Observing last night


jimcoble2000
 

Had an excellent, if a drenched night, last evening. Kent you were right, we watched the fog roll across our site last night around 2300. As Charles used to say "I wish it would rain so things would dry out".

One thing you can say about fog is that the seeing will be outstanding. It was. Transparency was a ten last night and there were almost no bugs out which made for a fine night of observing. The milky way at midnight was quite bright. One of the fun things last night was an unusual umbrella that Jim T gave me. The house across the way had a couple of porch lights which were a slight pain. Fortunately they were behind me though. Jim has this neat asymmetric umbrella sun shade that can be attached anywhere by a clamp. This he clamped to the back of my chair providing instant shade. Neat, very neat. I owe you Jim.

Lots of globulars last night starting with the Ghost Globular in Libra NGC 5897. This is dim diffuse but fairly big assembly of stars lower down in the south west sky. One of my favorite globs. I watched as it emerged out of the gloom as the sky got darker. You need to wait until 2230 to really see it. M-10 was quite detailed and easily studied. To end the night we observed two of my other favorites, NGC 6522 and NGC 6528. These two objects are interesting in that they are found in a unique region known as Baade's Window. This is a clear passage through the center of the Milky Way. This allows you to see through to the other side of the galaxy. These two globulars are on the other side of the galaxy and seen through this clear window. They both fall into one view at 50X. One is significantly brighter that the other. There is a nice star background in the fov. M-22 lies close by and is a good easy object. Another favorite is NGC 6144. This dim globular lies next to Antares so the light of the star drowns out this subtle object. Many peopel never see it against the glow of the bright star in Scorpius. Most go to M4, a much easier and large object. That also looked quite good with it's linear chain of stars through the center.

The comet was observed. It seems to be developing a central condensation. Jim, without prompting, noted a very short tail in the position i noted. That is always nice, having confirmation of an observation unasked for. Lends credibility to what you thing you saw. The comet is moving now a bit to the south every night.

Fog was a low layer about 20 to 30 feet high off the ground. The area is dead flat near the Dismal Swamp on a terrace. I thought it would be wet so was running full heaters from the git go.  Good decision. Midnight the Milky way just arched across the sky. Scorpius was entirely visible when we quite, one big constellation. Thanks Jim. Quite a night. Good coffee. Got home at 1 and did not get to bed until 0230.


Roy Diffrient
 

Thanks Mark.  Onward through the fog.  Hope everything dries out okay.

Roy 


On Jun 25, 2022, at 6:47 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Had an excellent, if a drenched night, last evening. Kent you were right, we watched the fog roll across our site last night around 2300. As Charles used to say "I wish it would rain so things would dry out".

One thing you can say about fog is that the seeing will be outstanding. It was. Transparency was a ten last night and there were almost no bugs out which made for a fine night of observing. The milky way at midnight was quite bright. One of the fun things last night was an unusual umbrella that Jim T gave me. The house across the way had a couple of porch lights which were a slight pain. Fortunately they were behind me though. Jim has this neat asymmetric umbrella sun shade that can be attached anywhere by a clamp. This he clamped to the back of my chair providing instant shade. Neat, very neat. I owe you Jim.

Lots of globulars last night starting with the Ghost Globular in Libra NGC 5897. This is dim diffuse but fairly big assembly of stars lower down in the south west sky. One of my favorite globs. I watched as it emerged out of the gloom as the sky got darker. You need to wait until 2230 to really see it. M-10 was quite detailed and easily studied. To end the night we observed two of my other favorites, NGC 6522 and NGC 6528. These two objects are interesting in that they are found in a unique region known as Baade's Window. This is a clear passage through the center of the Milky Way. This allows you to see through to the other side of the galaxy. These two globulars are on the other side of the galaxy and seen through this clear window. They both fall into one view at 50X. One is significantly brighter that the other. There is a nice star background in the fov. M-22 lies close by and is a good easy object. Another favorite is NGC 6144. This dim globular lies next to Antares so the light of the star drowns out this subtle object. Many peopel never see it against the glow of the bright star in Scorpius. Most go to M4, a much easier and large object. That also looked quite good with it's linear chain of stars through the center.

The comet was observed. It seems to be developing a central condensation. Jim, without prompting, noted a very short tail in the position i noted. That is always nice, having confirmation of an observation unasked for. Lends credibility to what you thing you saw. The comet is moving now a bit to the south every night.

Fog was a low layer about 20 to 30 feet high off the ground. The area is dead flat near the Dismal Swamp on a terrace. I thought it would be wet so was running full heaters from the git go.  Good decision. Midnight the Milky way just arched across the sky. Scorpius was entirely visible when we quite, one big constellation. Thanks Jim. Quite a night. Good coffee. Got home at 1 and did not get to bed until 0230.


jimcoble2000
 

Yikes! Lot of typos. That's what I get for doing this on 4 hours sleep.

On Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 09:36:24 AM EDT, Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...> wrote:


Wasn't aware of the NGC globulars 5897, 6522, 6528, and 6144.  Will give them a look see this evening.  Good viewing report Mark.  Thanks 

On June 25, 2022 at 6:47 AM Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Had an excellent, if a drenched night, last evening. Kent you were right, we watched the fog roll across our site last night around 2300. As Charles used to say "I wish it would rain so things would dry out".

One thing you can say about fog is that the seeing will be outstanding. It was. Transparency was a ten last night and there were almost no bugs out which made for a fine night of observing. The milky way at midnight was quite bright. One of the fun things last night was an unusual umbrella that Jim T gave me. The house across the way had a couple of porch lights which were a slight pain. Fortunately they were behind me though. Jim has this neat asymmetric umbrella sun shade that can be attached anywhere by a clamp. This he clamped to the back of my chair providing instant shade. Neat, very neat. I owe you Jim.

Lots of globulars last night starting with the Ghost Globular in Libra NGC 5897. This is dim diffuse but fairly big assembly of stars lower down in the south west sky. One of my favorite globs. I watched as it emerged out of the gloom as the sky got darker. You need to wait until 2230 to really see it. M-10 was quite detailed and easily studied. To end the night we observed two of my other favorites, NGC 6522 and NGC 6528. These two objects are interesting in that they are found in a unique region known as Baade's Window. This is a clear passage through the center of the Milky Way. This allows you to see through to the other side of the galaxy. These two globulars are on the other side of the galaxy and seen through this clear window. They both fall into one view at 50X. One is significantly brighter that the other. There is a nice star background in the fov. M-22 lies close by and is a good easy object. Another favorite is NGC 6144. This dim globular lies next to Antares so the light of the star drowns out this subtle object. Many peopel never see it against the glow of the bright star in Scorpius. Most go to M4, a much easier and large object. That also looked quite good with it's linear chain of stars through the center.

The comet was observed. It seems to be developing a central condensation. Jim, without prompting, noted a very short tail in the position i noted. That is always nice, having confirmation of an observation unasked for. Lends credibility to what you thing you saw. The comet is moving now a bit to the south every night.

Fog was a low layer about 20 to 30 feet high off the ground. The area is dead flat near the Dismal Swamp on a terrace. I thought it would be wet so was running full heaters from the git go.  Good decision. Midnight the Milky way just arched across the sky. Scorpius was entirely visible when we quite, one big constellation. Thanks Jim. Quite a night. Good coffee. Got home at 1 and did not get to bed until 0230.


 


jimcoble2000
 

Had to open up the telescope case inside to dry it out. Just like observing with the Hound of the Baskerville.

On Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 11:13:15 AM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Thanks Mark.  Onward through the fog.  Hope everything dries out okay.

Roy 


On Jun 25, 2022, at 6:47 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Had an excellent, if a drenched night, last evening. Kent you were right, we watched the fog roll across our site last night around 2300. As Charles used to say "I wish it would rain so things would dry out".

One thing you can say about fog is that the seeing will be outstanding. It was. Transparency was a ten last night and there were almost no bugs out which made for a fine night of observing. The milky way at midnight was quite bright. One of the fun things last night was an unusual umbrella that Jim T gave me. The house across the way had a couple of porch lights which were a slight pain. Fortunately they were behind me though. Jim has this neat asymmetric umbrella sun shade that can be attached anywhere by a clamp. This he clamped to the back of my chair providing instant shade. Neat, very neat. I owe you Jim.

Lots of globulars last night starting with the Ghost Globular in Libra NGC 5897. This is dim diffuse but fairly big assembly of stars lower down in the south west sky. One of my favorite globs. I watched as it emerged out of the gloom as the sky got darker. You need to wait until 2230 to really see it. M-10 was quite detailed and easily studied. To end the night we observed two of my other favorites, NGC 6522 and NGC 6528. These two objects are interesting in that they are found in a unique region known as Baade's Window. This is a clear passage through the center of the Milky Way. This allows you to see through to the other side of the galaxy. These two globulars are on the other side of the galaxy and seen through this clear window. They both fall into one view at 50X. One is significantly brighter that the other. There is a nice star background in the fov. M-22 lies close by and is a good easy object. Another favorite is NGC 6144. This dim globular lies next to Antares so the light of the star drowns out this subtle object. Many peopel never see it against the glow of the bright star in Scorpius. Most go to M4, a much easier and large object. That also looked quite good with it's linear chain of stars through the center.

The comet was observed. It seems to be developing a central condensation. Jim, without prompting, noted a very short tail in the position i noted. That is always nice, having confirmation of an observation unasked for. Lends credibility to what you thing you saw. The comet is moving now a bit to the south every night.

Fog was a low layer about 20 to 30 feet high off the ground. The area is dead flat near the Dismal Swamp on a terrace. I thought it would be wet so was running full heaters from the git go.  Good decision. Midnight the Milky way just arched across the sky. Scorpius was entirely visible when we quite, one big constellation. Thanks Jim. Quite a night. Good coffee. Got home at 1 and did not get to bed until 0230.


Ted Forte
 

Yes, nice report Mark. I have to do my summer globulars at times other than summer these days. The monsoon makes observing a rather rare event this time of year. 

 

Whenever I view NGC 6522 and 6528 I recall the evening of June 11, 2010 at your house.  You, Stan Hubbard, Jordan Bramble and I were observing together and Stan suggested viewing the pair.   I don’t know why that moment stands out so vividly; I’d seen them several times before that night and many times since, but I always associate those globulars with Stan and that observation. Maybe it’s the shared experience. Who knows?  I can think of dozens of objects that have strong personal associations like that, I’ll bet you can too.  It’s what makes our vocation so poignant, isn’t it? A thousand memorable moments under the stars.  

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2022 8:23 AM
To: kentblackwell <kent@...>; Roy Diffrient <mail@...>; BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>; Jim Tallman <jctallman@...>; Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Observing last night

 

Yikes! Lot of typos. That's what I get for doing this on 4 hours sleep.

 

On Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 09:36:24 AM EDT, Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...> wrote:

 

 

Wasn't aware of the NGC globulars 5897, 6522, 6528, and 6144.  Will give them a look see this evening.  Good viewing report Mark.  Thanks 

On June 25, 2022 at 6:47 AM Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Had an excellent, if a drenched night, last evening. Kent you were right, we watched the fog roll across our site last night around 2300. As Charles used to say "I wish it would rain so things would dry out".

 

One thing you can say about fog is that the seeing will be outstanding. It was. Transparency was a ten last night and there were almost no bugs out which made for a fine night of observing. The milky way at midnight was quite bright. One of the fun things last night was an unusual umbrella that Jim T gave me. The house across the way had a couple of porch lights which were a slight pain. Fortunately they were behind me though. Jim has this neat asymmetric umbrella sun shade that can be attached anywhere by a clamp. This he clamped to the back of my chair providing instant shade. Neat, very neat. I owe you Jim.

 

Lots of globulars last night starting with the Ghost Globular in Libra NGC 5897. This is dim diffuse but fairly big assembly of stars lower down in the south west sky. One of my favorite globs. I watched as it emerged out of the gloom as the sky got darker. You need to wait until 2230 to really see it. M-10 was quite detailed and easily studied. To end the night we observed two of my other favorites, NGC 6522 and NGC 6528. These two objects are interesting in that they are found in a unique region known as Baade's Window. This is a clear passage through the center of the Milky Way. This allows you to see through to the other side of the galaxy. These two globulars are on the other side of the galaxy and seen through this clear window. They both fall into one view at 50X. One is significantly brighter that the other. There is a nice star background in the fov. M-22 lies close by and is a good easy object. Another favorite is NGC 6144. This dim globular lies next to Antares so the light of the star drowns out this subtle object. Many peopel never see it against the glow of the bright star in Scorpius. Most go to M4, a much easier and large object. That also looked quite good with it's linear chain of stars through the center.

 

The comet was observed. It seems to be developing a central condensation. Jim, without prompting, noted a very short tail in the position i noted. That is always nice, having confirmation of an observation unasked for. Lends credibility to what you thing you saw. The comet is moving now a bit to the south every night.

 

Fog was a low layer about 20 to 30 feet high off the ground. The area is dead flat near the Dismal Swamp on a terrace. I thought it would be wet so was running full heaters from the git go.  Good decision. Midnight the Milky way just arched across the sky. Scorpius was entirely visible when we quite, one big constellation. Thanks Jim. Quite a night. Good coffee. Got home at 1 and did not get to bed until 0230.


 


preciousmyprecious
 

Thanks Mark. I'm gonna have a peak through Baade's Window tonight.


On Sat, Jun 25, 2022 at 12:18 PM, Ted Forte
<tedforte511@...> wrote:

Yes, nice report Mark. I have to do my summer globulars at times other than summer these days. The monsoon makes observing a rather rare event this time of year. 

 

Whenever I view NGC 6522 and 6528 I recall the evening of June 11, 2010 at your house.  You, Stan Hubbard, Jordan Bramble and I were observing together and Stan suggested viewing the pair.   I don’t know why that moment stands out so vividly; I’d seen them several times before that night and many times since, but I always associate those globulars with Stan and that observation. Maybe it’s the shared experience. Who knows?  I can think of dozens of objects that have strong personal associations like that, I’ll bet you can too.  It’s what makes our vocation so poignant, isn’t it? A thousand memorable moments under the stars.  

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2022 8:23 AM
To: kentblackwell <kent@...>; Roy Diffrient <mail@...>; BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>; Jim Tallman <jctallman@...>; Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Observing last night

 

Yikes! Lot of typos. That's what I get for doing this on 4 hours sleep.

 

On Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 09:36:24 AM EDT, Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...> wrote:

 

 

Wasn't aware of the NGC globulars 5897, 6522, 6528, and 6144.  Will give them a look see this evening.  Good viewing report Mark.  Thanks 

On June 25, 2022 at 6:47 AM Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Had an excellent, if a drenched night, last evening. Kent you were right, we watched the fog roll across our site last night around 2300. As Charles used to say "I wish it would rain so things would dry out".

 

One thing you can say about fog is that the seeing will be outstanding. It was. Transparency was a ten last night and there were almost no bugs out which made for a fine night of observing. The milky way at midnight was quite bright. One of the fun things last night was an unusual umbrella that Jim T gave me. The house across the way had a couple of porch lights which were a slight pain. Fortunately they were behind me though. Jim has this neat asymmetric umbrella sun shade that can be attached anywhere by a clamp. This he clamped to the back of my chair providing instant shade. Neat, very neat. I owe you Jim.

 

Lots of globulars last night starting with the Ghost Globular in Libra NGC 5897. This is dim diffuse but fairly big assembly of stars lower down in the south west sky. One of my favorite globs. I watched as it emerged out of the gloom as the sky got darker. You need to wait until 2230 to really see it. M-10 was quite detailed and easily studied. To end the night we observed two of my other favorites, NGC 6522 and NGC 6528. These two objects are interesting in that they are found in a unique region known as Baade's Window. This is a clear passage through the center of the Milky Way. This allows you to see through to the other side of the galaxy. These two globulars are on the other side of the galaxy and seen through this clear window. They both fall into one view at 50X. One is significantly brighter that the other. There is a nice star background in the fov. M-22 lies close by and is a good easy object. Another favorite is NGC 6144. This dim globular lies next to Antares so the light of the star drowns out this subtle object. Many peopel never see it against the glow of the bright star in Scorpius. Most go to M4, a much easier and large object. That also looked quite good with it's linear chain of stars through the center.

 

The comet was observed. It seems to be developing a central condensation. Jim, without prompting, noted a very short tail in the position i noted. That is always nice, having confirmation of an observation unasked for. Lends credibility to what you thing you saw. The comet is moving now a bit to the south every night.

 

Fog was a low layer about 20 to 30 feet high off the ground. The area is dead flat near the Dismal Swamp on a terrace. I thought it would be wet so was running full heaters from the git go.  Good decision. Midnight the Milky way just arched across the sky. Scorpius was entirely visible when we quite, one big constellation. Thanks Jim. Quite a night. Good coffee. Got home at 1 and did not get to bed until 0230.


 


jimcoble2000
 

be sure to lift the shades

On Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 12:47:11 PM EDT, preciousmyprecious via groups.io <preciousmyprecious@...> wrote:


Thanks Mark. I'm gonna have a peak through Baade's Window tonight.


On Sat, Jun 25, 2022 at 12:18 PM, Ted Forte
<tedforte511@...> wrote:

Yes, nice report Mark. I have to do my summer globulars at times other than summer these days. The monsoon makes observing a rather rare event this time of year. 

 

Whenever I view NGC 6522 and 6528 I recall the evening of June 11, 2010 at your house.  You, Stan Hubbard, Jordan Bramble and I were observing together and Stan suggested viewing the pair.   I don’t know why that moment stands out so vividly; I’d seen them several times before that night and many times since, but I always associate those globulars with Stan and that observation. Maybe it’s the shared experience. Who knows?  I can think of dozens of objects that have strong personal associations like that, I’ll bet you can too.  It’s what makes our vocation so poignant, isn’t it? A thousand memorable moments under the stars.  

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2022 8:23 AM
To: kentblackwell <kent@...>; Roy Diffrient <mail@...>; BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>; Jim Tallman <jctallman@...>; Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Observing last night

 

Yikes! Lot of typos. That's what I get for doing this on 4 hours sleep.

 

On Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 09:36:24 AM EDT, Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...> wrote:

 

 

Wasn't aware of the NGC globulars 5897, 6522, 6528, and 6144.  Will give them a look see this evening.  Good viewing report Mark.  Thanks 

On June 25, 2022 at 6:47 AM Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Had an excellent, if a drenched night, last evening. Kent you were right, we watched the fog roll across our site last night around 2300. As Charles used to say "I wish it would rain so things would dry out".

 

One thing you can say about fog is that the seeing will be outstanding. It was. Transparency was a ten last night and there were almost no bugs out which made for a fine night of observing. The milky way at midnight was quite bright. One of the fun things last night was an unusual umbrella that Jim T gave me. The house across the way had a couple of porch lights which were a slight pain. Fortunately they were behind me though. Jim has this neat asymmetric umbrella sun shade that can be attached anywhere by a clamp. This he clamped to the back of my chair providing instant shade. Neat, very neat. I owe you Jim.

 

Lots of globulars last night starting with the Ghost Globular in Libra NGC 5897. This is dim diffuse but fairly big assembly of stars lower down in the south west sky. One of my favorite globs. I watched as it emerged out of the gloom as the sky got darker. You need to wait until 2230 to really see it. M-10 was quite detailed and easily studied. To end the night we observed two of my other favorites, NGC 6522 and NGC 6528. These two objects are interesting in that they are found in a unique region known as Baade's Window. This is a clear passage through the center of the Milky Way. This allows you to see through to the other side of the galaxy. These two globulars are on the other side of the galaxy and seen through this clear window. They both fall into one view at 50X. One is significantly brighter that the other. There is a nice star background in the fov. M-22 lies close by and is a good easy object. Another favorite is NGC 6144. This dim globular lies next to Antares so the light of the star drowns out this subtle object. Many peopel never see it against the glow of the bright star in Scorpius. Most go to M4, a much easier and large object. That also looked quite good with it's linear chain of stars through the center.

 

The comet was observed. It seems to be developing a central condensation. Jim, without prompting, noted a very short tail in the position i noted. That is always nice, having confirmation of an observation unasked for. Lends credibility to what you thing you saw. The comet is moving now a bit to the south every night.

 

Fog was a low layer about 20 to 30 feet high off the ground. The area is dead flat near the Dismal Swamp on a terrace. I thought it would be wet so was running full heaters from the git go.  Good decision. Midnight the Milky way just arched across the sky. Scorpius was entirely visible when we quite, one big constellation. Thanks Jim. Quite a night. Good coffee. Got home at 1 and did not get to bed until 0230.


 


jimcoble2000
 

I remember that Ted. Times sure have changed since then. I am a bit more creaky now. I think your schedule would just about kill me!

Yes what sticks with you is pretty hard to define. That quasar that was 7 billion light years away certainly is one. Mars' moons another. Sirius' companion when it was a lot harder than this year. Anything with the word Palomar in front. Maybe one or two exceptions to that. That exploding bolide in Ursa and sonic boom it created certainly would qualify.

I also remember frozen telescope tubes at 2 in the morning.

On Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 01:18:32 PM EDT, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


be sure to lift the shades

On Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 12:47:11 PM EDT, preciousmyprecious via groups.io <preciousmyprecious@...> wrote:


Thanks Mark. I'm gonna have a peak through Baade's Window tonight.


On Sat, Jun 25, 2022 at 12:18 PM, Ted Forte
<tedforte511@...> wrote:

Yes, nice report Mark. I have to do my summer globulars at times other than summer these days. The monsoon makes observing a rather rare event this time of year. 

 

Whenever I view NGC 6522 and 6528 I recall the evening of June 11, 2010 at your house.  You, Stan Hubbard, Jordan Bramble and I were observing together and Stan suggested viewing the pair.   I don’t know why that moment stands out so vividly; I’d seen them several times before that night and many times since, but I always associate those globulars with Stan and that observation. Maybe it’s the shared experience. Who knows?  I can think of dozens of objects that have strong personal associations like that, I’ll bet you can too.  It’s what makes our vocation so poignant, isn’t it? A thousand memorable moments under the stars.  

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2022 8:23 AM
To: kentblackwell <kent@...>; Roy Diffrient <mail@...>; BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>; Jim Tallman <jctallman@...>; Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Observing last night

 

Yikes! Lot of typos. That's what I get for doing this on 4 hours sleep.

 

On Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 09:36:24 AM EDT, Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...> wrote:

 

 

Wasn't aware of the NGC globulars 5897, 6522, 6528, and 6144.  Will give them a look see this evening.  Good viewing report Mark.  Thanks 

On June 25, 2022 at 6:47 AM Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Had an excellent, if a drenched night, last evening. Kent you were right, we watched the fog roll across our site last night around 2300. As Charles used to say "I wish it would rain so things would dry out".

 

One thing you can say about fog is that the seeing will be outstanding. It was. Transparency was a ten last night and there were almost no bugs out which made for a fine night of observing. The milky way at midnight was quite bright. One of the fun things last night was an unusual umbrella that Jim T gave me. The house across the way had a couple of porch lights which were a slight pain. Fortunately they were behind me though. Jim has this neat asymmetric umbrella sun shade that can be attached anywhere by a clamp. This he clamped to the back of my chair providing instant shade. Neat, very neat. I owe you Jim.

 

Lots of globulars last night starting with the Ghost Globular in Libra NGC 5897. This is dim diffuse but fairly big assembly of stars lower down in the south west sky. One of my favorite globs. I watched as it emerged out of the gloom as the sky got darker. You need to wait until 2230 to really see it. M-10 was quite detailed and easily studied. To end the night we observed two of my other favorites, NGC 6522 and NGC 6528. These two objects are interesting in that they are found in a unique region known as Baade's Window. This is a clear passage through the center of the Milky Way. This allows you to see through to the other side of the galaxy. These two globulars are on the other side of the galaxy and seen through this clear window. They both fall into one view at 50X. One is significantly brighter that the other. There is a nice star background in the fov. M-22 lies close by and is a good easy object. Another favorite is NGC 6144. This dim globular lies next to Antares so the light of the star drowns out this subtle object. Many peopel never see it against the glow of the bright star in Scorpius. Most go to M4, a much easier and large object. That also looked quite good with it's linear chain of stars through the center.

 

The comet was observed. It seems to be developing a central condensation. Jim, without prompting, noted a very short tail in the position i noted. That is always nice, having confirmation of an observation unasked for. Lends credibility to what you thing you saw. The comet is moving now a bit to the south every night.

 

Fog was a low layer about 20 to 30 feet high off the ground. The area is dead flat near the Dismal Swamp on a terrace. I thought it would be wet so was running full heaters from the git go.  Good decision. Midnight the Milky way just arched across the sky. Scorpius was entirely visible when we quite, one big constellation. Thanks Jim. Quite a night. Good coffee. Got home at 1 and did not get to bed until 0230.


 


Jim Tallman
 

Yeah I agree Mark it was a very nice night for observing. I actually stayed out the whole time I didn't have a real study of this week this week so it was good to hang out. I think tonight I'll get out about 2:00 or 3:00 and try to image the whole Veil Nebula since the lights to the Northeast we're going to cooperate with us last night. It'll be better when it gets past midnight and it's in the Southwest. 

I was real surprised about not having to bugs eating us up either :-) it's always a plus.

And you're always welcome Mark I enjoy hanging out with you

Jim

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
Get Outlook for Android


From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...>
Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2022, 6:47 AM
To: kentblackwell <kent@...>; Roy Diffrient <mail@...>; David Wright <kd3wright@...>; BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>; Jim Tallman <jctallman@...>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Observing last night

Had an excellent, if a drenched night, last evening. Kent you were right, we watched the fog roll across our site last night around 2300. As Charles used to say "I wish it would rain so things would dry out".

One thing you can say about fog is that the seeing will be outstanding. It was. Transparency was a ten last night and there were almost no bugs out which made for a fine night of observing. The milky way at midnight was quite bright. One of the fun things last night was an unusual umbrella that Jim T gave me. The house across the way had a couple of porch lights which were a slight pain. Fortunately they were behind me though. Jim has this neat asymmetric umbrella sun shade that can be attached anywhere by a clamp. This he clamped to the back of my chair providing instant shade. Neat, very neat. I owe you Jim.

Lots of globulars last night starting with the Ghost Globular in Libra NGC 5897. This is dim diffuse but fairly big assembly of stars lower down in the south west sky. One of my favorite globs. I watched as it emerged out of the gloom as the sky got darker. You need to wait until 2230 to really see it. M-10 was quite detailed and easily studied. To end the night we observed two of my other favorites, NGC 6522 and NGC 6528. These two objects are interesting in that they are found in a unique region known as Baade's Window. This is a clear passage through the center of the Milky Way. This allows you to see through to the other side of the galaxy. These two globulars are on the other side of the galaxy and seen through this clear window. They both fall into one view at 50X. One is significantly brighter that the other. There is a nice star background in the fov. M-22 lies close by and is a good easy object. Another favorite is NGC 6144. This dim globular lies next to Antares so the light of the star drowns out this subtle object. Many peopel never see it against the glow of the bright star in Scorpius. Most go to M4, a much easier and large object. That also looked quite good with it's linear chain of stars through the center.

The comet was observed. It seems to be developing a central condensation. Jim, without prompting, noted a very short tail in the position i noted That is always nice, having confirmation of an observation unasked for. Lends credibility to what you thing you saw. The comet is moving now a bit to the south every night.

Fog was a low layer about 20 to 30 feet high off the ground. The area is dead flat near the Dismal Swamp on a terrace. I thought it would be wet so was running full heaters from the git go.  Good decision. Midnight the Milky way just arched across the sky. Scorpius was entirely visible when we quite, one big constellation. Thanks Jim. Quite a night. Good coffee. Got home at 1 and did not get to bed until 0230.


jimcoble2000
 

Just got finished with the girl scouts. Not so bad.

On Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 02:54:22 PM EDT, Jim Tallman <jctallman@...> wrote:


Yeah I agree Mark it was a very nice night for observing. I actually stayed out the whole time I didn't have a real study of this week this week so it was good to hang out. I think tonight I'll get out about 2:00 or 3:00 and try to image the whole Veil Nebula since the lights to the Northeast we're going to cooperate with us last night. It'll be better when it gets past midnight and it's in the Southwest. 

I was real surprised about not having to bugs eating us up either :-) it's always a plus.

And you're always welcome Mark I enjoy hanging out with you

Jim

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
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From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...>
Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2022, 6:47 AM
To: kentblackwell <kent@...>; Roy Diffrient <mail@...>; David Wright <kd3wright@...>; BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>; Jim Tallman <jctallman@...>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Observing last night

Had an excellent, if a drenched night, last evening. Kent you were right, we watched the fog roll across our site last night around 2300. As Charles used to say "I wish it would rain so things would dry out".

One thing you can say about fog is that the seeing will be outstanding. It was. Transparency was a ten last night and there were almost no bugs out which made for a fine night of observing. The milky way at midnight was quite bright. One of the fun things last night was an unusual umbrella that Jim T gave me. The house across the way had a couple of porch lights which were a slight pain. Fortunately they were behind me though. Jim has this neat asymmetric umbrella sun shade that can be attached anywhere by a clamp. This he clamped to the back of my chair providing instant shade. Neat, very neat. I owe you Jim.

Lots of globulars last night starting with the Ghost Globular in Libra NGC 5897. This is dim diffuse but fairly big assembly of stars lower down in the south west sky. One of my favorite globs. I watched as it emerged out of the gloom as the sky got darker. You need to wait until 2230 to really see it. M-10 was quite detailed and easily studied. To end the night we observed two of my other favorites, NGC 6522 and NGC 6528. These two objects are interesting in that they are found in a unique region known as Baade's Window. This is a clear passage through the center of the Milky Way. This allows you to see through to the other side of the galaxy. These two globulars are on the other side of the galaxy and seen through this clear window. They both fall into one view at 50X. One is significantly brighter that the other. There is a nice star background in the fov. M-22 lies close by and is a good easy object. Another favorite is NGC 6144. This dim globular lies next to Antares so the light of the star drowns out this subtle object. Many peopel never see it against the glow of the bright star in Scorpius. Most go to M4, a much easier and large object. That also looked quite good with it's linear chain of stars through the center.

The comet was observed. It seems to be developing a central condensation. Jim, without prompting, noted a very short tail in the position i noted That is always nice, having confirmation of an observation unasked for. Lends credibility to what you thing you saw. The comet is moving now a bit to the south every night.

Fog was a low layer about 20 to 30 feet high off the ground. The area is dead flat near the Dismal Swamp on a terrace. I thought it would be wet so was running full heaters from the git go.  Good decision. Midnight the Milky way just arched across the sky. Scorpius was entirely visible when we quite, one big constellation. Thanks Jim. Quite a night. Good coffee. Got home at 1 and did not get to bed until 0230.