Just wrapped up the solar work for this morning.


jimcoble2000
 

One thing of note. The prom is so big and detailed you might be able to stay at the eyepiece and see change. I hung out for a couple of minutes but the heat is a bit much. I did come back and the prom had changed over five minutes. That is a pretty good observation.  I like the videos astro photographers post but seeing with your own eyes in real time is so much fun cause it is difficult and a rarer observation. Like that flare a couple of months back. There is nothing like seeing it evolve with your own two eyes over a short period or as it happens in real time (a rare visual observation).

Of course only in Ha can real time observing be done to my knowledge. I have never seen a sunspot evolve fast enough in a short time to see the changes. I suspect the prom is moving quickly as I had to dial the scope for the doppler shift.


Kent Blackwell
 

My photographs can't even begin to match what you see with the eye, but I'm a real neophyte at H-alpha photography. Some people's photos are amazing. They show far more than what you can see with the eye but then again, photos of Saturn show more detail than the eye can see. So, what's more exciting, looking at a detailed picture of Saturn or peering at the Ringed Planet in the eyepiece?

On Wed, 3 Aug 2022 14:20:11 +0000 (UTC), Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:
 
One thing of note. The prom is so big and detailed you might be able to stay at the eyepiece and see change. I hung out for a couple of minutes but the heat is a bit much. I did come back and the prom had changed over five minutes. That is a pretty good observation.  I like the videos astro photographers post but seeing with your own eyes in real time is so much fun cause it is difficult and a rarer observation. Like that flare a couple of months back. There is nothing like seeing it evolve with your own two eyes over a short period or as it happens in real time (a rare visual observation).
 
Of course only in Ha can real time observing be done to my knowledge. I have never seen a sunspot evolve fast enough in a short time to see the changes. I suspect the prom is moving quickly as I had to dial the scope for the doppler shift.


jimcoble2000
 

e y e p i e c eEmoji

On Wednesday, August 3, 2022 at 10:29:43 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


My photographs can't even begin to match what you see with the eye, but I'm a real neophyte at H-alpha photography. Some people's photos are amazing. They show far more than what you can see with the eye but then again, photos of Saturn show more detail than the eye can see. So, what's more exciting, looking at a detailed picture of Saturn or peering at the Ringed Planet in the eyepiece?

On Wed, 3 Aug 2022 14:20:11 +0000 (UTC), Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:
 
One thing of note. The prom is so big and detailed you might be able to stay at the eyepiece and see change. I hung out for a couple of minutes but the heat is a bit much. I did come back and the prom had changed over five minutes. That is a pretty good observation.  I like the videos astro photographers post but seeing with your own eyes in real time is so much fun cause it is difficult and a rarer observation. Like that flare a couple of months back. There is nothing like seeing it evolve with your own two eyes over a short period or as it happens in real time (a rare visual observation).
 
Of course only in Ha can real time observing be done to my knowledge. I have never seen a sunspot evolve fast enough in a short time to see the changes. I suspect the prom is moving quickly as I had to dial the scope for the doppler shift.