Planetary Nebulae


Kent Blackwell
 

I rolled out the 16" f/6 last night in the very light polluted skies of Virginia Beach.
Have any of you seen the illusive planetary nebula NGC 4361 in Corvus? It's an easy target with large telescopes in dark skies but a bit of a challenge in the city. Surprisingly, we even saw it in Mark O. Explore Scientific 127mm refractor using a Lumicon OIII Type 3 filter. We also saw it with one of my favorite filters, the Orion UltraBlock.
I have challenge. Has anyone ever seen the planetary nebula ARO 180 in Hercules? Don't let the fairly bright 12.8 magnitude fool you; the surface brightness is quite low. I saw it in 2013 with the 25" from Coinjock but I pulled out every trick in the bag last night but could not convince myself I was seeing it with the 16". I tried the OIII filter, the OIII Type 3 filter as well as the Orion UltraBlock. No luck.


Ted Forte
 

ARO 180 might be better known as Abell 39. I also tried it from Virginia Beach skies (in the 18-inch) without success.

 

Even with the 30-inch in 21.5 skies it’s a bit difficult.  My notes say that the UHC worked and that the OIII didn’t. It’s large, round and extremely faint.

 

Ted

BBAA Southwest

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Kent Blackwell
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2022 5:17 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Planetary Nebulae

 

I rolled out the 16" f/6 last night in the very light polluted skies of Virginia Beach.

Have any of you seen the illusive planetary nebula NGC 4361 in Corvus? It's an easy target with large telescopes in dark skies but a bit of a challenge in the city. Surprisingly, we even saw it in Mark O. Explore Scientific 127mm refractor using a Lumicon OIII Type 3 filter. We also saw it with one of my favorite filters, the Orion UltraBlock.

I have challenge. Has anyone ever seen the planetary nebula ARO 180 in Hercules? Don't let the fairly bright 12.8 magnitude fool you; the surface brightness is quite low. I saw it in 2013 with the 25" from Coinjock but I pulled out every trick in the bag last night but could not convince myself I was seeing it with the 16". I tried the OIII filter, the OIII Type 3 filter as well as the Orion UltraBlock. No luck.


charles jagow
 

My, that’s a long one.

 

 

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Kent Blackwell <kent@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, May 18, 2022 at 6:16 AM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Planetary Nebulae

 

I rolled out the 16" f/6 last night in the very light polluted skies of Virginia Beach.

Have any of you seen the illusive planetary nebula NGC 4361 in Corvus? It's an easy target with large telescopes in dark skies but a bit of a challenge in the city. Surprisingly, we even saw it in Mark O. Explore Scientific 127mm refractor using a Lumicon OIII Type 3 filter. We also saw it with one of my favorite filters, the Orion UltraBlock.

I have challenge. Has anyone ever seen the planetary nebula ARO 180 in Hercules? Don't let the fairly bright 12.8 magnitude fool you; the surface brightness is quite low. I saw it in 2013 with the 25" from Coinjock but I pulled out every trick in the bag last night but could not convince myself I was seeing it with the 16". I tried the OIII filter, the OIII Type 3 filter as well as the Orion UltraBlock. No luck.


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


charles jagow
 


Kent Blackwell
 

Ted, my notes from 2013 mention the same, the UHC (in my case the Orion UltraBlock) was better than the OIII. I figured I might have a chance with the OIII Type 3 but no such luck. 


Tony Mascolo
 

Hello Kent,

Hope you are well.

Beautiful telescope!!

Would not mind taking a look at some planets through that, must be outstanding.

I still remember that one night where everything was perfect looking at Saturn through your 25" on the EQ platform, was absolutely beautiful, looked like a Hubble image.  Still burned into my brain after all these years.  So rare to have good enough seeing for the big scopes to shine with planetary viewing, especially in this area under the jet stream all the time.

Have a great day!!

Later,

Tony


Ted Forte
 

Thanks Chuck!

 

Of course in my area, one can only appreciate the irony. A whole article about summer globulars from a place where summer observing is mostly non-existent. I can write the daily forecast for everyday from the last week in June to the first week in September right now: “cloudy with a significant chance of rain”.  Of course that’s better than holding your breath for three months praying not to burn.  March to June, we have HOT, DRY, and WINDY perfect fire weather.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of charles jagow
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2022 5:47 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Planetary Nebulae

 

Great Article Master Ted!

 

 


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


George Reynolds
 

I didn't know you got rain in Arizona.  I picture it as desert.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Wednesday, May 18, 2022, 12:46:27 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


Thanks Chuck!

 

Of course in my area, one can only appreciate the irony. A whole article about summer globulars from a place where summer observing is mostly non-existent. I can write the daily forecast for everyday from the last week in June to the first week in September right now: “cloudy with a significant chance of rain”.  Of course that’s better than holding your breath for three months praying not to burn.  March to June, we have HOT, DRY, and WINDY perfect fire weather.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of charles jagow
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2022 5:47 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Planetary Nebulae

 

Great Article Master Ted!

 

 


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


Ted Forte
 

It never rains, but man, it pours!

 

Next to the fire danger, it’s the biggest challenge to living here. To get out of my neighborhood  I have to cross two arroyos that cut across our primitive dirt road – the only access in or out of my area.  My neighbors just to my north have to cross three. It’s not unusual to have the road become completely impassible, for several hours (days if the road collapses) a couple of times during monsoon.  We’ve clocked debris in the wash traveling about 40mph and estimate a depth of 4 to 5 feet in the center of the larger wash when it is in full flood.  It’s most dangerous, however, when its shallow enough to tempt a crossing. Two of the three washes have claimed lives, from people attempting to drive through. We own and maintain our own roads – the 60 or so families up here comprise a road maintenance district. When the road collapses, or fills with debris, we are on our own to fix it.

 

Rural Arizona ain’t for sissies.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of George Reynolds via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2022 12:58 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Planetary Nebulae

 

I didn't know you got rain in Arizona.  I picture it as desert.

 

George

 


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia

Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 

 

 

On Wednesday, May 18, 2022, 12:46:27 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:

 

 

Thanks Chuck!

 

Of course in my area, one can only appreciate the irony. A whole article about summer globulars from a place where summer observing is mostly non-existent. I can write the daily forecast for everyday from the last week in June to the first week in September right now: “cloudy with a significant chance of rain”.  Of course that’s better than holding your breath for three months praying not to burn.  March to June, we have HOT, DRY, and WINDY perfect fire weather.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of charles jagow
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2022 5:47 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Planetary Nebulae

 

Great Article Master Ted!

 

 


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


George Reynolds
 

Ted,

I remember the low water crossings in San Antonio, Texas, and how some people died trying to drive across, but got washed away.  It sounds like it's even worse in your part of Arizona.  In San Antonio, it might not even be raining, but if there was a cloudburst in the Hill Country 50 miles north, the water would soon fill the low water crossings in town.

I remember my first rainstorm there as a 2LT at Fort Sam Houston.  When I drove my little 1960 Volkswagen beetle across a 3-4-inch flow across the road, I almost floated away.  I never attempted that again.  One time it stormed all night Saturday night and Sunday morning, and many streets and roads were underwater.  I had to get my map out to find the high ground and trace out a route to get to church Sunday morning.  The northbound lanes of Interstate 10 were completely underwater, and northbound traffic was routed up one of the lanes on the southbound side.

Another time we were at church on a Wednesday night, and it stormed all during the service.  To get home, on Loop 410 (I-410), an underpass was flooded (with a car in water up to its windows), so we had to take the exit and drive north several miles to rural Loop 1604 and go home the LONG way.  

Here in Tidewater there is local flooding in Norfolk (especially during high tides and nor'easters), and some low spots in Pungo and toward Sandbridge, as you know.  I live in Aragona Village, one of the highest areas in Virginia Beach, so I have no trouble with flooding.

I never realized that Arizona has a monsoon season.  We had one in Bangkok, Thailand.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Wednesday, May 18, 2022, 06:28:07 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


It never rains, but man, it pours!

 

Next to the fire danger, it’s the biggest challenge to living here. To get out of my neighborhood  I have to cross two arroyos that cut across our primitive dirt road – the only access in or out of my area.  My neighbors just to my north have to cross three. It’s not unusual to have the road become completely impassible, for several hours (days if the road collapses) a couple of times during monsoon.  We’ve clocked debris in the wash traveling about 40mph and estimate a depth of 4 to 5 feet in the center of the larger wash when it is in full flood.  It’s most dangerous, however, when its shallow enough to tempt a crossing. Two of the three washes have claimed lives, from people attempting to drive through. We own and maintain our own roads – the 60 or so families up here comprise a road maintenance district. When the road collapses, or fills with debris, we are on our own to fix it.

 

Rural Arizona ain’t for sissies.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of George Reynolds via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2022 12:58 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Planetary Nebulae

 

I didn't know you got rain in Arizona.  I picture it as desert.

 

George

 


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia

Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 

 

 

On Wednesday, May 18, 2022, 12:46:27 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:

 

 

Thanks Chuck!

 

Of course in my area, one can only appreciate the irony. A whole article about summer globulars from a place where summer observing is mostly non-existent. I can write the daily forecast for everyday from the last week in June to the first week in September right now: “cloudy with a significant chance of rain”.  Of course that’s better than holding your breath for three months praying not to burn.  March to June, we have HOT, DRY, and WINDY perfect fire weather.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of charles jagow
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2022 5:47 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Planetary Nebulae

 

Great Article Master Ted!

 

 


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


charles jagow
 

We need some monsoon here in Colorado.  No measurable rain since last August.

But, they are predicting snow on Friday night and Saturday of up to 6-10” go figure!

 

 

 

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "George Reynolds via groups.io" <pathfinder027@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Thursday, May 19, 2022 at 5:57 AM
To: "BackBayAstro@groups.io" <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Planetary Nebulae

 

Ted,

 

I remember the low water crossings in San Antonio, Texas, and how some people died trying to drive across, but got washed away.  It sounds like it's even worse in your part of Arizona.  In San Antonio, it might not even be raining, but if there was a cloudburst in the Hill Country 50 miles north, the water would soon fill the low water crossings in town.

 

I remember my first rainstorm there as a 2LT at Fort Sam Houston.  When I drove my little 1960 Volkswagen beetle across a 3-4-inch flow across the road, I almost floated away.  I never attempted that again.  One time it stormed all night Saturday night and Sunday morning, and many streets and roads were underwater.  I had to get my map out to find the high ground and trace out a route to get to church Sunday morning.  The northbound lanes of Interstate 10 were completely underwater, and northbound traffic was routed up one of the lanes on the southbound side.

 

Another time we were at church on a Wednesday night, and it stormed all during the service.  To get home, on Loop 410 (I-410), an underpass was flooded (with a car in water up to its windows), so we had to take the exit and drive north several miles to rural Loop 1604 and go home the LONG way.  

 

Here in Tidewater there is local flooding in Norfolk (especially during high tides and nor'easters), and some low spots in Pungo and toward Sandbridge, as you know.  I live in Aragona Village, one of the highest areas in Virginia Beach, so I have no trouble with flooding.

 

I never realized that Arizona has a monsoon season.  We had one in Bangkok, Thailand.

 

George

 


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia

Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 

 

 

On Wednesday, May 18, 2022, 06:28:07 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:

 

 

It never rains, but man, it pours!

 

Next to the fire danger, it’s the biggest challenge to living here. To get out of my neighborhood  I have to cross two arroyos that cut across our primitive dirt road – the only access in or out of my area.  My neighbors just to my north have to cross three. It’s not unusual to have the road become completely impassible, for several hours (days if the road collapses) a couple of times during monsoon.  We’ve clocked debris in the wash traveling about 40mph and estimate a depth of 4 to 5 feet in the center of the larger wash when it is in full flood.  It’s most dangerous, however, when its shallow enough to tempt a crossing. Two of the three washes have claimed lives, from people attempting to drive through. We own and maintain our own roads – the 60 or so families up here comprise a road maintenance district. When the road collapses, or fills with debris, we are on our own to fix it.

 

Rural Arizona ain’t for sissies.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of George Reynolds via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2022 12:58 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Planetary Nebulae

 

I didn't know you got rain in Arizona.  I picture it as desert.

 

George

 


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia

Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 

 

 

On Wednesday, May 18, 2022, 12:46:27 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:

 

 

Thanks Chuck!

 

Of course in my area, one can only appreciate the irony. A whole article about summer globulars from a place where summer observing is mostly non-existent. I can write the daily forecast for everyday from the last week in June to the first week in September right now: “cloudy with a significant chance of rain”.  Of course that’s better than holding your breath for three months praying not to burn.  March to June, we have HOT, DRY, and WINDY perfect fire weather.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of charles jagow
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2022 5:47 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Planetary Nebulae

 

Great Article Master Ted!

 

 


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


Roy Diffrient
 

After heavy rains, Dee and I encountered some flooding in Virginia Beach.  We were on 20th Street heading toward the Ocean Front late one night and suddenly found the road flooded.  It was more than a puddle, but I couldn’t see the extent or be sure of the width or depth in the dark, so we detoured way north to higher ground up around 40th St.

Roy Diffrient


On May 19, 2022, at 7:58 AM, George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...> wrote:


Ted,

I remember the low water crossings in San Antonio, Texas, and how some people died trying to drive across, but got washed away.  It sounds like it's even worse in your part of Arizona.  In San Antonio, it might not even be raining, but if there was a cloudburst in the Hill Country 50 miles north, the water would soon fill the low water crossings in town.

I remember my first rainstorm there as a 2LT at Fort Sam Houston.  When I drove my little 1960 Volkswagen beetle across a 3-4-inch flow across the road, I almost floated away.  I never attempted that again.  One time it stormed all night Saturday night and Sunday morning, and many streets and roads were underwater.  I had to get my map out to find the high ground and trace out a route to get to church Sunday morning.  The northbound lanes of Interstate 10 were completely underwater, and northbound traffic was routed up one of the lanes on the southbound side.

Another time we were at church on a Wednesday night, and it stormed all during the service.  To get home, on Loop 410 (I-410), an underpass was flooded (with a car in water up to its windows), so we had to take the exit and drive north several miles to rural Loop 1604 and go home the LONG way.  

Here in Tidewater there is local flooding in Norfolk (especially during high tides and nor'easters), and some low spots in Pungo and toward Sandbridge, as you know.  I live in Aragona Village, one of the highest areas in Virginia Beach, so I have no trouble with flooding.

I never realized that Arizona has a monsoon season.  We had one in Bangkok, Thailand.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Wednesday, May 18, 2022, 06:28:07 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


It never rains, but man, it pours!

 

Next to the fire danger, it’s the biggest challenge to living here. To get out of my neighborhood  I have to cross two arroyos that cut across our primitive dirt road – the only access in or out of my area.  My neighbors just to my north have to cross three. It’s not unusual to have the road become completely impassible, for several hours (days if the road collapses) a couple of times during monsoon.  We’ve clocked debris in the wash traveling about 40mph and estimate a depth of 4 to 5 feet in the center of the larger wash when it is in full flood.  It’s most dangerous, however, when its shallow enough to tempt a crossing. Two of the three washes have claimed lives, from people attempting to drive through. We own and maintain our own roads – the 60 or so families up here comprise a road maintenance district. When the road collapses, or fills with debris, we are on our own to fix it.

 

Rural Arizona ain’t for sissies.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of George Reynolds via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2022 12:58 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Planetary Nebulae

 

I didn't know you got rain in Arizona.  I picture it as desert.

 

George

 


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia

Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 

 

 

On Wednesday, May 18, 2022, 12:46:27 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:

 

 

Thanks Chuck!

 

Of course in my area, one can only appreciate the irony. A whole article about summer globulars from a place where summer observing is mostly non-existent. I can write the daily forecast for everyday from the last week in June to the first week in September right now: “cloudy with a significant chance of rain”.  Of course that’s better than holding your breath for three months praying not to burn.  March to June, we have HOT, DRY, and WINDY perfect fire weather.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of charles jagow
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2022 5:47 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Planetary Nebulae

 

Great Article Master Ted!

 

 


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory