Uranometria 2000.0


George Reynolds
 

I don't get out to really dark skies very often, so I don't use the Willmann-Bell (RIP) book, Uranometria 2000.0 very often, but It is truly a great resource for stargazing.  Today I actually read the "Acknowledgements" (which I usually skip), and was delighted to find in the 2001 edition of Uranometria our friend Kent Blackwell mentioned as providing valuable assistance to the authors/editors Wil Tirion, Barry Rappaport, and Will Remaklus.  (Is he the son of Perry Remaklus of Willmann-Bell (RIP)?)

Congratulations (belatedly), Kent!

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Kent Blackwell
 

I haven't used a printed star atlas in decades but Uranometria is among the very best of the lot. Gosh, I started out with Norton's Star Atlas. Even when I got mine in the sixties it had already been in print for years. I graduated from that to the huge Skalnate Pleso, followed by the SAO (Smithsononian Astrophysical Observatory) Atlas.. When the Skalnate Pleso ceased publication Perry Ramakalus published a similar atlas, The Sky Atlas 2000. That remained my reference until he brought out the Uranometria. 

I abandoned all with the release of the electronic star atlas, SkyTools . I've now abandoned that for SkySafari on my smartphone. It's amazing how technology changes, making it easier for us to navigate the night sky.

Kent


George Reynolds
 

Kent,

You kept your observing logs in SkyTools.  What do you do now?  Does Sky Safari have such a feature?  (I only have the free version on my phone.)

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Thursday, August 12, 2021, 10:51:21 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


I haven't used a printed star atlas in decades but Uranometria is among the very best of the lot. Gosh, I started out with Norton's Star Atlas. Even when I got mine in the sixties it had already been in print for years. I graduated from that to the huge Skalnate Pleso, followed by the SAO (Smithsononian Astrophysical Observatory) Atlas.. When the Skalnate Pleso ceased publication Perry Ramakalus published a similar atlas, The Sky Atlas 2000. That remained my reference until he brought out the Uranometria. 

I abandoned all with the release of the electronic star atlas, SkyTools . I've now abandoned that for SkySafari on my smartphone. It's amazing how technology changes, making it easier for us to navigate the night sky.


Kent


jimcoble2000
 

I still like the broad picture an atlas gives
I use a combo of the two

On Thursday, August 12, 2021, 10:51:21 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


I haven't used a printed star atlas in decades but Uranometria is among the very best of the lot. Gosh, I started out with Norton's Star Atlas. Even when I got mine in the sixties it had already been in print for years. I graduated from that to the huge Skalnate Pleso, followed by the SAO (Smithsononian Astrophysical Observatory) Atlas.. When the Skalnate Pleso ceased publication Perry Ramakalus published a similar atlas, The Sky Atlas 2000. That remained my reference until he brought out the Uranometria. 

I abandoned all with the release of the electronic star atlas, SkyTools . I've now abandoned that for SkySafari on my smartphone. It's amazing how technology changes, making it easier for us to navigate the night sky.

Kent


Dale Carey
 

I have a 1960 Atlas Stellarum with all the pages, plastic overlays, index, ect.ect. This thing took me forever to figure out, in fact, still working on it, although like Kent, 
my laminated Sky Atlas 2000 and Starry Night Pro has taken over. I would like to donate this red copy of Atlas Stellarum or give it to someone who wants to play.
Any takers?
Dale 


-----Original Message-----
From: Kent Blackwell <kent@...>
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Aug 12, 2021 10:51 am
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Uranometria 2000.0

I haven't used a printed star atlas in decades but Uranometria is among the very best of the lot. Gosh, I started out with Norton's Star Atlas. Even when I got mine in the sixties it had already been in print for years. I graduated from that to the huge Skalnate Pleso, followed by the SAO (Smithsononian Astrophysical Observatory) Atlas.. When the Skalnate Pleso ceased publication Perry Ramakalus published a similar atlas, The Sky Atlas 2000. That remained my reference until he brought out the Uranometria. 

I abandoned all with the release of the electronic star atlas, SkyTools . I've now abandoned that for SkySafari on my smartphone. It's amazing how technology changes, making it easier for us to navigate the night sky.

Kent