Observing Last Night


Ian Stewart
 

Probably the best evening of lunar observing I have ever had. Seeing was near perfect. I don't have much in the way of eyepieces to get me past 250x but at that power the moon was rock solid. Terminator was in a wonderful position to see the basin in Clavius ringed by Porter and Rutherford both with peaks that were easy to pick out last night. Copernicus was awesome with the east wall brightly lit. I also had a good look at the Apollo 15 site - couldn't see any equipment though :-)
Cheers
Ian


Kent Blackwell
 

Seeing was rated high last night according to one of my apps. 


jimcoble2000
 

Yes it was a good night Ian. I only had about 1/2 an hours with it. Seeing the previous night was pretty poor. Saturday night was excellent. It sure varies in the winter. The good news is that the moon is riding pretty high so I can easily access it from the balcony. The balcony is pretty solid and I use Celestron vibration pads so the scope is quite steady. There is a double occultation of a couple of stars on Friday around 2055 (8:55 pm). The moon should be in a good position for me. You just need a barlow for the flag! Maybe two.

The straight wall is starting to show also. By looking at where the moon is illuminated from and examining the shadow you can see where the high elevation side of the fault is and the low elevation side. The low side is on the west side of the fault, same as the small crater Birt. It looks steep but is only a 20 degrees slope. Faults can be a bit complex sometimes. I believe the thinking is the straight wall exists because the west side of Ancient Thebit (not visible last night) subsided. BTW "fault" is defined as two rock units that have relative motion between the two. Fractures have no relative motion.

This is different from say the Lunar Alpine Valley which is a horst and graben type faulting (two normal faults) caused by extension of the crust. Think  \-/  where the two sides are pulled apart away from each other and the middle sinks down. You can see an example of this in Utah and Nevada. If you look on google maps, satellite view, going west from Salt Lake City toward Nevada on I-80 notice how, around West Wendover (on I -81), how the land has parallel hills and flats in a north south direction. If you zoom way out you can picture the entire section of that country being pulled apart (which it is, one day to become a sea way again). That is how the Alpine Valley on the moon formed. On Earth it is called Basin and Range.

I think I might start using google maps satellite view as a nice illustration for moon analogs.

On Wednesday, January 12, 2022, 09:40:36 AM EST, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Probably the best evening of lunar observing I have ever had. Seeing was near perfect. I don't have much in the way of eyepieces to get me past 250x but at that power the moon was rock solid. Terminator was in a wonderful position to see the basin in Clavius ringed by Porter and Rutherford both with peaks that were easy to pick out last night. Copernicus was awesome with the east wall brightly lit. I also had a good look at the Apollo 15 site - couldn't see any equipment though :-)
Cheers
Ian


Ian Stewart
 

Hey Mark thanks. Always enjoy your observations and explanations ... Cheers Ian

On 1/12/2022 10:24 AM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io wrote:
Yes it was a good night Ian. I only had about 1/2 an hours with it. Seeing the previous night was pretty poor. Saturday night was excellent. It sure varies in the winter. The good news is that the moon is riding pretty high so I can easily access it from the balcony. The balcony is pretty solid and I use Celestron vibration pads so the scope is quite steady. There is a double occultation of a couple of stars on Friday around 2055 (8:55 pm). The moon should be in a good position for me. You just need a barlow for the flag! Maybe two.

The straight wall is starting to show also. By looking at where the moon is illuminated from and examining the shadow you can see where the high elevation side of the fault is and the low elevation side. The low side is on the west side of the fault, same as the small crater Birt. It looks steep but is only a 20 degrees slope. Faults can be a bit complex sometimes. I believe the thinking is the straight wall exists because the west side of Ancient Thebit (not visible last night) subsided. BTW "fault" is defined as two rock units that have relative motion between the two. Fractures have no relative motion.

This is different from say the Lunar Alpine Valley which is a horst and graben type faulting (two normal faults) caused by extension of the crust. Think  \-/  where the two sides are pulled apart away from each other and the middle sinks down. You can see an example of this in Utah and Nevada. If you look on google maps, satellite view, going west from Salt Lake City toward Nevada on I-80 notice how, around West Wendover (on I -81), how the land has parallel hills and flats in a north south direction. If you zoom way out you can picture the entire section of that country being pulled apart (which it is, one day to become a sea way again). That is how the Alpine Valley on the moon formed. On Earth it is called Basin and Range.

I think I might start using google maps satellite view as a nice illustration for moon analogs.

On Wednesday, January 12, 2022, 09:40:36 AM EST, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Probably the best evening of lunar observing I have ever had. Seeing was near perfect. I don't have much in the way of eyepieces to get me past 250x but at that power the moon was rock solid. Terminator was in a wonderful position to see the basin in Clavius ringed by Porter and Rutherford both with peaks that were easy to pick out last night. Copernicus was awesome with the east wall brightly lit. I also had a good look at the Apollo 15 site - couldn't see any equipment though :-)
Cheers
Ian


jimcoble2000
 

I was easily able to split Rigel with no effort so I suspect the app was right.

On Wednesday, January 12, 2022, 10:10:50 AM EST, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


Seeing was rated high last night according to one of my apps. 


George Reynolds
 

Mark, 

That vast white area west of the Great Salt Lake -- Is that the Bonneville Salt Flats?  Was it once the floor of an even bigger (greater) Great Salt Lake?

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Wednesday, January 12, 2022, 10:24:57 AM EST, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Yes it was a good night Ian. I only had about 1/2 an hours with it. Seeing the previous night was pretty poor. Saturday night was excellent. It sure varies in the winter. The good news is that the moon is riding pretty high so I can easily access it from the balcony. The balcony is pretty solid and I use Celestron vibration pads so the scope is quite steady. There is a double occultation of a couple of stars on Friday around 2055 (8:55 pm). The moon should be in a good position for me. You just need a barlow for the flag! Maybe two.

The straight wall is starting to show also. By looking at where the moon is illuminated from and examining the shadow you can see where the high elevation side of the fault is and the low elevation side. The low side is on the west side of the fault, same as the small crater Birt. It looks steep but is only a 20 degrees slope. Faults can be a bit complex sometimes. I believe the thinking is the straight wall exists because the west side of Ancient Thebit (not visible last night) subsided. BTW "fault" is defined as two rock units that have relative motion between the two. Fractures have no relative motion.

This is different from say the Lunar Alpine Valley which is a horst and graben type faulting (two normal faults) caused by extension of the crust. Think  \-/  where the two sides are pulled apart away from each other and the middle sinks down. You can see an example of this in Utah and Nevada. If you look on google maps, satellite view, going west from Salt Lake City toward Nevada on I-80 notice how, around West Wendover (on I -81), how the land has parallel hills and flats in a north south direction. If you zoom way out you can picture the entire section of that country being pulled apart (which it is, one day to become a sea way again). That is how the Alpine Valley on the moon formed. On Earth it is called Basin and Range.

I think I might start using google maps satellite view as a nice illustration for moon analogs.

On Wednesday, January 12, 2022, 09:40:36 AM EST, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Probably the best evening of lunar observing I have ever had. Seeing was near perfect. I don't have much in the way of eyepieces to get me past 250x but at that power the moon was rock solid. Terminator was in a wonderful position to see the basin in Clavius ringed by Porter and Rutherford both with peaks that were easy to pick out last night. Copernicus was awesome with the east wall brightly lit. I also had a good look at the Apollo 15 site - couldn't see any equipment though :-)
Cheers
Ian


jimcoble2000
 

Hi George. It was nice to see you and your sister at Paneras last week.

Yes indeed the salt flats are just to the  west of West Wendover. That large white area that is sort of semi triangular. The entire region was once the shoreline of the ocean. California (as we know it today) did not exist at the time (at least where it is now). Later as the sea levels fell and the pieces of California, formed elsewhere, tacked itself on to the coast in stages, large, now inland, lakes were formed and then left high and dry to evaporate leaving a deposit of salt. End of beach front property in Utah!

On Wednesday, January 12, 2022, 05:18:25 PM EST, George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...> wrote:


Mark, 

That vast white area west of the Great Salt Lake -- Is that the Bonneville Salt Flats?  Was it once the floor of an even bigger (greater) Great Salt Lake?

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Wednesday, January 12, 2022, 10:24:57 AM EST, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Yes it was a good night Ian. I only had about 1/2 an hours with it. Seeing the previous night was pretty poor. Saturday night was excellent. It sure varies in the winter. The good news is that the moon is riding pretty high so I can easily access it from the balcony. The balcony is pretty solid and I use Celestron vibration pads so the scope is quite steady. There is a double occultation of a couple of stars on Friday around 2055 (8:55 pm). The moon should be in a good position for me. You just need a barlow for the flag! Maybe two.

The straight wall is starting to show also. By looking at where the moon is illuminated from and examining the shadow you can see where the high elevation side of the fault is and the low elevation side. The low side is on the west side of the fault, same as the small crater Birt. It looks steep but is only a 20 degrees slope. Faults can be a bit complex sometimes. I believe the thinking is the straight wall exists because the west side of Ancient Thebit (not visible last night) subsided. BTW "fault" is defined as two rock units that have relative motion between the two. Fractures have no relative motion.

This is different from say the Lunar Alpine Valley which is a horst and graben type faulting (two normal faults) caused by extension of the crust. Think  \-/  where the two sides are pulled apart away from each other and the middle sinks down. You can see an example of this in Utah and Nevada. If you look on google maps, satellite view, going west from Salt Lake City toward Nevada on I-80 notice how, around West Wendover (on I -81), how the land has parallel hills and flats in a north south direction. If you zoom way out you can picture the entire section of that country being pulled apart (which it is, one day to become a sea way again). That is how the Alpine Valley on the moon formed. On Earth it is called Basin and Range.

I think I might start using google maps satellite view as a nice illustration for moon analogs.

On Wednesday, January 12, 2022, 09:40:36 AM EST, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Probably the best evening of lunar observing I have ever had. Seeing was near perfect. I don't have much in the way of eyepieces to get me past 250x but at that power the moon was rock solid. Terminator was in a wonderful position to see the basin in Clavius ringed by Porter and Rutherford both with peaks that were easy to pick out last night. Copernicus was awesome with the east wall brightly lit. I also had a good look at the Apollo 15 site - couldn't see any equipment though :-)
Cheers
Ian