Observing last night


jimcoble2000
 

Actually got in a couple of hours of observing last night and accomplished quite a bit for a full moon night.

Though the full moon is regarded as the least interesting time for lunar observing there are features that can only be seen at this time. Observing the full moon is best done with a light blue filter, 82A. This enhances subtle albedo (brightness) contrasts normally difficult to see on the moon. Several interesting features are visible with patience.

The crater Schickard in the southern hemisphere of the moon lies just west of Tycho. Note that "west" implies being to the  relative left of the north and south poles. This is a bit confusing as tradition reverses east and west when looking at the moon. Telescopic image flips add to the fun. Just orient north and south and proceed from there; the easiest way to orient yourself. Schikard appears as an elongated crater being, close to the terminator. Under a blue filter, the crater appears to have a distinct central area of different albedo than the edges. The lighter middle part may be a coating from the Oriental impact. The middle part is also interpreted to be older. The darker ends are interpreted to be younger Imbrian basaltic lava flows, placed after the lighter midsection was created by the Oriental impact.. Exact dates are unknown but both are listed as from the Imbrian period of formation. The crater is actually round and larger than Clavius but appears oval due to visual perspective.

Aristarchus is a recent crater of very high albedo which actually lies atop a broad elevated plateau.  At full moon, with the filter, the plateau appears far darker than the surrounding mare lavas. It is interesting that only at full moon can the real differences in albedo be judged accurately. Aristarchus is very bright which is interpreted to be a young crater. Lunar soils darken with exposure and age. Also note that under the full moon, using a filter, the moon is dotted with tiny white very bright white craters. Like salt on a dark paper. Notice, with a few notable exception like Aristarchus and Copernicus, the vast majority of the small bright craters are quite tiny. Some are only dots. It appears that the last major impacts were quite small, the solar system having been swept of larger objects by that time. The Aristarchus Plateau is very distinct and diamond shaped elevated higher than the basin.

Looking at the Imbrian basin south of Sinus Iridium a subtle difference of shading can be detected in what appears a homogeneous Imbrian basin. Look at the eastern tip of Iridium projecting into the Imbrian Basin. Once again, under a blue filter, can you see the difference in albedo as a distinct darker area with a sinuous winding edge. This area has been mapped as two distinct age rock units. The darker is Eratosthenian (younger) than the surrounding Imbrian lavas that make up most of the basin by a pretty fair amount of time. I certainly can see quite a difference in appearance in parts of the Imbrian Basin but this does not show up on the USGS map of the moon as distinct units. Maybe the surface is different being more broken up. It certainly looks different.       


Kent Blackwell
 

I wish I knew as much about the moon as Mark. To be able to identity any craters at full moon is indeed a talent. 

--- jimcoble2000@... wrote:

From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>
To: kentblackwell <kent@...>, Roy Diffrient <mail@...>, BBAA Groups Io <backbayastro@groups.io>
Subject: Observing last night
Date: Sun, 1 Nov 2020 12:54:30 +0000 (UTC)

Actually got in a couple of hours of observing last night and accomplished quite a bit for a full moon night.

Though the full moon is regarded as the least interesting time for lunar observing there are features that can only be seen at this time. Observing the full moon is best done with a light blue filter, 82A. This enhances subtle albedo (brightness) contrasts normally difficult to see on the moon. Several interesting features are visible with patience.

The crater Schickard in the southern hemisphere of the moon lies just west of Tycho. Note that "west" implies being to the  relative left of the north and south poles. This is a bit confusing as tradition reverses east and west when looking at the moon. Telescopic image flips add to the fun. Just orient north and south and proceed from there; the easiest way to orient yourself. Schikard appears as an elongated crater being, close to the terminator. Under a blue filter, the crater appears to have a distinct central area of different albedo than the edges. The lighter middle part may be a coating from the Oriental impact. The middle part is also interpreted to be older. The darker ends are interpreted to be younger Imbrian basaltic lava flows, placed after the lighter midsection was created by the Oriental impact.. Exact dates are unknown but both are listed as from the Imbrian period of formation. The crater is actually round and larger than Clavius but appears oval due to visual perspective.

Aristarchus is a recent crater of very high albedo which actually lies atop a broad elevated plateau.  At full moon, with the filter, the plateau appears far darker than the surrounding mare lavas. It is interesting that only at full moon can the real differences in albedo be judged accurately. Aristarchus is very bright which is interpreted to be a young crater. Lunar soils darken with exposure and age. Also note that under the full moon, using a filter, the moon is dotted with tiny white very bright white craters. Like salt on a dark paper. Notice, with a few notable exception like Aristarchus and Copernicus, the vast majority of the small bright craters are quite tiny. Some are only dots. It appears that the last major impacts were quite small, the solar system having been swept of larger objects by that time. The Aristarchus Plateau is very distinct and diamond shaped elevated higher than the basin.

Looking at the Imbrian basin south of Sinus Iridium a subtle difference of shading can be detected in what appears a homogeneous Imbrian basin. Look at the eastern tip of Iridium projecting into the Imbrian Basin. Once again, under a blue filter, can you see the difference in albedo as a distinct darker area with a sinuous winding edge. This area has been mapped as two distinct age rock units. The darker is Eratosthenian (younger) than the surrounding Imbrian lavas that make up most of the basin by a pretty fair amount of time. I certainly can see quite a difference in appearance in parts of the Imbrian Basin but this does not show up on the USGS map of the moon as distinct units. Maybe the surface is different being more broken up. It certainly looks different.       


Roy Diffrient
 

Good observations Mark – wow, USGS lunar maps!  Just when I think I have everything I could possibly need for driveway astronomy ...

Roy


On Nov 1, 2020, at 7:54 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Actually got in a couple of hours of observing last night and accomplished quite a bit for a full moon night.

Though the full moon is regarded as the least interesting time for lunar observing there are features that can only be seen at this time. Observing the full moon is best done with a light blue filter, 82A. This enhances subtle albedo (brightness) contrasts normally difficult to see on the moon. Several interesting features are visible with patience.

The crater Schickard in the southern hemisphere of the moon lies just west of Tycho. Note that "west" implies being to the  relative left of the north and south poles. This is a bit confusing as tradition reverses east and west when looking at the moon. Telescopic image flips add to the fun. Just orient north and south and proceed from there; the easiest way to orient yourself. Schikard appears as an elongated crater being, close to the terminator. Under a blue filter, the crater appears to have a distinct central area of different albedo than the edges. The lighter middle part may be a coating from the Oriental impact. The middle part is also interpreted to be older. The darker ends are interpreted to be younger Imbrian basaltic lava flows, placed after the lighter midsection was created by the Oriental impact.. Exact dates are unknown but both are listed as from the Imbrian period of formation. The crater is actually round and larger than Clavius but appears oval due to visual perspective.

Aristarchus is a recent crater of very high albedo which actually lies atop a broad elevated plateau.  At full moon, with the filter, the plateau appears far darker than the surrounding mare lavas. It is interesting that only at full moon can the real differences in albedo be judged accurately. Aristarchus is very bright which is interpreted to be a young crater. Lunar soils darken with exposure and age. Also note that under the full moon, using a filter, the moon is dotted with tiny white very bright white craters. Like salt on a dark paper. Notice, with a few notable exception like Aristarchus and Copernicus, the vast majority of the small bright craters are quite tiny. Some are only dots. It appears that the last major impacts were quite small, the solar system having been swept of larger objects by that time. The Aristarchus Plateau is very distinct and diamond shaped elevated higher than the basin.

Looking at the Imbrian basin south of Sinus Iridium a subtle difference of shading can be detected in what appears a homogeneous Imbrian basin. Look at the eastern tip of Iridium projecting into the Imbrian Basin. Once again, under a blue filter, can you see the difference in albedo as a distinct darker area with a sinuous winding edge. This area has been mapped as two distinct age rock units. The darker is Eratosthenian (younger) than the surrounding Imbrian lavas that make up most of the basin by a pretty fair amount of time. I certainly can see quite a difference in appearance in parts of the Imbrian Basin but this does not show up on the USGS map of the moon as distinct units. Maybe the surface is different being more broken up. It certainly looks different.       


jimcoble2000
 

The only problem with the map is the physical size of the thing (huge). I need two servants like Egyptian scribes to hold it up against the wall.

On Sunday, November 1, 2020, 2:11:07 PM EST, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Good observations Mark – wow, USGS lunar maps!  Just when I think I have everything I could possibly need for driveway astronomy ...

Roy


On Nov 1, 2020, at 7:54 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Actually got in a couple of hours of observing last night and accomplished quite a bit for a full moon night.

Though the full moon is regarded as the least interesting time for lunar observing there are features that can only be seen at this time. Observing the full moon is best done with a light blue filter, 82A. This enhances subtle albedo (brightness) contrasts normally difficult to see on the moon. Several interesting features are visible with patience.

The crater Schickard in the southern hemisphere of the moon lies just west of Tycho. Note that "west" implies being to the  relative left of the north and south poles. This is a bit confusing as tradition reverses east and west when looking at the moon. Telescopic image flips add to the fun. Just orient north and south and proceed from there; the easiest way to orient yourself. Schikard appears as an elongated crater being, close to the terminator. Under a blue filter, the crater appears to have a distinct central area of different albedo than the edges. The lighter middle part may be a coating from the Oriental impact. The middle part is also interpreted to be older. The darker ends are interpreted to be younger Imbrian basaltic lava flows, placed after the lighter midsection was created by the Oriental impact.. Exact dates are unknown but both are listed as from the Imbrian period of formation. The crater is actually round and larger than Clavius but appears oval due to visual perspective.

Aristarchus is a recent crater of very high albedo which actually lies atop a broad elevated plateau.  At full moon, with the filter, the plateau appears far darker than the surrounding mare lavas. It is interesting that only at full moon can the real differences in albedo be judged accurately. Aristarchus is very bright which is interpreted to be a young crater. Lunar soils darken with exposure and age. Also note that under the full moon, using a filter, the moon is dotted with tiny white very bright white craters. Like salt on a dark paper. Notice, with a few notable exception like Aristarchus and Copernicus, the vast majority of the small bright craters are quite tiny. Some are only dots. It appears that the last major impacts were quite small, the solar system having been swept of larger objects by that time. The Aristarchus Plateau is very distinct and diamond shaped elevated higher than the basin.

Looking at the Imbrian basin south of Sinus Iridium a subtle difference of shading can be detected in what appears a homogeneous Imbrian basin. Look at the eastern tip of Iridium projecting into the Imbrian Basin. Once again, under a blue filter, can you see the difference in albedo as a distinct darker area with a sinuous winding edge. This area has been mapped as two distinct age rock units. The darker is Eratosthenian (younger) than the surrounding Imbrian lavas that make up most of the basin by a pretty fair amount of time. I certainly can see quite a difference in appearance in parts of the Imbrian Basin but this does not show up on the USGS map of the moon as distinct units. Maybe the surface is different being more broken up. It certainly looks different.       


Kent Blackwell
 

I know some Sherpas who might be available.

6 Plus

On Nov 1, 2020, at 2:16 PM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

The only problem with the map is the physical size of the thing (huge). I need two servants like Egyptian scribes to hold it up against the wall.

On Sunday, November 1, 2020, 2:11:07 PM EST, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Good observations Mark – wow, USGS lunar maps!  Just when I think I have everything I could possibly need for driveway astronomy ...

Roy


On Nov 1, 2020, at 7:54 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Actually got in a couple of hours of observing last night and accomplished quite a bit for a full moon night.

Though the full moon is regarded as the least interesting time for lunar observing there are features that can only be seen at this time. Observing the full moon is best done with a light blue filter, 82A. This enhances subtle albedo (brightness) contrasts normally difficult to see on the moon. Several interesting features are visible with patience.

The crater Schickard in the southern hemisphere of the moon lies just west of Tycho. Note that "west" implies being to the  relative left of the north and south poles. This is a bit confusing as tradition reverses east and west when looking at the moon. Telescopic image flips add to the fun. Just orient north and south and proceed from there; the easiest way to orient yourself. Schikard appears as an elongated crater being, close to the terminator. Under a blue filter, the crater appears to have a distinct central area of different albedo than the edges. The lighter middle part may be a coating from the Oriental impact. The middle part is also interpreted to be older. The darker ends are interpreted to be younger Imbrian basaltic lava flows, placed after the lighter midsection was created by the Oriental impact.. Exact dates are unknown but both are listed as from the Imbrian period of formation. The crater is actually round and larger than Clavius but appears oval due to visual perspective.

Aristarchus is a recent crater of very high albedo which actually lies atop a broad elevated plateau.  At full moon, with the filter, the plateau appears far darker than the surrounding mare lavas. It is interesting that only at full moon can the real differences in albedo be judged accurately. Aristarchus is very bright which is interpreted to be a young crater. Lunar soils darken with exposure and age. Also note that under the full moon, using a filter, the moon is dotted with tiny white very bright white craters. Like salt on a dark paper. Notice, with a few notable exception like Aristarchus and Copernicus, the vast majority of the small bright craters are quite tiny. Some are only dots. It appears that the last major impacts were quite small, the solar system having been swept of larger objects by that time. The Aristarchus Plateau is very distinct and diamond shaped elevated higher than the basin.

Looking at the Imbrian basin south of Sinus Iridium a subtle difference of shading can be detected in what appears a homogeneous Imbrian basin. Look at the eastern tip of Iridium projecting into the Imbrian Basin. Once again, under a blue filter, can you see the difference in albedo as a distinct darker area with a sinuous winding edge. This area has been mapped as two distinct age rock units. The darker is Eratosthenian (younger) than the surrounding Imbrian lavas that make up most of the basin by a pretty fair amount of time. I certainly can see quite a difference in appearance in parts of the Imbrian Basin but this does not show up on the USGS map of the moon as distinct units. Maybe the surface is different being more broken up. It certainly looks different.       


Matthew Cook
 

There's this recent invention you should look into Mark...duct tape.  Wonderful stuff.


On Nov 1, 2020, at 14:16, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

The only problem with the map is the physical size of the thing (huge). I need two servants like Egyptian scribes to hold it up against the wall.

On Sunday, November 1, 2020, 2:11:07 PM EST, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Good observations Mark – wow, USGS lunar maps!  Just when I think I have everything I could possibly need for driveway astronomy ...

Roy


On Nov 1, 2020, at 7:54 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Actually got in a couple of hours of observing last night and accomplished quite a bit for a full moon night.

Though the full moon is regarded as the least interesting time for lunar observing there are features that can only be seen at this time. Observing the full moon is best done with a light blue filter, 82A. This enhances subtle albedo (brightness) contrasts normally difficult to see on the moon. Several interesting features are visible with patience.

The crater Schickard in the southern hemisphere of the moon lies just west of Tycho. Note that "west" implies being to the  relative left of the north and south poles. This is a bit confusing as tradition reverses east and west when looking at the moon. Telescopic image flips add to the fun. Just orient north and south and proceed from there; the easiest way to orient yourself. Schikard appears as an elongated crater being, close to the terminator. Under a blue filter, the crater appears to have a distinct central area of different albedo than the edges. The lighter middle part may be a coating from the Oriental impact. The middle part is also interpreted to be older. The darker ends are interpreted to be younger Imbrian basaltic lava flows, placed after the lighter midsection was created by the Oriental impact.. Exact dates are unknown but both are listed as from the Imbrian period of formation. The crater is actually round and larger than Clavius but appears oval due to visual perspective.

Aristarchus is a recent crater of very high albedo which actually lies atop a broad elevated plateau.  At full moon, with the filter, the plateau appears far darker than the surrounding mare lavas. It is interesting that only at full moon can the real differences in albedo be judged accurately. Aristarchus is very bright which is interpreted to be a young crater. Lunar soils darken with exposure and age. Also note that under the full moon, using a filter, the moon is dotted with tiny white very bright white craters. Like salt on a dark paper. Notice, with a few notable exception like Aristarchus and Copernicus, the vast majority of the small bright craters are quite tiny. Some are only dots. It appears that the last major impacts were quite small, the solar system having been swept of larger objects by that time. The Aristarchus Plateau is very distinct and diamond shaped elevated higher than the basin.

Looking at the Imbrian basin south of Sinus Iridium a subtle difference of shading can be detected in what appears a homogeneous Imbrian basin. Look at the eastern tip of Iridium projecting into the Imbrian Basin. Once again, under a blue filter, can you see the difference in albedo as a distinct darker area with a sinuous winding edge. This area has been mapped as two distinct age rock units. The darker is Eratosthenian (younger) than the surrounding Imbrian lavas that make up most of the basin by a pretty fair amount of time. I certainly can see quite a difference in appearance in parts of the Imbrian Basin but this does not show up on the USGS map of the moon as distinct units. Maybe the surface is different being more broken up. It certainly looks different.       


jimcoble2000
 

please send them by. Do they eat a lot?

On Sunday, November 1, 2020, 2:25:24 PM EST, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


I know some Sherpas who might be available.

6 Plus

On Nov 1, 2020, at 2:16 PM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

The only problem with the map is the physical size of the thing (huge). I need two servants like Egyptian scribes to hold it up against the wall.

On Sunday, November 1, 2020, 2:11:07 PM EST, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Good observations Mark – wow, USGS lunar maps!  Just when I think I have everything I could possibly need for driveway astronomy ...

Roy


On Nov 1, 2020, at 7:54 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Actually got in a couple of hours of observing last night and accomplished quite a bit for a full moon night.

Though the full moon is regarded as the least interesting time for lunar observing there are features that can only be seen at this time. Observing the full moon is best done with a light blue filter, 82A. This enhances subtle albedo (brightness) contrasts normally difficult to see on the moon. Several interesting features are visible with patience.

The crater Schickard in the southern hemisphere of the moon lies just west of Tycho. Note that "west" implies being to the  relative left of the north and south poles. This is a bit confusing as tradition reverses east and west when looking at the moon. Telescopic image flips add to the fun. Just orient north and south and proceed from there; the easiest way to orient yourself. Schikard appears as an elongated crater being, close to the terminator. Under a blue filter, the crater appears to have a distinct central area of different albedo than the edges. The lighter middle part may be a coating from the Oriental impact. The middle part is also interpreted to be older. The darker ends are interpreted to be younger Imbrian basaltic lava flows, placed after the lighter midsection was created by the Oriental impact.. Exact dates are unknown but both are listed as from the Imbrian period of formation. The crater is actually round and larger than Clavius but appears oval due to visual perspective.

Aristarchus is a recent crater of very high albedo which actually lies atop a broad elevated plateau.  At full moon, with the filter, the plateau appears far darker than the surrounding mare lavas. It is interesting that only at full moon can the real differences in albedo be judged accurately. Aristarchus is very bright which is interpreted to be a young crater. Lunar soils darken with exposure and age. Also note that under the full moon, using a filter, the moon is dotted with tiny white very bright white craters. Like salt on a dark paper. Notice, with a few notable exception like Aristarchus and Copernicus, the vast majority of the small bright craters are quite tiny. Some are only dots. It appears that the last major impacts were quite small, the solar system having been swept of larger objects by that time. The Aristarchus Plateau is very distinct and diamond shaped elevated higher than the basin.

Looking at the Imbrian basin south of Sinus Iridium a subtle difference of shading can be detected in what appears a homogeneous Imbrian basin. Look at the eastern tip of Iridium projecting into the Imbrian Basin. Once again, under a blue filter, can you see the difference in albedo as a distinct darker area with a sinuous winding edge. This area has been mapped as two distinct age rock units. The darker is Eratosthenian (younger) than the surrounding Imbrian lavas that make up most of the basin by a pretty fair amount of time. I certainly can see quite a difference in appearance in parts of the Imbrian Basin but this does not show up on the USGS map of the moon as distinct units. Maybe the surface is different being more broken up. It certainly looks different.       


jimcoble2000
 

Tough on drywall though!

On Sunday, November 1, 2020, 2:38:18 PM EST, Matthew Cook via groups.io <lt_mrcook@...> wrote:


There's this recent invention you should look into Mark...duct tape.  Wonderful stuff.


On Nov 1, 2020, at 14:16, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

The only problem with the map is the physical size of the thing (huge). I need two servants like Egyptian scribes to hold it up against the wall.

On Sunday, November 1, 2020, 2:11:07 PM EST, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Good observations Mark – wow, USGS lunar maps!  Just when I think I have everything I could possibly need for driveway astronomy ...

Roy


On Nov 1, 2020, at 7:54 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Actually got in a couple of hours of observing last night and accomplished quite a bit for a full moon night.

Though the full moon is regarded as the least interesting time for lunar observing there are features that can only be seen at this time. Observing the full moon is best done with a light blue filter, 82A. This enhances subtle albedo (brightness) contrasts normally difficult to see on the moon. Several interesting features are visible with patience.

The crater Schickard in the southern hemisphere of the moon lies just west of Tycho. Note that "west" implies being to the  relative left of the north and south poles. This is a bit confusing as tradition reverses east and west when looking at the moon. Telescopic image flips add to the fun. Just orient north and south and proceed from there; the easiest way to orient yourself. Schikard appears as an elongated crater being, close to the terminator. Under a blue filter, the crater appears to have a distinct central area of different albedo than the edges. The lighter middle part may be a coating from the Oriental impact. The middle part is also interpreted to be older. The darker ends are interpreted to be younger Imbrian basaltic lava flows, placed after the lighter midsection was created by the Oriental impact.. Exact dates are unknown but both are listed as from the Imbrian period of formation. The crater is actually round and larger than Clavius but appears oval due to visual perspective.

Aristarchus is a recent crater of very high albedo which actually lies atop a broad elevated plateau.  At full moon, with the filter, the plateau appears far darker than the surrounding mare lavas. It is interesting that only at full moon can the real differences in albedo be judged accurately. Aristarchus is very bright which is interpreted to be a young crater. Lunar soils darken with exposure and age. Also note that under the full moon, using a filter, the moon is dotted with tiny white very bright white craters. Like salt on a dark paper. Notice, with a few notable exception like Aristarchus and Copernicus, the vast majority of the small bright craters are quite tiny. Some are only dots. It appears that the last major impacts were quite small, the solar system having been swept of larger objects by that time. The Aristarchus Plateau is very distinct and diamond shaped elevated higher than the basin.

Looking at the Imbrian basin south of Sinus Iridium a subtle difference of shading can be detected in what appears a homogeneous Imbrian basin. Look at the eastern tip of Iridium projecting into the Imbrian Basin. Once again, under a blue filter, can you see the difference in albedo as a distinct darker area with a sinuous winding edge. This area has been mapped as two distinct age rock units. The darker is Eratosthenian (younger) than the surrounding Imbrian lavas that make up most of the basin by a pretty fair amount of time. I certainly can see quite a difference in appearance in parts of the Imbrian Basin but this does not show up on the USGS map of the moon as distinct units. Maybe the surface is different being more broken up. It certainly looks different.