FW: Night Vision


Ted Forte
 

(This is a message I posted on our group out here in BBAA Southwest, aka Huachuca Astronomy Club, that I thought I’d share here)- Ted

 

 

Many on this list have heard (read) me talking about the PVS-14 night vision monocular. I’ve prepared a short report on the device. Please see the attached.

 

Last night, the building clouds discouraged me from opening the observatory so I just set up my 10-inch Orion Dob in my driveway and used the night vision monocular to tour the sky. I used a 50mm Super Plossl that only gives 24x in the 10-inch but provides a wide 2.2 degree FOV. That finedresque  field coupled with the brightness enhancement of the NV device makes star hopping quite simple. Imagine galaxy-hopping the Virgo-Coma galaxy cluster with the ease of reading a star map or scanning an image. The entirety of Markarian’s Chain can be enjoyed in a single stop!  Galaxies show up quite well in the device, and edge-on galaxies show up particularly well. The device is very red sensitive and galaxies seen edge on are reddened by dust. Globular clusters, composed mostly of old red stars, also show up wonderfully. Even at the tiny (24x) scale, M13, M3, and M5 were magnificent.  

 

Some would say that NV enhancement is “cheating” from a visual observing perspective.  Others are embracing the technology.  What do you think?

 

We Astronomical League observing program coordinators will be meeting virtually to discuss and vote on incorporation of night vision into the observing programs shortly. I anticipate the more militant purists to be incensed.  I’m leaning toward allowing NV for the Planetary Nebula  Program if the League decides to allow it generally.  My goal for the program is just to get people observing planetaries, its irrelevant to me how they do it.  Few PNe will be improved anyway.  OIII emission is not much enhanced.  But some objects will really benefit – I remember being amazed at how the Bug Nebula (NGC 6302) looked in the 30-inch through the device.

 

Ted


Ian Stewart
 

We use filters to enhance viewing, we use bigger apertures and better glass, we use multicoated eyepieces. Image intensifiers are just another way to enjoy our night skies. I'd certainly vote to allow it.

Cheers

Ian

On 5/22/2022 12:22 PM, Ted Forte wrote:

(This is a message I posted on our group out here in BBAA Southwest, aka Huachuca Astronomy Club, that I thought I’d share here)- Ted

 

 

Many on this list have heard (read) me talking about the PVS-14 night vision monocular. I’ve prepared a short report on the device. Please see the attached.

 

Last night, the building clouds discouraged me from opening the observatory so I just set up my 10-inch Orion Dob in my driveway and used the night vision monocular to tour the sky. I used a 50mm Super Plossl that only gives 24x in the 10-inch but provides a wide 2.2 degree FOV. That finedresque  field coupled with the brightness enhancement of the NV device makes star hopping quite simple. Imagine galaxy-hopping the Virgo-Coma galaxy cluster with the ease of reading a star map or scanning an image. The entirety of Markarian’s Chain can be enjoyed in a single stop!  Galaxies show up quite well in the device, and edge-on galaxies show up particularly well. The device is very red sensitive and galaxies seen edge on are reddened by dust. Globular clusters, composed mostly of old red stars, also show up wonderfully. Even at the tiny (24x) scale, M13, M3, and M5 were magnificent.  

 

Some would say that NV enhancement is “cheating” from a visual observing perspective.  Others are embracing the technology.  What do you think?

 

We Astronomical League observing program coordinators will be meeting virtually to discuss and vote on incorporation of night vision into the observing programs shortly. I anticipate the more militant purists to be incensed.  I’m leaning toward allowing NV for the Planetary Nebula  Program if the League decides to allow it generally.  My goal for the program is just to get people observing planetaries, its irrelevant to me how they do it.  Few PNe will be improved anyway.  OIII emission is not much enhanced.  But some objects will really benefit – I remember being amazed at how the Bug Nebula (NGC 6302) looked in the 30-inch through the device.

 

Ted


Jim Tallman
 

I'm for allowing it also, but you have to send me one first :-)

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
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Jim Tallman
 

PM me for address 🙂

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
Get Outlook for Android


bob414
 

Great article! 

 

I have been hooked since John Richmond showed me a pair of PVS-7’s at ECSP.  I purchased a pair of PVS-7s Gen 3’s from a friend who deals with military surplus ~ $1800,  Bino view, green phosphors , with single objective, about 4 years ago.

 

Bought a 1.25 adapter and attached them to my 8” Schmitt, and then a filter wheel with several HA filters.  I am being still impressed.

 

The original 1.25 adapter had a shoulder on the 1.25 tube that restricted insertion into focuser, and could not reach focus on most Dobs, including Kent’s 25”.  I 3D printed one without a shoulder and it did achieve focus on several Dobs.  Did not trust the plastic part holding the expensive NV’s, so I found a metal adapter online without the shoulder and bought it.  That works great on the clubs 18” Classic Obsession and every DOB so far.

 

I also found online an adapter that allows the attachment of Canon DSLR lens to the PVS-7’s, and have attached several lens to the NV’s.  You can also buy the 3X adapter made for the PVS-7 for ~ $350.

 

I designed and 3D printed a soft adapter, that firmly holds a 1.25” filter in front of the PVS-7’s 1x eyepiece, and allows quick and easy changes of filters.

 

Steve Shellman has both the PVS-7 and PVS 14s, and I have enjoyed the views of the PVS-14s thru his 30” Dob.

 

Bob Beuerlein

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ted Forte
Sent: Sunday, May 22, 2022 12:22 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] FW: Night Vision

 

(This is a message I posted on our group out here in BBAA Southwest, aka Huachuca Astronomy Club, that I thought I’d share here)- Ted

 

 

Many on this list have heard (read) me talking about the PVS-14 night vision monocular. I’ve prepared a short report on the device. Please see the attached.

 

Last night, the building clouds discouraged me from opening the observatory so I just set up my 10-inch Orion Dob in my driveway and used the night vision monocular to tour the sky. I used a 50mm Super Plossl that only gives 24x in the 10-inch but provides a wide 2.2 degree FOV. That finedresque  field coupled with the brightness enhancement of the NV device makes star hopping quite simple. Imagine galaxy-hopping the Virgo-Coma galaxy cluster with the ease of reading a star map or scanning an image. The entirety of Markarian’s Chain can be enjoyed in a single stop!  Galaxies show up quite well in the device, and edge-on galaxies show up particularly well. The device is very red sensitive and galaxies seen edge on are reddened by dust. Globular clusters, composed mostly of old red stars, also show up wonderfully. Even at the tiny (24x) scale, M13, M3, and M5 were magnificent.  

 

Some would say that NV enhancement is “cheating” from a visual observing perspective.  Others are embracing the technology.  What do you think?

 

We Astronomical League observing program coordinators will be meeting virtually to discuss and vote on incorporation of night vision into the observing programs shortly. I anticipate the more militant purists to be incensed.  I’m leaning toward allowing NV for the Planetary Nebula  Program if the League decides to allow it generally.  My goal for the program is just to get people observing planetaries, its irrelevant to me how they do it.  Few PNe will be improved anyway.  OIII emission is not much enhanced.  But some objects will really benefit – I remember being amazed at how the Bug Nebula (NGC 6302) looked in the 30-inch through the device.

 

Ted


Ted Forte
 

I remember seeing (and seeing through) John Raymond’s night vision device.  Quite possibly at that same ECSP (?) .  I’ll take your word for it being a PVS-7. It was novel, but I didn’t like the green tint or the speculation as I recall.  I also saw another one at a DelMarVa Stargaze – I forget who had one. 

 

They left me with the impression that NV wasn’t anything I was interested in spending money on. The white phosphor model changed my mind in an instant.

 

I’ve used it in the 30-inch, the 18-inch and in the 10-inch Dobs and tried it with the 20-inch RC at our Patterson Observatory. It’s wonderful in the bigger apertures of course, but the wide fields possible in the 10 are just incredible (with the 65mm Super Plossl it yields 2.8 degrees). The view of IC 434, the Horse Head and NGC 2022, all in a single field of view, just knocks my socks off.  It rivals any photograph I’ve seen of the area!

 

Omega Centauri in the 30-inch, enhanced with the NV literally takes my breath away every time I look at it.

 

What I find most exciting though, is the nebulous stuff that doesn’t even appear in the charts and apparently has no designations, the winter Milky Way is particularly rich in unmarked areas, but there is a lot more than the charts imply in the summer Milky Way too.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of bob414
Sent: Sunday, May 22, 2022 11:56 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] FW: Night Vision

 

Great article! 

 

I have been hooked since John Richmond showed me a pair of PVS-7’s at ECSP.  I purchased a pair of PVS-7s Gen 3’s from a friend who deals with military surplus ~ $1800,  Bino view, green phosphors , with single objective, about 4 years ago.

 

Bought a 1.25 adapter and attached them to my 8” Schmitt, and then a filter wheel with several HA filters.  I am being still impressed.

 

The original 1.25 adapter had a shoulder on the 1.25 tube that restricted insertion into focuser, and could not reach focus on most Dobs, including Kent’s 25”.  I 3D printed one without a shoulder and it did achieve focus on several Dobs.  Did not trust the plastic part holding the expensive NV’s, so I found a metal adapter online without the shoulder and bought it.  That works great on the clubs 18” Classic Obsession and every DOB so far.

 

I also found online an adapter that allows the attachment of Canon DSLR lens to the PVS-7’s, and have attached several lens to the NV’s.  You can also buy the 3X adapter made for the PVS-7 for ~ $350.

 

I designed and 3D printed a soft adapter, that firmly holds a 1.25” filter in front of the PVS-7’s 1x eyepiece, and allows quick and easy changes of filters.

 

Steve Shellman has both the PVS-7 and PVS 14s, and I have enjoyed the views of the PVS-14s thru his 30” Dob.

 

Bob Beuerlein

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ted Forte
Sent: Sunday, May 22, 2022 12:22 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] FW: Night Vision

 

(This is a message I posted on our group out here in BBAA Southwest, aka Huachuca Astronomy Club, that I thought I’d share here)- Ted

 

 

Many on this list have heard (read) me talking about the PVS-14 night vision monocular. I’ve prepared a short report on the device. Please see the attached.

 

Last night, the building clouds discouraged me from opening the observatory so I just set up my 10-inch Orion Dob in my driveway and used the night vision monocular to tour the sky. I used a 50mm Super Plossl that only gives 24x in the 10-inch but provides a wide 2.2 degree FOV. That finedresque  field coupled with the brightness enhancement of the NV device makes star hopping quite simple. Imagine galaxy-hopping the Virgo-Coma galaxy cluster with the ease of reading a star map or scanning an image. The entirety of Markarian’s Chain can be enjoyed in a single stop!  Galaxies show up quite well in the device, and edge-on galaxies show up particularly well. The device is very red sensitive and galaxies seen edge on are reddened by dust. Globular clusters, composed mostly of old red stars, also show up wonderfully. Even at the tiny (24x) scale, M13, M3, and M5 were magnificent.  

 

Some would say that NV enhancement is “cheating” from a visual observing perspective.  Others are embracing the technology.  What do you think?

 

We Astronomical League observing program coordinators will be meeting virtually to discuss and vote on incorporation of night vision into the observing programs shortly. I anticipate the more militant purists to be incensed.  I’m leaning toward allowing NV for the Planetary Nebula  Program if the League decides to allow it generally.  My goal for the program is just to get people observing planetaries, its irrelevant to me how they do it.  Few PNe will be improved anyway.  OIII emission is not much enhanced.  But some objects will really benefit – I remember being amazed at how the Bug Nebula (NGC 6302) looked in the 30-inch through the device.

 

Ted


George Reynolds
 

On Sunday, May 22, 2022, 12:22:29 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


(This is a message I posted on our group out here in BBAA Southwest, aka Huachuca Astronomy Club, that I thought I’d share here)- Ted

 

 

Many on this list have heard (read) me talking about the PVS-14 night vision monocular. I’ve prepared a short report on the device. Please see the attached.

 

Last night, the building clouds discouraged me from opening the observatory so I just set up my 10-inch Orion Dob in my driveway and used the night vision monocular to tour the sky. I used a 50mm Super Plossl that only gives 24x in the 10-inch but provides a wide 2.2 degree FOV. That finedresque  field coupled with the brightness enhancement of the NV device makes star hopping quite simple. Imagine galaxy-hopping the Virgo-Coma galaxy cluster with the ease of reading a star map or scanning an image. The entirety of Markarian’s Chain can be enjoyed in a single stop!  Galaxies show up quite well in the device, and edge-on galaxies show up particularly well. The device is very red sensitive and galaxies seen edge on are reddened by dust. Globular clusters, composed mostly of old red stars, also show up wonderfully. Even at the tiny (24x) scale, M13, M3, and M5 were magnificent.  

 

Some would say that NV enhancement is “cheating” from a visual observing perspective.  Others are embracing the technology.  What do you think?

 

We Astronomical League observing program coordinators will be meeting virtually to discuss and vote on incorporation of night vision into the observing programs shortly. I anticipate the more militant purists to be incensed.  I’m leaning toward allowing NV for the Planetary Nebula  Program if the League decides to allow it generally.  My goal for the program is just to get people observing planetaries, its irrelevant to me how they do it.  Few PNe will be improved anyway.  OIII emission is not much enhanced.  But some objects will really benefit – I remember being amazed at how the Bug Nebula (NGC 6302) looked in the 30-inch through the device.

 

Ted


jimcoble2000
 

easier to just go on line and get a picture

On Sunday, May 22, 2022, 10:50:15 PM EDT, George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...> wrote:


On Sunday, May 22, 2022, 12:22:29 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


(This is a message I posted on our group out here in BBAA Southwest, aka Huachuca Astronomy Club, that I thought I’d share here)- Ted

 

 

Many on this list have heard (read) me talking about the PVS-14 night vision monocular. I’ve prepared a short report on the device. Please see the attached.

 

Last night, the building clouds discouraged me from opening the observatory so I just set up my 10-inch Orion Dob in my driveway and used the night vision monocular to tour the sky. I used a 50mm Super Plossl that only gives 24x in the 10-inch but provides a wide 2.2 degree FOV. That finedresque  field coupled with the brightness enhancement of the NV device makes star hopping quite simple. Imagine galaxy-hopping the Virgo-Coma galaxy cluster with the ease of reading a star map or scanning an image. The entirety of Markarian’s Chain can be enjoyed in a single stop!  Galaxies show up quite well in the device, and edge-on galaxies show up particularly well. The device is very red sensitive and galaxies seen edge on are reddened by dust. Globular clusters, composed mostly of old red stars, also show up wonderfully. Even at the tiny (24x) scale, M13, M3, and M5 were magnificent.  

 

Some would say that NV enhancement is “cheating” from a visual observing perspective.  Others are embracing the technology.  What do you think?

 

We Astronomical League observing program coordinators will be meeting virtually to discuss and vote on incorporation of night vision into the observing programs shortly. I anticipate the more militant purists to be incensed.  I’m leaning toward allowing NV for the Planetary Nebula  Program if the League decides to allow it generally.  My goal for the program is just to get people observing planetaries, its irrelevant to me how they do it.  Few PNe will be improved anyway.  OIII emission is not much enhanced.  But some objects will really benefit – I remember being amazed at how the Bug Nebula (NGC 6302) looked in the 30-inch through the device.

 

Ted


preciousmyprecious
 

I am smellin, what you stepped in, Mark

Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean


On Tuesday, May 24, 2022, 11:14:01 AM EDT, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


easier to just go on line and get a picture

On Sunday, May 22, 2022, 10:50:15 PM EDT, George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...> wrote:


On Sunday, May 22, 2022, 12:22:29 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


(This is a message I posted on our group out here in BBAA Southwest, aka Huachuca Astronomy Club, that I thought I’d share here)- Ted

 

 

Many on this list have heard (read) me talking about the PVS-14 night vision monocular. I’ve prepared a short report on the device. Please see the attached.

 

Last night, the building clouds discouraged me from opening the observatory so I just set up my 10-inch Orion Dob in my driveway and used the night vision monocular to tour the sky. I used a 50mm Super Plossl that only gives 24x in the 10-inch but provides a wide 2.2 degree FOV. That finedresque  field coupled with the brightness enhancement of the NV device makes star hopping quite simple. Imagine galaxy-hopping the Virgo-Coma galaxy cluster with the ease of reading a star map or scanning an image. The entirety of Markarian’s Chain can be enjoyed in a single stop!  Galaxies show up quite well in the device, and edge-on galaxies show up particularly well. The device is very red sensitive and galaxies seen edge on are reddened by dust. Globular clusters, composed mostly of old red stars, also show up wonderfully. Even at the tiny (24x) scale, M13, M3, and M5 were magnificent.  

 

Some would say that NV enhancement is “cheating” from a visual observing perspective.  Others are embracing the technology.  What do you think?

 

We Astronomical League observing program coordinators will be meeting virtually to discuss and vote on incorporation of night vision into the observing programs shortly. I anticipate the more militant purists to be incensed.  I’m leaning toward allowing NV for the Planetary Nebula  Program if the League decides to allow it generally.  My goal for the program is just to get people observing planetaries, its irrelevant to me how they do it.  Few PNe will be improved anyway.  OIII emission is not much enhanced.  But some objects will really benefit – I remember being amazed at how the Bug Nebula (NGC 6302) looked in the 30-inch through the device.

 

Ted


jimcoble2000
 

it is only electrons.

On Tuesday, May 24, 2022, 12:09:48 PM EDT, preciousmyprecious via groups.io <preciousmyprecious@...> wrote:


I am smellin, what you stepped in, Mark

Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean


On Tuesday, May 24, 2022, 11:14:01 AM EDT, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


easier to just go on line and get a picture

On Sunday, May 22, 2022, 10:50:15 PM EDT, George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...> wrote:


On Sunday, May 22, 2022, 12:22:29 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


(This is a message I posted on our group out here in BBAA Southwest, aka Huachuca Astronomy Club, that I thought I’d share here)- Ted

 

 

Many on this list have heard (read) me talking about the PVS-14 night vision monocular. I’ve prepared a short report on the device. Please see the attached.

 

Last night, the building clouds discouraged me from opening the observatory so I just set up my 10-inch Orion Dob in my driveway and used the night vision monocular to tour the sky. I used a 50mm Super Plossl that only gives 24x in the 10-inch but provides a wide 2.2 degree FOV. That finedresque  field coupled with the brightness enhancement of the NV device makes star hopping quite simple. Imagine galaxy-hopping the Virgo-Coma galaxy cluster with the ease of reading a star map or scanning an image. The entirety of Markarian’s Chain can be enjoyed in a single stop!  Galaxies show up quite well in the device, and edge-on galaxies show up particularly well. The device is very red sensitive and galaxies seen edge on are reddened by dust. Globular clusters, composed mostly of old red stars, also show up wonderfully. Even at the tiny (24x) scale, M13, M3, and M5 were magnificent.  

 

Some would say that NV enhancement is “cheating” from a visual observing perspective.  Others are embracing the technology.  What do you think?

 

We Astronomical League observing program coordinators will be meeting virtually to discuss and vote on incorporation of night vision into the observing programs shortly. I anticipate the more militant purists to be incensed.  I’m leaning toward allowing NV for the Planetary Nebula  Program if the League decides to allow it generally.  My goal for the program is just to get people observing planetaries, its irrelevant to me how they do it.  Few PNe will be improved anyway.  OIII emission is not much enhanced.  But some objects will really benefit – I remember being amazed at how the Bug Nebula (NGC 6302) looked in the 30-inch through the device.

 

Ted


jimcoble2000
 

Anyway Bill, they don't sign my paycheck! That's the important part.Emoji

On Tuesday, May 24, 2022, 12:09:48 PM EDT, preciousmyprecious via groups.io <preciousmyprecious@...> wrote:


I am smellin, what you stepped in, Mark

Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean


On Tuesday, May 24, 2022, 11:14:01 AM EDT, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


easier to just go on line and get a picture

On Sunday, May 22, 2022, 10:50:15 PM EDT, George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...> wrote:


On Sunday, May 22, 2022, 12:22:29 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


(This is a message I posted on our group out here in BBAA Southwest, aka Huachuca Astronomy Club, that I thought I’d share here)- Ted

 

 

Many on this list have heard (read) me talking about the PVS-14 night vision monocular. I’ve prepared a short report on the device. Please see the attached.

 

Last night, the building clouds discouraged me from opening the observatory so I just set up my 10-inch Orion Dob in my driveway and used the night vision monocular to tour the sky. I used a 50mm Super Plossl that only gives 24x in the 10-inch but provides a wide 2.2 degree FOV. That finedresque  field coupled with the brightness enhancement of the NV device makes star hopping quite simple. Imagine galaxy-hopping the Virgo-Coma galaxy cluster with the ease of reading a star map or scanning an image. The entirety of Markarian’s Chain can be enjoyed in a single stop!  Galaxies show up quite well in the device, and edge-on galaxies show up particularly well. The device is very red sensitive and galaxies seen edge on are reddened by dust. Globular clusters, composed mostly of old red stars, also show up wonderfully. Even at the tiny (24x) scale, M13, M3, and M5 were magnificent.  

 

Some would say that NV enhancement is “cheating” from a visual observing perspective.  Others are embracing the technology.  What do you think?

 

We Astronomical League observing program coordinators will be meeting virtually to discuss and vote on incorporation of night vision into the observing programs shortly. I anticipate the more militant purists to be incensed.  I’m leaning toward allowing NV for the Planetary Nebula  Program if the League decides to allow it generally.  My goal for the program is just to get people observing planetaries, its irrelevant to me how they do it.  Few PNe will be improved anyway.  OIII emission is not much enhanced.  But some objects will really benefit – I remember being amazed at how the Bug Nebula (NGC 6302) looked in the 30-inch through the device.

 

Ted


bob414
 

I know they are cheaper by the dozen, but I only needed one.  Plus technologies are a changing.  Anything you can uses is out of date!

 

Bob

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2022 12:12 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] FW: Night Vision

 

it is only electrons.

 

On Tuesday, May 24, 2022, 12:09:48 PM EDT, preciousmyprecious via groups.io <preciousmyprecious@...> wrote:

 

 

I am smellin, what you stepped in, Mark

 

Carpe Noctem

Bill McLean

 

 

On Tuesday, May 24, 2022, 11:14:01 AM EDT, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

 

 

easier to just go on line and get a picture

 

On Sunday, May 22, 2022, 10:50:15 PM EDT, George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...> wrote:

 

 

On Sunday, May 22, 2022, 12:22:29 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:

 

 

(This is a message I posted on our group out here in BBAA Southwest, aka Huachuca Astronomy Club, that I thought I’d share here)- Ted

 

 

Many on this list have heard (read) me talking about the PVS-14 night vision monocular. I’ve prepared a short report on the device. Please see the attached.

 

Last night, the building clouds discouraged me from opening the observatory so I just set up my 10-inch Orion Dob in my driveway and used the night vision monocular to tour the sky. I used a 50mm Super Plossl that only gives 24x in the 10-inch but provides a wide 2.2 degree FOV. That finedresque  field coupled with the brightness enhancement of the NV device makes star hopping quite simple. Imagine galaxy-hopping the Virgo-Coma galaxy cluster with the ease of reading a star map or scanning an image. The entirety of Markarian’s Chain can be enjoyed in a single stop!  Galaxies show up quite well in the device, and edge-on galaxies show up particularly well. The device is very red sensitive and galaxies seen edge on are reddened by dust. Globular clusters, composed mostly of old red stars, also show up wonderfully. Even at the tiny (24x) scale, M13, M3, and M5 were magnificent.  

 

Some would say that NV enhancement is “cheating” from a visual observing perspective.  Others are embracing the technology.  What do you think?

 

We Astronomical League observing program coordinators will be meeting virtually to discuss and vote on incorporation of night vision into the observing programs shortly. I anticipate the more militant purists to be incensed.  I’m leaning toward allowing NV for the Planetary Nebula  Program if the League decides to allow it generally.  My goal for the program is just to get people observing planetaries, its irrelevant to me how they do it.  Few PNe will be improved anyway.  OIII emission is not much enhanced.  But some objects will really benefit – I remember being amazed at how the Bug Nebula (NGC 6302) looked in the 30-inch through the device.

 

Ted