescope fitted with a solar filter:: Look for a fairly large sunspot on the solar meridian. You'll probably need about 20x to see it. 
Telescope with a H-Alpha filter: A large prominence on the eastern limb, as well as several interesting filaments around the above mentioned sunspot.

In the night sky, Mars is slipping away so its angular size continues to shrink. Look fast, if you haven't already.
There's a fairly bright telescopic comet in Orion: C/2020 M3 ATLAS. It's beautiful in the 25" from a dark sky. Not sure you can see it at all with a small telescope in the city but it should show nicely with an 8" or larger telescope.
If you're running SkySafari ignore the fact they list it at 13.5 magnitude. I estimate it to be closer to 8-9th magnitude. But bear in mind it'll look fainter than that due to low surface brightness of comets. 
05h 28' RA
+13 32' DEC

Kent B


Jim Tallman
 

Here is a shot I took today. More than one spot group :)






On Nov 21, 2020 at 07:01, charles jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

Tried last night @ Rott’n Paws with the 12” Dob and could not see the comet or even anything remotely fuzzy or ANYTHING in the area of the comet.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Kent Blackwell <kent@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Friday, November 20, 2020 at 9:55 AM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] What's in the sky?

 

November 20, 2020
Telescope fitted with a solar filter:: Look for a fairly large sunspot on the solar meridian. You'll probably need about 20x to see it. 
Telescope with a H-Alpha filter: A large prominence on the eastern limb, as well as several interesting filaments around the above mentioned sunspot.

In the night sky, Mars is slipping away so its angular size continues to shrink. Look fast, if you haven't already.
There's a fairly bright telescopic comet in Orion: C/2020 M3 ATLAS. It's beautiful in the 25" from a dark sky. Not sure you can see it at all with a small telescope in the city but it should show nicely with an 8" or larger telescope.
If you're running SkySafari ignore the fact they list it at 13.5 magnitude. I estimate it to be closer to 8-9th magnitude. But bear in mind it'll look fainter than that due to low surface brightness of comets. 
05h 28' RA
+13 32' DEC

Kent B


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512