Short Lunar session tonight.


jimcoble2000
 

As clouds gathered there was an unexpected opening offering a chance at the first quarter moon. I was only able to get in about a half hour but some work was accomplished. The moon offers so much to see and the possibility of really deep observing is always present. Too many observers consider the moon a nuisance or only a pretty object but it truly does offer a lifetime of detail with a little knowledge.

There are very subtle observations that have profound implications available if you know where to look. One of these somewhat advanced observations was available tonight. If you look hard at some craters you will see that they are not really circular. This can be hard to notice due to the spherical shape of the surface. Close examination of the craters Ptolemaeus, Alphonsus, Albategnius shows they are really hexagonal in shape. A good terrestrial example is Meteor Crater in Arizona. All of these craters are not round at all. Incoming objects that impact planets or the moon expend their energy in non homogeneous crust. Previous fractures, faults, and weaknesses in the crust will control the way material is excavated out of the existing target rock during crater formation. These preexisting weaknesses alters the circular nature of the crater wall resulting in a deviation from what would be normally a circular crater wall in homogeneous crust. Hence the above mentioned crater hexagonal outlines. You can observe this in a telescope and or look up a picture of meteor crater in Arizona on the web.

On the moon, many craters have straight sides that seem to orient in common directions. Some early lunar observers, including mining geologists, who knew about lineament analysis saw this. They posited that the straight crater walls were controlled by preexisting deep seated fractures in the lunar crust far below the present surface. Look at these craters and see what you think.


Ian Stewart
 

Love the trio of craters that Ptolemaeus is a part of. Also that little but deep crater Ammonius in Ptolemaeus is most cool. Thanks for posting ... Cheers Ian

On 11/11/2021 10:49 PM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io wrote:
As clouds gathered there was an unexpected opening offering a chance at the first quarter moon. I was only able to get in about a half hour but some work was accomplished. The moon offers so much to see and the possibility of really deep observing is always present. Too many observers consider the moon a nuisance or only a pretty object but it truly does offer a lifetime of detail with a little knowledge.

There are very subtle observations that have profound implications available if you know where to look. One of these somewhat advanced observations was available tonight. If you look hard at some craters you will see that they are not really circular. This can be hard to notice due to the spherical shape of the surface. Close examination of the craters Ptolemaeus, Alphonsus, Albategnius shows they are really hexagonal in shape. A good terrestrial example is Meteor Crater in Arizona. All of these craters are not round at all. Incoming objects that impact planets or the moon expend their energy in non homogeneous crust. Previous fractures, faults, and weaknesses in the crust will control the way material is excavated out of the existing target rock during crater formation. These preexisting weaknesses alters the circular nature of the crater wall resulting in a deviation from what would be normally a circular crater wall in homogeneous crust. Hence the above mentioned crater hexagonal outlines. You can observe this in a telescope and or look up a picture of meteor crater in Arizona on the web.

On the moon, many craters have straight sides that seem to orient in common directions. Some early lunar observers, including mining geologists, who knew about lineament analysis saw this. They posited that the straight crater walls were controlled by preexisting deep seated fractures in the lunar crust far below the present surface. Look at these craters and see what you think.


jimcoble2000
 

you are welcome

On Saturday, November 13, 2021, 11:37:05 AM EST, Ian Stewart <ian@...> wrote:


Love the trio of craters that Ptolemaeus is a part of. Also that little but deep crater Ammonius in Ptolemaeus is most cool. Thanks for posting ... Cheers Ian

On 11/11/2021 10:49 PM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io wrote:
As clouds gathered there was an unexpected opening offering a chance at the first quarter moon. I was only able to get in about a half hour but some work was accomplished. The moon offers so much to see and the possibility of really deep observing is always present. Too many observers consider the moon a nuisance or only a pretty object but it truly does offer a lifetime of detail with a little knowledge.

There are very subtle observations that have profound implications available if you know where to look. One of these somewhat advanced observations was available tonight. If you look hard at some craters you will see that they are not really circular. This can be hard to notice due to the spherical shape of the surface. Close examination of the craters Ptolemaeus, Alphonsus, Albategnius shows they are really hexagonal in shape. A good terrestrial example is Meteor Crater in Arizona. All of these craters are not round at all. Incoming objects that impact planets or the moon expend their energy in non homogeneous crust. Previous fractures, faults, and weaknesses in the crust will control the way material is excavated out of the existing target rock during crater formation. These preexisting weaknesses alters the circular nature of the crater wall resulting in a deviation from what would be normally a circular crater wall in homogeneous crust. Hence the above mentioned crater hexagonal outlines. You can observe this in a telescope and or look up a picture of meteor crater in Arizona on the web.

On the moon, many craters have straight sides that seem to orient in common directions. Some early lunar observers, including mining geologists, who knew about lineament analysis saw this. They posited that the straight crater walls were controlled by preexisting deep seated fractures in the lunar crust far below the present surface. Look at these craters and see what you think.


George Reynolds
 

Mark,

We saw excellent views of the Moon Friday night at Cornland Park with the Nature Bus.  Mel Spruill and Jim Tallman had fantastic closeups, showing Ptolemaeus, Alphonsus, and Arzachel.  We were even privileged to see the Straight Wall (Rupes Recta), which is visible only briefly near the First Quarter Moon.  Thursday's Moon was about 1 day past First Quarter.  I have seen the Straight Wall before, but Thursday night's view was THE BEST I'VE EVER SEEN IT.

George

George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Thursday, November 11, 2021, 10:49:52 PM EST, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


As clouds gathered there was an unexpected opening offering a chance at the first quarter moon. I was only able to get in about a half hour but some work was accomplished. The moon offers so much to see and the possibility of really deep observing is always present. Too many observers consider the moon a nuisance or only a pretty object but it truly does offer a lifetime of detail with a little knowledge.

There are very subtle observations that have profound implications available if you know where to look. One of these somewhat advanced observations was available tonight. If you look hard at some craters you will see that they are not really circular. This can be hard to notice due to the spherical shape of the surface. Close examination of the craters Ptolemaeus, Alphonsus, Albategnius shows they are really hexagonal in shape. A good terrestrial example is Meteor Crater in Arizona. All of these craters are not round at all. Incoming objects that impact planets or the moon expend their energy in non homogeneous crust. Previous fractures, faults, and weaknesses in the crust will control the way material is excavated out of the existing target rock during crater formation. These preexisting weaknesses alters the circular nature of the crater wall resulting in a deviation from what would be normally a circular crater wall in homogeneous crust. Hence the above mentioned crater hexagonal outlines. You can observe this in a telescope and or look up a picture of meteor crater in Arizona on the web.

On the moon, many craters have straight sides that seem to orient in common directions. Some early lunar observers, including mining geologists, who knew about lineament analysis saw this. They posited that the straight crater walls were controlled by preexisting deep seated fractures in the lunar crust far below the present surface. Look at these craters and see what you think.


George Reynolds
 

Mark,

It's nice to know that I am not the only "Lunatic" in the group!  Good explanation of the craters on the Moon, mr. geologist.

George

George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Thursday, November 11, 2021, 10:49:52 PM EST, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


As clouds gathered there was an unexpected opening offering a chance at the first quarter moon. I was only able to get in about a half hour but some work was accomplished. The moon offers so much to see and the possibility of really deep observing is always present. Too many observers consider the moon a nuisance or only a pretty object but it truly does offer a lifetime of detail with a little knowledge.

There are very subtle observations that have profound implications available if you know where to look. One of these somewhat advanced observations was available tonight. If you look hard at some craters you will see that they are not really circular. This can be hard to notice due to the spherical shape of the surface. Close examination of the craters Ptolemaeus, Alphonsus, Albategnius shows they are really hexagonal in shape. A good terrestrial example is Meteor Crater in Arizona. All of these craters are not round at all. Incoming objects that impact planets or the moon expend their energy in non homogeneous crust. Previous fractures, faults, and weaknesses in the crust will control the way material is excavated out of the existing target rock during crater formation. These preexisting weaknesses alters the circular nature of the crater wall resulting in a deviation from what would be normally a circular crater wall in homogeneous crust. Hence the above mentioned crater hexagonal outlines. You can observe this in a telescope and or look up a picture of meteor crater in Arizona on the web.

On the moon, many craters have straight sides that seem to orient in common directions. Some early lunar observers, including mining geologists, who knew about lineament analysis saw this. They posited that the straight crater walls were controlled by preexisting deep seated fractures in the lunar crust far below the present surface. Look at these craters and see what you think.