Fw: Last night observing


jimcoble2000
 



----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>

To: Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...>; kent@... <kent@...>
Cc: Roy Diffrient <mail@...>
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2022 at 10:40:51 AM EDT
Subject: Re: Last night observing

That's a pretty good method. Yes the thin wall of the tube can be a bit of problem getting the cell back in though not a major one. I have a secret...............................there are two Dawn formulas that act totally different!

A lot of the old advise for using dawn to clean birds and telescopic mirrors was written years ago when it was a different formula that the current issue of Dawn. I had heard from an old sea captain that if you had an oil spill you first put Dawn in the water and that drew the slick together. I doubted that so I did a bench test in a bucket and the Dawn just spread the mess out making it worse.

I found a source of the old Dawn detergent and lo and behold he was correct. There is a difference. It can be had at amazon for a bit of cost. Might be worth buying a couple to use for those mirror cleanings. The key word is "non concentrate". The stuff you now buy at the store (concentrated) is not as good for this.






On Sunday, July 24, 2022 at 11:26:24 AM EDT, kent@... <kent@...> wrote:


I’ll gladly help clean the mirror if you need help. It’s a real bitch to get the cell back in the thin-walled Orion steel tube. Other than that, it’s pretty easy. Once out of the mirror cell, I run distilled water  over the mirror. While the water is running. I use a drop of Dawn detergent and swirl it around with the palm of my hand.

 

Then I rinse with distilled water, and rinse again. After all soap is removed I lay the mirror face up on a table and use a trick Roy taught me decades ago. I lay several layers of Bounty paper towels over the surface and TAP it dry. Never, ever rub the surface.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Kathlene Wright
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 11:19 AM
To: Kent Blackwell; Mark Ost
Cc: Roy Diffrient
Subject: Re: Last night observing

 

Yep, I can bring my 80mm one evening this week or next.  I'll just skip swimming the next morning. 

My 10" hasn't been spot on when navigating..... I've been having to do a little searching for my targets.  I find them, but with some effort.  Then it dawned on me, my finder scope is out of kilter.  It needs to be resynced with the telescope.  So now it's time to do some maintenance.  I need to install a new o-ring on the finder scope OTA anyway. 

And, I'll clean the mirror.  I'm going to get a couple of gallons of demineralized water.... we have well water.  Not good for optics.  I'm going to remove the whole mirror assembly.  I'll mark the screw hole orientation with a piece of painter's tape.  I'll check the collimation after reinstallation.  Should be good to go for another year.  It's a really nice telescope.

My sister and niece were in Williamsburg yesterday, so we went to visit them.  Got home around 11 last night.  Too late to start a star gazing session, so we hit the rack.       

On July 23, 2022 at 8:32 AM Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Yes, we had a good evening. I compared Mark's Takahashi 3.3mm TOE to my 3.4mm Vixen HR eyepiece and the Takahashi has a slightly larger field at 50° as opposed to 42° but as far as  sharpness goes I saw no difference. The Vixen is disconnected, too bad. I bought the whole set when they came out. Thanks Barry Ferrell for telling me about them years ago. Has he ever used his? Of course not!

 

Barry took delivery of a new Celestron 10" Dobsonian with plate solving Star Sense but he hasn't opened the box yet. No surprise there.

 

David, you should bring over your 80mm one night and join us for double star observing.

 

Kent


On Jul 23, 2022, at 8:22 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Well we had a pretty good session. Most of the night was fairly clear with passing clouds that finally built up to a full blanket around 2330 (1130 pm for recidivists).

 

We has a smorgasbord of objects last night, doubles, opens, planetaries. oh my. 

 

Kent and I saw a couple of nice doubles then we wandered over to Ophiucus to look at a bright planetary. At 600 something power it appeared to be very elongated like a...........how you say in these country... football. We could also make out an outer envelope but no central star. We observed it in the 6 inch and the 5 inch. Who says a 1.6mm eyepiece cannot be used? You just need tracking.

 

Kent started to look at open clusters. This is odd as normally they are not the prime dish on his menu. We looked at M-11. I looked at it in quite a few powers and frankly this object, really in many ways, is much better at low power where it just shines. I have noticed that globulars and tight star clusters take on a distinct shiny appearance at low powers. I call this viewing in context. It really is the nicest way to appreciate the beauty of these objects. That shine effect tends to disappear with more power and close examination. Kent found a 0.9 double that was fun to do in his 6. I found a 1.8 with a three magnitude difference. I was going to shoot at a 12.7 magnitude star but somehow the clouds had moved in by 1130 and put an end to that show. 

 

Roy I hope you get lots of opens with your new scope.

 

We discussed my budget and all the things Kent and Roy have generously ordered for me. With that big reflector on the list we are well north of 1 million dollars now COD. I just want to thank you all for your support. I could not have achieved this milestone without you help.

 

In short "I owe you"

 

This has been one very long hot spell. I think we were very lucky to have had a couple of good decades in excellent conditions for observing. I make no predictions for the future.

 

As a closing remark, have you noticed that the smaller pair of the double double is distinctly of a different color?

 

 


 

 


Patrick Vartuli
 

I would be interested in learning the secrets of cleaning the mirror and possibly an eyepiece.  I can bring the Dawn.  Thanks for the link Mark.


On Mon, Jul 25, 2022, 10:42 AM jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>
To: Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...>; kent@... <kent@...>
Cc: Roy Diffrient <mail@...>
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2022 at 10:40:51 AM EDT
Subject: Re: Last night observing

That's a pretty good method. Yes the thin wall of the tube can be a bit of problem getting the cell back in though not a major one. I have a secret...............................there are two Dawn formulas that act totally different!

A lot of the old advise for using dawn to clean birds and telescopic mirrors was written years ago when it was a different formula that the current issue of Dawn. I had heard from an old sea captain that if you had an oil spill you first put Dawn in the water and that drew the slick together. I doubted that so I did a bench test in a bucket and the Dawn just spread the mess out making it worse.

I found a source of the old Dawn detergent and lo and behold he was correct. There is a difference. It can be had at amazon for a bit of cost. Might be worth buying a couple to use for those mirror cleanings. The key word is "non concentrate". The stuff you now buy at the store (concentrated) is not as good for this.






On Sunday, July 24, 2022 at 11:26:24 AM EDT, kent@... <kent@...> wrote:


I’ll gladly help clean the mirror if you need help. It’s a real bitch to get the cell back in the thin-walled Orion steel tube. Other than that, it’s pretty easy. Once out of the mirror cell, I run distilled water  over the mirror. While the water is running. I use a drop of Dawn detergent and swirl it around with the palm of my hand.

 

Then I rinse with distilled water, and rinse again. After all soap is removed I lay the mirror face up on a table and use a trick Roy taught me decades ago. I lay several layers of Bounty paper towels over the surface and TAP it dry. Never, ever rub the surface.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Kathlene Wright
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 11:19 AM
To: Kent Blackwell; Mark Ost
Cc: Roy Diffrient
Subject: Re: Last night observing

 

Yep, I can bring my 80mm one evening this week or next.  I'll just skip swimming the next morning. 

My 10" hasn't been spot on when navigating..... I've been having to do a little searching for my targets.  I find them, but with some effort.  Then it dawned on me, my finder scope is out of kilter.  It needs to be resynced with the telescope.  So now it's time to do some maintenance.  I need to install a new o-ring on the finder scope OTA anyway. 

And, I'll clean the mirror.  I'm going to get a couple of gallons of demineralized water.... we have well water.  Not good for optics.  I'm going to remove the whole mirror assembly.  I'll mark the screw hole orientation with a piece of painter's tape.  I'll check the collimation after reinstallation.  Should be good to go for another year.  It's a really nice telescope.

My sister and niece were in Williamsburg yesterday, so we went to visit them.  Got home around 11 last night.  Too late to start a star gazing session, so we hit the rack.       

On July 23, 2022 at 8:32 AM Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Yes, we had a good evening. I compared Mark's Takahashi 3.3mm TOE to my 3.4mm Vixen HR eyepiece and the Takahashi has a slightly larger field at 50° as opposed to 42° but as far as  sharpness goes I saw no difference. The Vixen is disconnected, too bad. I bought the whole set when they came out. Thanks Barry Ferrell for telling me about them years ago. Has he ever used his? Of course not!

 

Barry took delivery of a new Celestron 10" Dobsonian with plate solving Star Sense but he hasn't opened the box yet. No surprise there.

 

David, you should bring over your 80mm one night and join us for double star observing.

 

Kent


On Jul 23, 2022, at 8:22 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Well we had a pretty good session. Most of the night was fairly clear with passing clouds that finally built up to a full blanket around 2330 (1130 pm for recidivists).

 

We has a smorgasbord of objects last night, doubles, opens, planetaries. oh my. 

 

Kent and I saw a couple of nice doubles then we wandered over to Ophiucus to look at a bright planetary. At 600 something power it appeared to be very elongated like a...........how you say in these country... football. We could also make out an outer envelope but no central star. We observed it in the 6 inch and the 5 inch. Who says a 1.6mm eyepiece cannot be used? You just need tracking.

 

Kent started to look at open clusters. This is odd as normally they are not the prime dish on his menu. We looked at M-11. I looked at it in quite a few powers and frankly this object, really in many ways, is much better at low power where it just shines. I have noticed that globulars and tight star clusters take on a distinct shiny appearance at low powers. I call this viewing in context. It really is the nicest way to appreciate the beauty of these objects. That shine effect tends to disappear with more power and close examination. Kent found a 0.9 double that was fun to do in his 6. I found a 1.8 with a three magnitude difference. I was going to shoot at a 12.7 magnitude star but somehow the clouds had moved in by 1130 and put an end to that show. 

 

Roy I hope you get lots of opens with your new scope.

 

We discussed my budget and all the things Kent and Roy have generously ordered for me. With that big reflector on the list we are well north of 1 million dollars now COD. I just want to thank you all for your support. I could not have achieved this milestone without you help.

 

In short "I owe you"

 

This has been one very long hot spell. I think we were very lucky to have had a couple of good decades in excellent conditions for observing. I make no predictions for the future.

 

As a closing remark, have you noticed that the smaller pair of the double double is distinctly of a different color?

 

 


 

 


Ted Forte
 

Everyone has their own method. I never use soap anymore, just distilled water. I do use the paper towel trick to dry the mirror – along with sterile cotton.

 

For small mirrors that I can pick up and bring to a sink, I first just wash it under the faucet – then rinse copiously with distilled water. Seems to work just fine.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2022 7:43 AM
To: BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Fw: Last night observing

 

 

 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>

To: Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...>; kent@... <kent@...>

Cc: Roy Diffrient <mail@...>

Sent: Monday, July 25, 2022 at 10:40:51 AM EDT

Subject: Re: Last night observing

 

That's a pretty good method. Yes the thin wall of the tube can be a bit of problem getting the cell back in though not a major one. I have a secret...............................there are two Dawn formulas that act totally different!

 

A lot of the old advise for using dawn to clean birds and telescopic mirrors was written years ago when it was a different formula that the current issue of Dawn. I had heard from an old sea captain that if you had an oil spill you first put Dawn in the water and that drew the slick together. I doubted that so I did a bench test in a bucket and the Dawn just spread the mess out making it worse.

 

I found a source of the old Dawn detergent and lo and behold he was correct. There is a difference. It can be had at amazon for a bit of cost. Might be worth buying a couple to use for those mirror cleanings. The key word is "non concentrate". The stuff you now buy at the store (concentrated) is not as good for this.

 

 

Dawn Non Concentrated Original Dishwashing Liquid, 12.6 Fluid Ounce 3 pe...

Dawn Non Concentrated Original Dishwashing Liquid, 12.6 Fluid Ounce pack of 3 bottles

 

 

 

 

On Sunday, July 24, 2022 at 11:26:24 AM EDT, kent@... <kent@...> wrote:

 

 

I’ll gladly help clean the mirror if you need help. It’s a real bitch to get the cell back in the thin-walled Orion steel tube. Other than that, it’s pretty easy. Once out of the mirror cell, I run distilled water  over the mirror. While the water is running. I use a drop of Dawn detergent and swirl it around with the palm of my hand.

 

Then I rinse with distilled water, and rinse again. After all soap is removed I lay the mirror face up on a table and use a trick Roy taught me decades ago. I lay several layers of Bounty paper towels over the surface and TAP it dry. Never, ever rub the surface.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Kathlene Wright
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 11:19 AM
To: Kent Blackwell; Mark Ost
Cc: Roy Diffrient
Subject: Re: Last night observing

 

Yep, I can bring my 80mm one evening this week or next.  I'll just skip swimming the next morning. 

My 10" hasn't been spot on when navigating..... I've been having to do a little searching for my targets.  I find them, but with some effort.  Then it dawned on me, my finder scope is out of kilter.  It needs to be resynced with the telescope.  So now it's time to do some maintenance.  I need to install a new o-ring on the finder scope OTA anyway. 

And, I'll clean the mirror.  I'm going to get a couple of gallons of demineralized water.... we have well water.  Not good for optics.  I'm going to remove the whole mirror assembly.  I'll mark the screw hole orientation with a piece of painter's tape.  I'll check the collimation after reinstallation.  Should be good to go for another year.  It's a really nice telescope.

My sister and niece were in Williamsburg yesterday, so we went to visit them.  Got home around 11 last night.  Too late to start a star gazing session, so we hit the rack.       

On July 23, 2022 at 8:32 AM Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Yes, we had a good evening. I compared Mark's Takahashi 3.3mm TOE to my 3.4mm Vixen HR eyepiece and the Takahashi has a slightly larger field at 50° as opposed to 42° but as far as  sharpness goes I saw no difference. The Vixen is disconnected, too bad. I bought the whole set when they came out. Thanks Barry Ferrell for telling me about them years ago. Has he ever used his? Of course not!

 

Barry took delivery of a new Celestron 10" Dobsonian with plate solving Star Sense but he hasn't opened the box yet. No surprise there.

 

David, you should bring over your 80mm one night and join us for double star observing.

 

Kent


On Jul 23, 2022, at 8:22 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Well we had a pretty good session. Most of the night was fairly clear with passing clouds that finally built up to a full blanket around 2330 (1130 pm for recidivists).

 

We has a smorgasbord of objects last night, doubles, opens, planetaries. oh my. 

 

Kent and I saw a couple of nice doubles then we wandered over to Ophiucus to look at a bright planetary. At 600 something power it appeared to be very elongated like a...........how you say in these country... football. We could also make out an outer envelope but no central star. We observed it in the 6 inch and the 5 inch. Who says a 1.6mm eyepiece cannot be used? You just need tracking.

 

Kent started to look at open clusters. This is odd as normally they are not the prime dish on his menu. We looked at M-11. I looked at it in quite a few powers and frankly this object, really in many ways, is much better at low power where it just shines. I have noticed that globulars and tight star clusters take on a distinct shiny appearance at low powers. I call this viewing in context. It really is the nicest way to appreciate the beauty of these objects. That shine effect tends to disappear with more power and close examination. Kent found a 0.9 double that was fun to do in his 6. I found a 1.8 with a three magnitude difference. I was going to shoot at a 12.7 magnitude star but somehow the clouds had moved in by 1130 and put an end to that show. 

 

Roy I hope you get lots of opens with your new scope.

 

We discussed my budget and all the things Kent and Roy have generously ordered for me. With that big reflector on the list we are well north of 1 million dollars now COD. I just want to thank you all for your support. I could not have achieved this milestone without you help.

 

In short "I owe you"

 

This has been one very long hot spell. I think we were very lucky to have had a couple of good decades in excellent conditions for observing. I make no predictions for the future.

 

As a closing remark, have you noticed that the smaller pair of the double double is distinctly of a different color?

 

 


 

 


preciousmyprecious
 

Never clean it. Unless a bird pooped on it or someone spilled a Mars tini on it. I have compared George's 10inch which has the dust of Nebuchadnezzar on it with my clean 10inch and  could see no difference dim or bright object. Run the comparison yourself. I doubt George has cleaned it yet.  

Carpe Noctum
Bill McLean


jimcoble2000
 

Sure. Actually there are two separate techniques for eyepieces and mirrors. Now I am not the be all and end all of how to do it so this is just my experience.

Eyepieces: My favorite method is using a product from Edmond Optics called Tech Spec.This is a professional optics cleaning liquid. Comes in a spray bottle. It is expensive but you don't need much so it lasts for a long time. I have two bottles that have gone for over three years. I use this with a lens cleaning cloth. I spray the Tech Spec on the cloth and not the lens. You don't want to get fluid between elements. I fold the cloth and gently wipe the face of the optics. If there is any dust or dirt gently brush off with a camera brush before using the cloth. Celestron makes a nice cleaning pen/brush that does a good job of this. (Don't use canned air. If the propellant gets out it can damage the coatings) If you have a bad oil spot that the Tech Spec cannot get at you can use charcoal lighter fluid like you buy in the store for cook outs. This is food grade and will remove the hardest stuff without damaging the coatings. Takahashi recommends this for bad spots that resist anything else.


Mirrors: This is where the Dawn comes in. Clean the mirror of dust or solid particles. Use a mixture of dawn/distilled water. Some throw alchohol into the mix. There are several way to mix this.gently wash the mirror and rinse with distilled water and allow to dry by placing paper towels on the mirror. Don't rub the mirror with the towels paper is very abrasive. It can damage the coatings or worse the reflective surface. Roy may have more to say about this. Usually clean the mirror outside the scope.

Best philosophy. Keep it clean and clean it only at a minimum. Never look at it at night with your red flashlight that way lies madness!

On Monday, July 25, 2022 at 08:43:01 PM EDT, Patrick Vartuli <pvartuli@...> wrote:


I would be interested in learning the secrets of cleaning the mirror and possibly an eyepiece.  I can bring the Dawn.  Thanks for the link Mark.


On Mon, Jul 25, 2022, 10:42 AM jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>
To: Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...>; kent@... <kent@...>
Cc: Roy Diffrient <mail@...>
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2022 at 10:40:51 AM EDT
Subject: Re: Last night observing

That's a pretty good method. Yes the thin wall of the tube can be a bit of problem getting the cell back in though not a major one. I have a secret...............................there are two Dawn formulas that act totally different!

A lot of the old advise for using dawn to clean birds and telescopic mirrors was written years ago when it was a different formula that the current issue of Dawn. I had heard from an old sea captain that if you had an oil spill you first put Dawn in the water and that drew the slick together. I doubted that so I did a bench test in a bucket and the Dawn just spread the mess out making it worse.

I found a source of the old Dawn detergent and lo and behold he was correct. There is a difference. It can be had at amazon for a bit of cost. Might be worth buying a couple to use for those mirror cleanings. The key word is "non concentrate". The stuff you now buy at the store (concentrated) is not as good for this.






On Sunday, July 24, 2022 at 11:26:24 AM EDT, kent@... <kent@...> wrote:


I’ll gladly help clean the mirror if you need help. It’s a real bitch to get the cell back in the thin-walled Orion steel tube. Other than that, it’s pretty easy. Once out of the mirror cell, I run distilled water  over the mirror. While the water is running. I use a drop of Dawn detergent and swirl it around with the palm of my hand.

 

Then I rinse with distilled water, and rinse again. After all soap is removed I lay the mirror face up on a table and use a trick Roy taught me decades ago. I lay several layers of Bounty paper towels over the surface and TAP it dry. Never, ever rub the surface.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Kathlene Wright
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 11:19 AM
To: Kent Blackwell; Mark Ost
Cc: Roy Diffrient
Subject: Re: Last night observing

 

Yep, I can bring my 80mm one evening this week or next.  I'll just skip swimming the next morning. 

My 10" hasn't been spot on when navigating..... I've been having to do a little searching for my targets.  I find them, but with some effort.  Then it dawned on me, my finder scope is out of kilter.  It needs to be resynced with the telescope.  So now it's time to do some maintenance.  I need to install a new o-ring on the finder scope OTA anyway. 

And, I'll clean the mirror.  I'm going to get a couple of gallons of demineralized water.... we have well water.  Not good for optics.  I'm going to remove the whole mirror assembly.  I'll mark the screw hole orientation with a piece of painter's tape.  I'll check the collimation after reinstallation.  Should be good to go for another year.  It's a really nice telescope.

My sister and niece were in Williamsburg yesterday, so we went to visit them.  Got home around 11 last night.  Too late to start a star gazing session, so we hit the rack.       

On July 23, 2022 at 8:32 AM Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Yes, we had a good evening. I compared Mark's Takahashi 3.3mm TOE to my 3.4mm Vixen HR eyepiece and the Takahashi has a slightly larger field at 50° as opposed to 42° but as far as  sharpness goes I saw no difference. The Vixen is disconnected, too bad. I bought the whole set when they came out. Thanks Barry Ferrell for telling me about them years ago. Has he ever used his? Of course not!

 

Barry took delivery of a new Celestron 10" Dobsonian with plate solving Star Sense but he hasn't opened the box yet. No surprise there.

 

David, you should bring over your 80mm one night and join us for double star observing.

 

Kent


On Jul 23, 2022, at 8:22 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Well we had a pretty good session. Most of the night was fairly clear with passing clouds that finally built up to a full blanket around 2330 (1130 pm for recidivists).

 

We has a smorgasbord of objects last night, doubles, opens, planetaries. oh my. 

 

Kent and I saw a couple of nice doubles then we wandered over to Ophiucus to look at a bright planetary. At 600 something power it appeared to be very elongated like a...........how you say in these country... football. We could also make out an outer envelope but no central star. We observed it in the 6 inch and the 5 inch. Who says a 1.6mm eyepiece cannot be used? You just need tracking.

 

Kent started to look at open clusters. This is odd as normally they are not the prime dish on his menu. We looked at M-11. I looked at it in quite a few powers and frankly this object, really in many ways, is much better at low power where it just shines. I have noticed that globulars and tight star clusters take on a distinct shiny appearance at low powers. I call this viewing in context. It really is the nicest way to appreciate the beauty of these objects. That shine effect tends to disappear with more power and close examination. Kent found a 0.9 double that was fun to do in his 6. I found a 1.8 with a three magnitude difference. I was going to shoot at a 12.7 magnitude star but somehow the clouds had moved in by 1130 and put an end to that show. 

 

Roy I hope you get lots of opens with your new scope.

 

We discussed my budget and all the things Kent and Roy have generously ordered for me. With that big reflector on the list we are well north of 1 million dollars now COD. I just want to thank you all for your support. I could not have achieved this milestone without you help.

 

In short "I owe you"

 

This has been one very long hot spell. I think we were very lucky to have had a couple of good decades in excellent conditions for observing. I make no predictions for the future.

 

As a closing remark, have you noticed that the smaller pair of the double double is distinctly of a different color?

 

 


 

 


Roy Diffrient
 

I’ll just say that my reason for using paper towels after the final rinse of my mirrors is to avoid water spots.  Those spots can be maddening after a careful mirror cleaning.  As has been said, the towels are very gently applied with no rubbing, and simply soak up any water droplets, leaving very little moisture.  This has worked well on my mirrors for decades.  But I have seen other methods – there is a darkroom photo chemical (I forget the name) that prevents spots, but of course a few paper towels are more available, almost zero cost, and no chemicals to mix.

Roy


On Jul 25, 2022, at 10:12 PM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Sure. Actually there are two separate techniques for eyepieces and mirrors. Now I am not the be all and end all of how to do it so this is just my experience.

Eyepieces: My favorite method is using a product from Edmond Optics called Tech Spec.This is a professional optics cleaning liquid. Comes in a spray bottle. It is expensive but you don't need much so it lasts for a long time. I have two bottles that have gone for over three years. I use this with a lens cleaning cloth. I spray the Tech Spec on the cloth and not the lens. You don't want to get fluid between elements. I fold the cloth and gently wipe the face of the optics. If there is any dust or dirt gently brush off with a camera brush before using the cloth. Celestron makes a nice cleaning pen/brush that does a good job of this. (Don't use canned air. If the propellant gets out it can damage the coatings) If you have a bad oil spot that the Tech Spec cannot get at you can use charcoal lighter fluid like you buy in the store for cook outs. This is food grade and will remove the hardest stuff without damaging the coatings. Takahashi recommends this for bad spots that resist anything else.


Mirrors: This is where the Dawn comes in. Clean the mirror of dust or solid particles. Use a mixture of dawn/distilled water. Some throw alchohol into the mix. There are several way to mix this.gently wash the mirror and rinse with distilled water and allow to dry by placing paper towels on the mirror. Don't rub the mirror with the towels paper is very abrasive. It can damage the coatings or worse the reflective surface. Roy may have more to say about this. Usually clean the mirror outside the scope.

Best philosophy. Keep it clean and clean it only at a minimum. Never look at it at night with your red flashlight that way lies madness!

On Monday, July 25, 2022 at 08:43:01 PM EDT, Patrick Vartuli <pvartuli@...> wrote:


I would be interested in learning the secrets of cleaning the mirror and possibly an eyepiece.  I can bring the Dawn.  Thanks for the link Mark.

On Mon, Jul 25, 2022, 10:42 AM jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>
To: Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...>; kent@... <kent@...>
Cc: Roy Diffrient <mail@...>
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2022 at 10:40:51 AM EDT
Subject: Re: Last night observing

That's a pretty good method. Yes the thin wall of the tube can be a bit of problem getting the cell back in though not a major one. I have a secret...............................there are two Dawn formulas that act totally different!

A lot of the old advise for using dawn to clean birds and telescopic mirrors was written years ago when it was a different formula that the current issue of Dawn. I had heard from an old sea captain that if you had an oil spill you first put Dawn in the water and that drew the slick together. I doubted that so I did a bench test in a bucket and the Dawn just spread the mess out making it worse.

I found a source of the old Dawn detergent and lo and behold he was correct. There is a difference. It can be had at amazon for a bit of cost. Might be worth buying a couple to use for those mirror cleanings. The key word is "non concentrate". The stuff you now buy at the store (concentrated) is not as good for this.






On Sunday, July 24, 2022 at 11:26:24 AM EDT, kent@... <kent@...> wrote:


I’ll gladly help clean the mirror if you need help. It’s a real bitch to get the cell back in the thin-walled Orion steel tube. Other than that, it’s pretty easy. Once out of the mirror cell, I run distilled water  over the mirror. While the water is running. I use a drop of Dawn detergent and swirl it around with the palm of my hand.

 

Then I rinse with distilled water, and rinse again. After all soap is removed I lay the mirror face up on a table and use a trick Roy taught me decades ago. I lay several layers of Bounty paper towels over the surface and TAP it dry. Never, ever rub the surface.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Kathlene Wright
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 11:19 AM
To: Kent Blackwell; Mark Ost
Cc: Roy Diffrient
Subject: Re: Last night observing

 

Yep, I can bring my 80mm one evening this week or next.  I'll just skip swimming the next morning. 

My 10" hasn't been spot on when navigating..... I've been having to do a little searching for my targets.  I find them, but with some effort.  Then it dawned on me, my finder scope is out of kilter.  It needs to be resynced with the telescope.  So now it's time to do some maintenance.  I need to install a new o-ring on the finder scope OTA anyway. 

And, I'll clean the mirror.  I'm going to get a couple of gallons of demineralized water.... we have well water.  Not good for optics.  I'm going to remove the whole mirror assembly.  I'll mark the screw hole orientation with a piece of painter's tape.  I'll check the collimation after reinstallation.  Should be good to go for another year.  It's a really nice telescope.

My sister and niece were in Williamsburg yesterday, so we went to visit them.  Got home around 11 last night.  Too late to start a star gazing session, so we hit the rack.       

On July 23, 2022 at 8:32 AM Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Yes, we had a good evening. I compared Mark's Takahashi 3.3mm TOE to my 3.4mm Vixen HR eyepiece and the Takahashi has a slightly larger field at 50° as opposed to 42° but as far as  sharpness goes I saw no difference. The Vixen is disconnected, too bad. I bought the whole set when they came out. Thanks Barry Ferrell for telling me about them years ago. Has he ever used his? Of course not!

 

Barry took delivery of a new Celestron 10" Dobsonian with plate solving Star Sense but he hasn't opened the box yet. No surprise there.

 

David, you should bring over your 80mm one night and join us for double star observing.

 

Kent


On Jul 23, 2022, at 8:22 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Well we had a pretty good session. Most of the night was fairly clear with passing clouds that finally built up to a full blanket around 2330 (1130 pm for recidivists).

 

We has a smorgasbord of objects last night, doubles, opens, planetaries. oh my. 

 

Kent and I saw a couple of nice doubles then we wandered over to Ophiucus to look at a bright planetary. At 600 something power it appeared to be very elongated like a...........how you say in these country... football. We could also make out an outer envelope but no central star. We observed it in the 6 inch and the 5 inch. Who says a 1.6mm eyepiece cannot be used? You just need tracking.

 

Kent started to look at open clusters. This is odd as normally they are not the prime dish on his menu. We looked at M-11. I looked at it in quite a few powers and frankly this object, really in many ways, is much better at low power where it just shines. I have noticed that globulars and tight star clusters take on a distinct shiny appearance at low powers. I call this viewing in context. It really is the nicest way to appreciate the beauty of these objects. That shine effect tends to disappear with more power and close examination. Kent found a 0.9 double that was fun to do in his 6. I found a 1.8 with a three magnitude difference. I was going to shoot at a 12.7 magnitude star but somehow the clouds had moved in by 1130 and put an end to that show. 

 

Roy I hope you get lots of opens with your new scope.

 

We discussed my budget and all the things Kent and Roy have generously ordered for me. With that big reflector on the list we are well north of 1 million dollars now COD. I just want to thank you all for your support. I could not have achieved this milestone without you help.

 

In short "I owe you"

 

This has been one very long hot spell. I think we were very lucky to have had a couple of good decades in excellent conditions for observing. I make no predictions for the future.

 

As a closing remark, have you noticed that the smaller pair of the double double is distinctly of a different color?

 

 


 

 


jimcoble2000
 

photo flow

On Monday, July 25, 2022 at 11:03:19 PM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


I’ll just say that my reason for using paper towels after the final rinse of my mirrors is to avoid water spots.  Those spots can be maddening after a careful mirror cleaning.  As has been said, the towels are very gently applied with no rubbing, and simply soak up any water droplets, leaving very little moisture.  This has worked well on my mirrors for decades.  But I have seen other methods – there is a darkroom photo chemical (I forget the name) that prevents spots, but of course a few paper towels are more available, almost zero cost, and no chemicals to mix.

Roy


On Jul 25, 2022, at 10:12 PM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Sure. Actually there are two separate techniques for eyepieces and mirrors. Now I am not the be all and end all of how to do it so this is just my experience.

Eyepieces: My favorite method is using a product from Edmond Optics called Tech Spec.This is a professional optics cleaning liquid. Comes in a spray bottle. It is expensive but you don't need much so it lasts for a long time. I have two bottles that have gone for over three years. I use this with a lens cleaning cloth. I spray the Tech Spec on the cloth and not the lens. You don't want to get fluid between elements. I fold the cloth and gently wipe the face of the optics. If there is any dust or dirt gently brush off with a camera brush before using the cloth. Celestron makes a nice cleaning pen/brush that does a good job of this. (Don't use canned air. If the propellant gets out it can damage the coatings) If you have a bad oil spot that the Tech Spec cannot get at you can use charcoal lighter fluid like you buy in the store for cook outs. This is food grade and will remove the hardest stuff without damaging the coatings. Takahashi recommends this for bad spots that resist anything else.


Mirrors: This is where the Dawn comes in. Clean the mirror of dust or solid particles. Use a mixture of dawn/distilled water. Some throw alchohol into the mix. There are several way to mix this.gently wash the mirror and rinse with distilled water and allow to dry by placing paper towels on the mirror. Don't rub the mirror with the towels paper is very abrasive. It can damage the coatings or worse the reflective surface. Roy may have more to say about this. Usually clean the mirror outside the scope.

Best philosophy. Keep it clean and clean it only at a minimum. Never look at it at night with your red flashlight that way lies madness!

On Monday, July 25, 2022 at 08:43:01 PM EDT, Patrick Vartuli <pvartuli@...> wrote:


I would be interested in learning the secrets of cleaning the mirror and possibly an eyepiece.  I can bring the Dawn.  Thanks for the link Mark.

On Mon, Jul 25, 2022, 10:42 AM jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>
To: Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...>; kent@... <kent@...>
Cc: Roy Diffrient <mail@...>
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2022 at 10:40:51 AM EDT
Subject: Re: Last night observing

That's a pretty good method. Yes the thin wall of the tube can be a bit of problem getting the cell back in though not a major one. I have a secret...............................there are two Dawn formulas that act totally different!

A lot of the old advise for using dawn to clean birds and telescopic mirrors was written years ago when it was a different formula that the current issue of Dawn. I had heard from an old sea captain that if you had an oil spill you first put Dawn in the water and that drew the slick together. I doubted that so I did a bench test in a bucket and the Dawn just spread the mess out making it worse.

I found a source of the old Dawn detergent and lo and behold he was correct. There is a difference. It can be had at amazon for a bit of cost. Might be worth buying a couple to use for those mirror cleanings. The key word is "non concentrate". The stuff you now buy at the store (concentrated) is not as good for this.






On Sunday, July 24, 2022 at 11:26:24 AM EDT, kent@... <kent@...> wrote:


I’ll gladly help clean the mirror if you need help. It’s a real bitch to get the cell back in the thin-walled Orion steel tube. Other than that, it’s pretty easy. Once out of the mirror cell, I run distilled water  over the mirror. While the water is running. I use a drop of Dawn detergent and swirl it around with the palm of my hand.

 

Then I rinse with distilled water, and rinse again. After all soap is removed I lay the mirror face up on a table and use a trick Roy taught me decades ago. I lay several layers of Bounty paper towels over the surface and TAP it dry. Never, ever rub the surface.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Kathlene Wright
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 11:19 AM
To: Kent Blackwell; Mark Ost
Cc: Roy Diffrient
Subject: Re: Last night observing

 

Yep, I can bring my 80mm one evening this week or next.  I'll just skip swimming the next morning. 

My 10" hasn't been spot on when navigating..... I've been having to do a little searching for my targets.  I find them, but with some effort.  Then it dawned on me, my finder scope is out of kilter.  It needs to be resynced with the telescope.  So now it's time to do some maintenance.  I need to install a new o-ring on the finder scope OTA anyway. 

And, I'll clean the mirror.  I'm going to get a couple of gallons of demineralized water.... we have well water.  Not good for optics.  I'm going to remove the whole mirror assembly.  I'll mark the screw hole orientation with a piece of painter's tape.  I'll check the collimation after reinstallation.  Should be good to go for another year.  It's a really nice telescope.

My sister and niece were in Williamsburg yesterday, so we went to visit them.  Got home around 11 last night.  Too late to start a star gazing session, so we hit the rack.       

On July 23, 2022 at 8:32 AM Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Yes, we had a good evening. I compared Mark's Takahashi 3.3mm TOE to my 3.4mm Vixen HR eyepiece and the Takahashi has a slightly larger field at 50° as opposed to 42° but as far as  sharpness goes I saw no difference. The Vixen is disconnected, too bad. I bought the whole set when they came out. Thanks Barry Ferrell for telling me about them years ago. Has he ever used his? Of course not!

 

Barry took delivery of a new Celestron 10" Dobsonian with plate solving Star Sense but he hasn't opened the box yet. No surprise there.

 

David, you should bring over your 80mm one night and join us for double star observing.

 

Kent


On Jul 23, 2022, at 8:22 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Well we had a pretty good session. Most of the night was fairly clear with passing clouds that finally built up to a full blanket around 2330 (1130 pm for recidivists).

 

We has a smorgasbord of objects last night, doubles, opens, planetaries. oh my. 

 

Kent and I saw a couple of nice doubles then we wandered over to Ophiucus to look at a bright planetary. At 600 something power it appeared to be very elongated like a...........how you say in these country... football. We could also make out an outer envelope but no central star. We observed it in the 6 inch and the 5 inch. Who says a 1.6mm eyepiece cannot be used? You just need tracking.

 

Kent started to look at open clusters. This is odd as normally they are not the prime dish on his menu. We looked at M-11. I looked at it in quite a few powers and frankly this object, really in many ways, is much better at low power where it just shines. I have noticed that globulars and tight star clusters take on a distinct shiny appearance at low powers. I call this viewing in context. It really is the nicest way to appreciate the beauty of these objects. That shine effect tends to disappear with more power and close examination. Kent found a 0.9 double that was fun to do in his 6. I found a 1.8 with a three magnitude difference. I was going to shoot at a 12.7 magnitude star but somehow the clouds had moved in by 1130 and put an end to that show. 

 

Roy I hope you get lots of opens with your new scope.

 

We discussed my budget and all the things Kent and Roy have generously ordered for me. With that big reflector on the list we are well north of 1 million dollars now COD. I just want to thank you all for your support. I could not have achieved this milestone without you help.

 

In short "I owe you"

 

This has been one very long hot spell. I think we were very lucky to have had a couple of good decades in excellent conditions for observing. I make no predictions for the future.

 

As a closing remark, have you noticed that the smaller pair of the double double is distinctly of a different color?

 

 


 

 


George Reynolds
 

Mark,

I followed your link and your advice and ordered non-concentrated Dawn detergent from Amazon.  It comes in a 3-pack of 12.68-oz bottles for $13.66.  Add in Shipping ($5.99) and tax ($.92) and the cost was $20.57.  But I had some Amazon Prime credits which I used, so I got it FREE.

I will have enough Dawn for the whole club!  Shawn, do you want to schedule a workshop for mirror cleaning?   

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Monday, July 25, 2022, 10:42:34 AM EDT, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:




----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>

To: Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...>; kent@... <kent@...>
Cc: Roy Diffrient <mail@...>
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2022 at 10:40:51 AM EDT
Subject: Re: Last night observing

That's a pretty good method. Yes the thin wall of the tube can be a bit of problem getting the cell back in though not a major one. I have a secret...............................there are two Dawn formulas that act totally different!

A lot of the old advise for using dawn to clean birds and telescopic mirrors was written years ago when it was a different formula that the current issue of Dawn. I had heard from an old sea captain that if you had an oil spill you first put Dawn in the water and that drew the slick together. I doubted that so I did a bench test in a bucket and the Dawn just spread the mess out making it worse.

I found a source of the old Dawn detergent and lo and behold he was correct. There is a difference. It can be had at amazon for a bit of cost. Might be worth buying a couple to use for those mirror cleanings. The key word is "non concentrate". The stuff you now buy at the store (concentrated) is not as good for this.






On Sunday, July 24, 2022 at 11:26:24 AM EDT, kent@... <kent@...> wrote:


I’ll gladly help clean the mirror if you need help. It’s a real bitch to get the cell back in the thin-walled Orion steel tube. Other than that, it’s pretty easy. Once out of the mirror cell, I run distilled water  over the mirror. While the water is running. I use a drop of Dawn detergent and swirl it around with the palm of my hand.

 

Then I rinse with distilled water, and rinse again. After all soap is removed I lay the mirror face up on a table and use a trick Roy taught me decades ago. I lay several layers of Bounty paper towels over the surface and TAP it dry. Never, ever rub the surface.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Kathlene Wright
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 11:19 AM
To: Kent Blackwell; Mark Ost
Cc: Roy Diffrient
Subject: Re: Last night observing

 

Yep, I can bring my 80mm one evening this week or next.  I'll just skip swimming the next morning. 

My 10" hasn't been spot on when navigating..... I've been having to do a little searching for my targets.  I find them, but with some effort.  Then it dawned on me, my finder scope is out of kilter.  It needs to be resynced with the telescope.  So now it's time to do some maintenance.  I need to install a new o-ring on the finder scope OTA anyway. 

And, I'll clean the mirror.  I'm going to get a couple of gallons of demineralized water.... we have well water.  Not good for optics.  I'm going to remove the whole mirror assembly.  I'll mark the screw hole orientation with a piece of painter's tape.  I'll check the collimation after reinstallation.  Should be good to go for another year.  It's a really nice telescope.

My sister and niece were in Williamsburg yesterday, so we went to visit them.  Got home around 11 last night.  Too late to start a star gazing session, so we hit the rack.       

On July 23, 2022 at 8:32 AM Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Yes, we had a good evening. I compared Mark's Takahashi 3.3mm TOE to my 3.4mm Vixen HR eyepiece and the Takahashi has a slightly larger field at 50° as opposed to 42° but as far as  sharpness goes I saw no difference. The Vixen is disconnected, too bad. I bought the whole set when they came out. Thanks Barry Ferrell for telling me about them years ago. Has he ever used his? Of course not!

 

Barry took delivery of a new Celestron 10" Dobsonian with plate solving Star Sense but he hasn't opened the box yet. No surprise there.

 

David, you should bring over your 80mm one night and join us for double star observing.

 

Kent


On Jul 23, 2022, at 8:22 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Well we had a pretty good session. Most of the night was fairly clear with passing clouds that finally built up to a full blanket around 2330 (1130 pm for recidivists).

 

We has a smorgasbord of objects last night, doubles, opens, planetaries. oh my. 

 

Kent and I saw a couple of nice doubles then we wandered over to Ophiucus to look at a bright planetary. At 600 something power it appeared to be very elongated like a...........how you say in these country... football. We could also make out an outer envelope but no central star. We observed it in the 6 inch and the 5 inch. Who says a 1.6mm eyepiece cannot be used? You just need tracking.

 

Kent started to look at open clusters. This is odd as normally they are not the prime dish on his menu. We looked at M-11. I looked at it in quite a few powers and frankly this object, really in many ways, is much better at low power where it just shines. I have noticed that globulars and tight star clusters take on a distinct shiny appearance at low powers. I call this viewing in context. It really is the nicest way to appreciate the beauty of these objects. That shine effect tends to disappear with more power and close examination. Kent found a 0.9 double that was fun to do in his 6. I found a 1.8 with a three magnitude difference. I was going to shoot at a 12.7 magnitude star but somehow the clouds had moved in by 1130 and put an end to that show. 

 

Roy I hope you get lots of opens with your new scope.

 

We discussed my budget and all the things Kent and Roy have generously ordered for me. With that big reflector on the list we are well north of 1 million dollars now COD. I just want to thank you all for your support. I could not have achieved this milestone without you help.

 

In short "I owe you"

 

This has been one very long hot spell. I think we were very lucky to have had a couple of good decades in excellent conditions for observing. I make no predictions for the future.

 

As a closing remark, have you noticed that the smaller pair of the double double is distinctly of a different color?

 

 


 

 


George Reynolds
 

I do the paper towel trick to dry my glasses after cleaning the lenses.  Blot, don't rub.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Monday, July 25, 2022, 08:55:17 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


Everyone has their own method. I never use soap anymore, just distilled water. I do use the paper towel trick to dry the mirror – along with sterile cotton.

 

For small mirrors that I can pick up and bring to a sink, I first just wash it under the faucet – then rinse copiously with distilled water. Seems to work just fine.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2022 7:43 AM
To: BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Fw: Last night observing

 

 

 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>

To: Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...>; kent@... <kent@...>

Cc: Roy Diffrient <mail@...>

Sent: Monday, July 25, 2022 at 10:40:51 AM EDT

Subject: Re: Last night observing

 

That's a pretty good method. Yes the thin wall of the tube can be a bit of problem getting the cell back in though not a major one. I have a secret...............................there are two Dawn formulas that act totally different!

 

A lot of the old advise for using dawn to clean birds and telescopic mirrors was written years ago when it was a different formula that the current issue of Dawn. I had heard from an old sea captain that if you had an oil spill you first put Dawn in the water and that drew the slick together. I doubted that so I did a bench test in a bucket and the Dawn just spread the mess out making it worse.

 

I found a source of the old Dawn detergent and lo and behold he was correct. There is a difference. It can be had at amazon for a bit of cost. Might be worth buying a couple to use for those mirror cleanings. The key word is "non concentrate". The stuff you now buy at the store (concentrated) is not as good for this.

 

 

Dawn Non Concentrated Original Dishwashing Liquid, 12.6 Fluid Ounce 3 pe...

Dawn Non Concentrated Original Dishwashing Liquid, 12.6 Fluid Ounce pack of 3 bottles

 

 

 

 

On Sunday, July 24, 2022 at 11:26:24 AM EDT, kent@... <kent@...> wrote:

 

 

I’ll gladly help clean the mirror if you need help. It’s a real bitch to get the cell back in the thin-walled Orion steel tube. Other than that, it’s pretty easy. Once out of the mirror cell, I run distilled water  over the mirror. While the water is running. I use a drop of Dawn detergent and swirl it around with the palm of my hand.

 

Then I rinse with distilled water, and rinse again. After all soap is removed I lay the mirror face up on a table and use a trick Roy taught me decades ago. I lay several layers of Bounty paper towels over the surface and TAP it dry. Never, ever rub the surface.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Kathlene Wright
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 11:19 AM
To: Kent Blackwell; Mark Ost
Cc: Roy Diffrient
Subject: Re: Last night observing

 

Yep, I can bring my 80mm one evening this week or next.  I'll just skip swimming the next morning. 

My 10" hasn't been spot on when navigating..... I've been having to do a little searching for my targets.  I find them, but with some effort.  Then it dawned on me, my finder scope is out of kilter.  It needs to be resynced with the telescope.  So now it's time to do some maintenance.  I need to install a new o-ring on the finder scope OTA anyway. 

And, I'll clean the mirror.  I'm going to get a couple of gallons of demineralized water.... we have well water.  Not good for optics.  I'm going to remove the whole mirror assembly.  I'll mark the screw hole orientation with a piece of painter's tape.  I'll check the collimation after reinstallation.  Should be good to go for another year.  It's a really nice telescope.

My sister and niece were in Williamsburg yesterday, so we went to visit them.  Got home around 11 last night.  Too late to start a star gazing session, so we hit the rack.       

On July 23, 2022 at 8:32 AM Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Yes, we had a good evening. I compared Mark's Takahashi 3.3mm TOE to my 3.4mm Vixen HR eyepiece and the Takahashi has a slightly larger field at 50° as opposed to 42° but as far as  sharpness goes I saw no difference. The Vixen is disconnected, too bad. I bought the whole set when they came out. Thanks Barry Ferrell for telling me about them years ago. Has he ever used his? Of course not!

 

Barry took delivery of a new Celestron 10" Dobsonian with plate solving Star Sense but he hasn't opened the box yet. No surprise there.

 

David, you should bring over your 80mm one night and join us for double star observing.

 

Kent


On Jul 23, 2022, at 8:22 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Well we had a pretty good session. Most of the night was fairly clear with passing clouds that finally built up to a full blanket around 2330 (1130 pm for recidivists).

 

We has a smorgasbord of objects last night, doubles, opens, planetaries. oh my. 

 

Kent and I saw a couple of nice doubles then we wandered over to Ophiucus to look at a bright planetary. At 600 something power it appeared to be very elongated like a...........how you say in these country... football. We could also make out an outer envelope but no central star. We observed it in the 6 inch and the 5 inch. Who says a 1.6mm eyepiece cannot be used? You just need tracking.

 

Kent started to look at open clusters. This is odd as normally they are not the prime dish on his menu. We looked at M-11. I looked at it in quite a few powers and frankly this object, really in many ways, is much better at low power where it just shines. I have noticed that globulars and tight star clusters take on a distinct shiny appearance at low powers. I call this viewing in context. It really is the nicest way to appreciate the beauty of these objects. That shine effect tends to disappear with more power and close examination. Kent found a 0.9 double that was fun to do in his 6. I found a 1.8 with a three magnitude difference. I was going to shoot at a 12.7 magnitude star but somehow the clouds had moved in by 1130 and put an end to that show. 

 

Roy I hope you get lots of opens with your new scope.

 

We discussed my budget and all the things Kent and Roy have generously ordered for me. With that big reflector on the list we are well north of 1 million dollars now COD. I just want to thank you all for your support. I could not have achieved this milestone without you help.

 

In short "I owe you"

 

This has been one very long hot spell. I think we were very lucky to have had a couple of good decades in excellent conditions for observing. I make no predictions for the future.

 

As a closing remark, have you noticed that the smaller pair of the double double is distinctly of a different color?

 

 


 

 


George Reynolds
 

You're right, Bill, but SOME DAY, if the club has a mirror-cleaning workshop, I will clean the mirror in my 10-inch Dob.  

I actually haven't used it in several years.  It needs some repair.  I need to replace the Teflon sliders for azimuth rotation.  I also have a new focuser I want to put on it, but I will need to drill some new holes.  I just need to get a round tuit.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Monday, July 25, 2022, 08:57:56 PM EDT, preciousmyprecious via groups.io <preciousmyprecious@...> wrote:


Never clean it. Unless a bird pooped on it or someone spilled a Mars tini on it. I have compared George's 10inch which has the dust of Nebuchadnezzar on it with my clean 10inch and  could see no difference dim or bright object. Run the comparison yourself. I doubt George has cleaned it yet.  

Carpe Noctum
Bill McLean


jimcoble2000
 

it is a bit expensive isn't it?

On Tuesday, July 26, 2022 at 09:47:38 AM EDT, George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...> wrote:


Mark,

I followed your link and your advice and ordered non-concentrated Dawn detergent from Amazon.  It comes in a 3-pack of 12.68-oz bottles for $13.66.  Add in Shipping ($5.99) and tax ($.92) and the cost was $20.57.  But I had some Amazon Prime credits which I used, so I got it FREE.

I will have enough Dawn for the whole club!  Shawn, do you want to schedule a workshop for mirror cleaning?   

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Monday, July 25, 2022, 10:42:34 AM EDT, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:




----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>

To: Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...>; kent@... <kent@...>
Cc: Roy Diffrient <mail@...>
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2022 at 10:40:51 AM EDT
Subject: Re: Last night observing

That's a pretty good method. Yes the thin wall of the tube can be a bit of problem getting the cell back in though not a major one. I have a secret...............................there are two Dawn formulas that act totally different!

A lot of the old advise for using dawn to clean birds and telescopic mirrors was written years ago when it was a different formula that the current issue of Dawn. I had heard from an old sea captain that if you had an oil spill you first put Dawn in the water and that drew the slick together. I doubted that so I did a bench test in a bucket and the Dawn just spread the mess out making it worse.

I found a source of the old Dawn detergent and lo and behold he was correct. There is a difference. It can be had at amazon for a bit of cost. Might be worth buying a couple to use for those mirror cleanings. The key word is "non concentrate". The stuff you now buy at the store (concentrated) is not as good for this.






On Sunday, July 24, 2022 at 11:26:24 AM EDT, kent@... <kent@...> wrote:


I’ll gladly help clean the mirror if you need help. It’s a real bitch to get the cell back in the thin-walled Orion steel tube. Other than that, it’s pretty easy. Once out of the mirror cell, I run distilled water  over the mirror. While the water is running. I use a drop of Dawn detergent and swirl it around with the palm of my hand.

 

Then I rinse with distilled water, and rinse again. After all soap is removed I lay the mirror face up on a table and use a trick Roy taught me decades ago. I lay several layers of Bounty paper towels over the surface and TAP it dry. Never, ever rub the surface.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Kathlene Wright
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 11:19 AM
To: Kent Blackwell; Mark Ost
Cc: Roy Diffrient
Subject: Re: Last night observing

 

Yep, I can bring my 80mm one evening this week or next.  I'll just skip swimming the next morning. 

My 10" hasn't been spot on when navigating..... I've been having to do a little searching for my targets.  I find them, but with some effort.  Then it dawned on me, my finder scope is out of kilter.  It needs to be resynced with the telescope.  So now it's time to do some maintenance.  I need to install a new o-ring on the finder scope OTA anyway. 

And, I'll clean the mirror.  I'm going to get a couple of gallons of demineralized water.... we have well water.  Not good for optics.  I'm going to remove the whole mirror assembly.  I'll mark the screw hole orientation with a piece of painter's tape.  I'll check the collimation after reinstallation.  Should be good to go for another year.  It's a really nice telescope.

My sister and niece were in Williamsburg yesterday, so we went to visit them.  Got home around 11 last night.  Too late to start a star gazing session, so we hit the rack.       

On July 23, 2022 at 8:32 AM Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Yes, we had a good evening. I compared Mark's Takahashi 3.3mm TOE to my 3.4mm Vixen HR eyepiece and the Takahashi has a slightly larger field at 50° as opposed to 42° but as far as  sharpness goes I saw no difference. The Vixen is disconnected, too bad. I bought the whole set when they came out. Thanks Barry Ferrell for telling me about them years ago. Has he ever used his? Of course not!

 

Barry took delivery of a new Celestron 10" Dobsonian with plate solving Star Sense but he hasn't opened the box yet. No surprise there.

 

David, you should bring over your 80mm one night and join us for double star observing.

 

Kent


On Jul 23, 2022, at 8:22 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Well we had a pretty good session. Most of the night was fairly clear with passing clouds that finally built up to a full blanket around 2330 (1130 pm for recidivists).

 

We has a smorgasbord of objects last night, doubles, opens, planetaries. oh my. 

 

Kent and I saw a couple of nice doubles then we wandered over to Ophiucus to look at a bright planetary. At 600 something power it appeared to be very elongated like a...........how you say in these country... football. We could also make out an outer envelope but no central star. We observed it in the 6 inch and the 5 inch. Who says a 1.6mm eyepiece cannot be used? You just need tracking.

 

Kent started to look at open clusters. This is odd as normally they are not the prime dish on his menu. We looked at M-11. I looked at it in quite a few powers and frankly this object, really in many ways, is much better at low power where it just shines. I have noticed that globulars and tight star clusters take on a distinct shiny appearance at low powers. I call this viewing in context. It really is the nicest way to appreciate the beauty of these objects. That shine effect tends to disappear with more power and close examination. Kent found a 0.9 double that was fun to do in his 6. I found a 1.8 with a three magnitude difference. I was going to shoot at a 12.7 magnitude star but somehow the clouds had moved in by 1130 and put an end to that show. 

 

Roy I hope you get lots of opens with your new scope.

 

We discussed my budget and all the things Kent and Roy have generously ordered for me. With that big reflector on the list we are well north of 1 million dollars now COD. I just want to thank you all for your support. I could not have achieved this milestone without you help.

 

In short "I owe you"

 

This has been one very long hot spell. I think we were very lucky to have had a couple of good decades in excellent conditions for observing. I make no predictions for the future.

 

As a closing remark, have you noticed that the smaller pair of the double double is distinctly of a different color?

 

 


 

 


Roy Diffrient
 

Yes, Kodak Photo-Flo.  Since film photography is nearly extinct there may not be many sources for this stuff.  And only a very tiny amount is used for mirror washing.  I’m not recommending it, but I remembered where I saw it: Dr. Clay’s optics cleaning recipe –


Roy


On Jul 26, 2022, at 7:26 AM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


photo flow

On Monday, July 25, 2022 at 11:03:19 PM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


I’ll just say that my reason for using paper towels after the final rinse of my mirrors is to avoid water spots.  Those spots can be maddening after a careful mirror cleaning.  As has been said, the towels are very gently applied with no rubbing, and simply soak up any water droplets, leaving very little moisture.  This has worked well on my mirrors for decades.  But I have seen other methods – there is a darkroom photo chemical (I forget the name) that prevents spots, but of course a few paper towels are more available, almost zero cost, and no chemicals to mix.

Roy


On Jul 25, 2022, at 10:12 PM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Sure. Actually there are two separate techniques for eyepieces and mirrors. Now I am not the be all and end all of how to do it so this is just my experience.

Eyepieces: My favorite method is using a product from Edmond Optics called Tech Spec.This is a professional optics cleaning liquid. Comes in a spray bottle. It is expensive but you don't need much so it lasts for a long time. I have two bottles that have gone for over three years. I use this with a lens cleaning cloth. I spray the Tech Spec on the cloth and not the lens. You don't want to get fluid between elements. I fold the cloth and gently wipe the face of the optics. If there is any dust or dirt gently brush off with a camera brush before using the cloth. Celestron makes a nice cleaning pen/brush that does a good job of this. (Don't use canned air. If the propellant gets out it can damage the coatings) If you have a bad oil spot that the Tech Spec cannot get at you can use charcoal lighter fluid like you buy in the store for cook outs. This is food grade and will remove the hardest stuff without damaging the coatings. Takahashi recommends this for bad spots that resist anything else.


Mirrors: This is where the Dawn comes in. Clean the mirror of dust or solid particles. Use a mixture of dawn/distilled water. Some throw alchohol into the mix. There are several way to mix this.gently wash the mirror and rinse with distilled water and allow to dry by placing paper towels on the mirror. Don't rub the mirror with the towels paper is very abrasive. It can damage the coatings or worse the reflective surface. Roy may have more to say about this. Usually clean the mirror outside the scope.

Best philosophy. Keep it clean and clean it only at a minimum. Never look at it at night with your red flashlight that way lies madness!

On Monday, July 25, 2022 at 08:43:01 PM EDT, Patrick Vartuli <pvartuli@...> wrote:


I would be interested in learning the secrets of cleaning the mirror and possibly an eyepiece.  I can bring the Dawn.  Thanks for the link Mark.

On Mon, Jul 25, 2022, 10:42 AM jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>
To: Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...>; kent@... <kent@...>
Cc: Roy Diffrient <mail@...>
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2022 at 10:40:51 AM EDT
Subject: Re: Last night observing

That's a pretty good method. Yes the thin wall of the tube can be a bit of problem getting the cell back in though not a major one. I have a secret...............................there are two Dawn formulas that act totally different!

A lot of the old advise for using dawn to clean birds and telescopic mirrors was written years ago when it was a different formula that the current issue of Dawn. I had heard from an old sea captain that if you had an oil spill you first put Dawn in the water and that drew the slick together. I doubted that so I did a bench test in a bucket and the Dawn just spread the mess out making it worse.

I found a source of the old Dawn detergent and lo and behold he was correct. There is a difference. It can be had at amazon for a bit of cost. Might be worth buying a couple to use for those mirror cleanings. The key word is "non concentrate". The stuff you now buy at the store (concentrated) is not as good for this.






On Sunday, July 24, 2022 at 11:26:24 AM EDT, kent@... <kent@...> wrote:


I’ll gladly help clean the mirror if you need help. It’s a real bitch to get the cell back in the thin-walled Orion steel tube. Other than that, it’s pretty easy. Once out of the mirror cell, I run distilled water  over the mirror. While the water is running. I use a drop of Dawn detergent and swirl it around with the palm of my hand.

 

Then I rinse with distilled water, and rinse again. After all soap is removed I lay the mirror face up on a table and use a trick Roy taught me decades ago. I lay several layers of Bounty paper towels over the surface and TAP it dry. Never, ever rub the surface.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Kathlene Wright
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 11:19 AM
To: Kent Blackwell; Mark Ost
Cc: Roy Diffrient
Subject: Re: Last night observing

 

Yep, I can bring my 80mm one evening this week or next.  I'll just skip swimming the next morning. 

My 10" hasn't been spot on when navigating..... I've been having to do a little searching for my targets.  I find them, but with some effort.  Then it dawned on me, my finder scope is out of kilter.  It needs to be resynced with the telescope.  So now it's time to do some maintenance.  I need to install a new o-ring on the finder scope OTA anyway. 

And, I'll clean the mirror.  I'm going to get a couple of gallons of demineralized water.... we have well water.  Not good for optics.  I'm going to remove the whole mirror assembly.  I'll mark the screw hole orientation with a piece of painter's tape.  I'll check the collimation after reinstallation.  Should be good to go for another year.  It's a really nice telescope.

My sister and niece were in Williamsburg yesterday, so we went to visit them.  Got home around 11 last night.  Too late to start a star gazing session, so we hit the rack.       

On July 23, 2022 at 8:32 AM Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Yes, we had a good evening. I compared Mark's Takahashi 3.3mm TOE to my 3.4mm Vixen HR eyepiece and the Takahashi has a slightly larger field at 50° as opposed to 42° but as far as  sharpness goes I saw no difference. The Vixen is disconnected, too bad. I bought the whole set when they came out. Thanks Barry Ferrell for telling me about them years ago. Has he ever used his? Of course not!

 

Barry took delivery of a new Celestron 10" Dobsonian with plate solving Star Sense but he hasn't opened the box yet. No surprise there.

 

David, you should bring over your 80mm one night and join us for double star observing.

 

Kent


On Jul 23, 2022, at 8:22 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Well we had a pretty good session. Most of the night was fairly clear with passing clouds that finally built up to a full blanket around 2330 (1130 pm for recidivists).

 

We has a smorgasbord of objects last night, doubles, opens, planetaries. oh my. 

 

Kent and I saw a couple of nice doubles then we wandered over to Ophiucus to look at a bright planetary. At 600 something power it appeared to be very elongated like a...........how you say in these country... football. We could also make out an outer envelope but no central star. We observed it in the 6 inch and the 5 inch. Who says a 1.6mm eyepiece cannot be used? You just need tracking.

 

Kent started to look at open clusters. This is odd as normally they are not the prime dish on his menu. We looked at M-11. I looked at it in quite a few powers and frankly this object, really in many ways, is much better at low power where it just shines. I have noticed that globulars and tight star clusters take on a distinct shiny appearance at low powers. I call this viewing in context. It really is the nicest way to appreciate the beauty of these objects. That shine effect tends to disappear with more power and close examination. Kent found a 0.9 double that was fun to do in his 6. I found a 1.8 with a three magnitude difference. I was going to shoot at a 12.7 magnitude star but somehow the clouds had moved in by 1130 and put an end to that show. 

 

Roy I hope you get lots of opens with your new scope.

 

We discussed my budget and all the things Kent and Roy have generously ordered for me. With that big reflector on the list we are well north of 1 million dollars now COD. I just want to thank you all for your support. I could not have achieved this milestone without you help.

 

In short "I owe you"

 

This has been one very long hot spell. I think we were very lucky to have had a couple of good decades in excellent conditions for observing. I make no predictions for the future.

 

As a closing remark, have you noticed that the smaller pair of the double double is distinctly of a different color?

 

 


 

 


Patrick Vartuli
 

So I did the same thing.  I think the club is covered for the next 20 or so years.

Patrick 


On Tue, Jul 26, 2022, 9:47 AM George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mark,

I followed your link and your advice and ordered non-concentrated Dawn detergent from Amazon.  It comes in a 3-pack of 12.68-oz bottles for $13.66.  Add in Shipping ($5.99) and tax ($.92) and the cost was $20.57.  But I had some Amazon Prime credits which I used, so I got it FREE.

I will have enough Dawn for the whole club!  Shawn, do you want to schedule a workshop for mirror cleaning?   

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Monday, July 25, 2022, 10:42:34 AM EDT, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:




----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>
To: Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...>; kent@... <kent@...>
Cc: Roy Diffrient <mail@...>
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2022 at 10:40:51 AM EDT
Subject: Re: Last night observing

That's a pretty good method. Yes the thin wall of the tube can be a bit of problem getting the cell back in though not a major one. I have a secret...............................there are two Dawn formulas that act totally different!

A lot of the old advise for using dawn to clean birds and telescopic mirrors was written years ago when it was a different formula that the current issue of Dawn. I had heard from an old sea captain that if you had an oil spill you first put Dawn in the water and that drew the slick together. I doubted that so I did a bench test in a bucket and the Dawn just spread the mess out making it worse.

I found a source of the old Dawn detergent and lo and behold he was correct. There is a difference. It can be had at amazon for a bit of cost. Might be worth buying a couple to use for those mirror cleanings. The key word is "non concentrate". The stuff you now buy at the store (concentrated) is not as good for this.






On Sunday, July 24, 2022 at 11:26:24 AM EDT, kent@... <kent@...> wrote:


I’ll gladly help clean the mirror if you need help. It’s a real bitch to get the cell back in the thin-walled Orion steel tube. Other than that, it’s pretty easy. Once out of the mirror cell, I run distilled water  over the mirror. While the water is running. I use a drop of Dawn detergent and swirl it around with the palm of my hand.

 

Then I rinse with distilled water, and rinse again. After all soap is removed I lay the mirror face up on a table and use a trick Roy taught me decades ago. I lay several layers of Bounty paper towels over the surface and TAP it dry. Never, ever rub the surface.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Kathlene Wright
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 11:19 AM
To: Kent Blackwell; Mark Ost
Cc: Roy Diffrient
Subject: Re: Last night observing

 

Yep, I can bring my 80mm one evening this week or next.  I'll just skip swimming the next morning. 

My 10" hasn't been spot on when navigating..... I've been having to do a little searching for my targets.  I find them, but with some effort.  Then it dawned on me, my finder scope is out of kilter.  It needs to be resynced with the telescope.  So now it's time to do some maintenance.  I need to install a new o-ring on the finder scope OTA anyway. 

And, I'll clean the mirror.  I'm going to get a couple of gallons of demineralized water.... we have well water.  Not good for optics.  I'm going to remove the whole mirror assembly.  I'll mark the screw hole orientation with a piece of painter's tape.  I'll check the collimation after reinstallation.  Should be good to go for another year.  It's a really nice telescope.

My sister and niece were in Williamsburg yesterday, so we went to visit them.  Got home around 11 last night.  Too late to start a star gazing session, so we hit the rack.       

On July 23, 2022 at 8:32 AM Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Yes, we had a good evening. I compared Mark's Takahashi 3.3mm TOE to my 3.4mm Vixen HR eyepiece and the Takahashi has a slightly larger field at 50° as opposed to 42° but as far as  sharpness goes I saw no difference. The Vixen is disconnected, too bad. I bought the whole set when they came out. Thanks Barry Ferrell for telling me about them years ago. Has he ever used his? Of course not!

 

Barry took delivery of a new Celestron 10" Dobsonian with plate solving Star Sense but he hasn't opened the box yet. No surprise there.

 

David, you should bring over your 80mm one night and join us for double star observing.

 

Kent


On Jul 23, 2022, at 8:22 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Well we had a pretty good session. Most of the night was fairly clear with passing clouds that finally built up to a full blanket around 2330 (1130 pm for recidivists).

 

We has a smorgasbord of objects last night, doubles, opens, planetaries. oh my. 

 

Kent and I saw a couple of nice doubles then we wandered over to Ophiucus to look at a bright planetary. At 600 something power it appeared to be very elongated like a...........how you say in these country... football. We could also make out an outer envelope but no central star. We observed it in the 6 inch and the 5 inch. Who says a 1.6mm eyepiece cannot be used? You just need tracking.

 

Kent started to look at open clusters. This is odd as normally they are not the prime dish on his menu. We looked at M-11. I looked at it in quite a few powers and frankly this object, really in many ways, is much better at low power where it just shines. I have noticed that globulars and tight star clusters take on a distinct shiny appearance at low powers. I call this viewing in context. It really is the nicest way to appreciate the beauty of these objects. That shine effect tends to disappear with more power and close examination. Kent found a 0.9 double that was fun to do in his 6. I found a 1.8 with a three magnitude difference. I was going to shoot at a 12.7 magnitude star but somehow the clouds had moved in by 1130 and put an end to that show. 

 

Roy I hope you get lots of opens with your new scope.

 

We discussed my budget and all the things Kent and Roy have generously ordered for me. With that big reflector on the list we are well north of 1 million dollars now COD. I just want to thank you all for your support. I could not have achieved this milestone without you help.

 

In short "I owe you"

 

This has been one very long hot spell. I think we were very lucky to have had a couple of good decades in excellent conditions for observing. I make no predictions for the future.

 

As a closing remark, have you noticed that the smaller pair of the double double is distinctly of a different color?

 

 


 

 


Ted Forte
 

I just checked, you can find it on line if you dig.  I bought a bottle years ago when our town still had a photography shop. He had to call around and order it, but got it for me.  I shared it with my club and still have a good bit in the bottle (long expired – it does have a shelf life).   I mixed up Dr. Clay’s cleaning solution and used it a couple of times, but as I mentioned earlier, I’m now in the habit of using no soap at all. Just distilled water.

 

For eyepieces I use Zeiss lens cleaning wipes but I’ve also used the cleaning solution that the optical shop gives out for glasses. I spray it onto a lint free cloth to wipe the lens after blowing it off with a rubber bulb and sweeping with a lens brush.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2022 7:38 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Fw: Last night observing

 

Yes, Kodak Photo-Flo.  Since film photography is nearly extinct there may not be many sources for this stuff.  And only a very tiny amount is used for mirror washing.  I’m not recommending it, but I remembered where I saw it: Dr. Clay’s optics cleaning recipe –

 

 

Roy



On Jul 26, 2022, at 7:26 AM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:



photo flow

 

On Monday, July 25, 2022 at 11:03:19 PM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:

 

 

I’ll just say that my reason for using paper towels after the final rinse of my mirrors is to avoid water spots.  Those spots can be maddening after a careful mirror cleaning.  As has been said, the towels are very gently applied with no rubbing, and simply soak up any water droplets, leaving very little moisture.  This has worked well on my mirrors for decades.  But I have seen other methods – there is a darkroom photo chemical (I forget the name) that prevents spots, but of course a few paper towels are more available, almost zero cost, and no chemicals to mix.

 

Roy



On Jul 25, 2022, at 10:12 PM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:



Sure. Actually there are two separate techniques for eyepieces and mirrors. Now I am not the be all and end all of how to do it so this is just my experience.

 

Eyepieces: My favorite method is using a product from Edmond Optics called Tech Spec.This is a professional optics cleaning liquid. Comes in a spray bottle. It is expensive but you don't need much so it lasts for a long time. I have two bottles that have gone for over three years. I use this with a lens cleaning cloth. I spray the Tech Spec on the cloth and not the lens. You don't want to get fluid between elements. I fold the cloth and gently wipe the face of the optics. If there is any dust or dirt gently brush off with a camera brush before using the cloth. Celestron makes a nice cleaning pen/brush that does a good job of this. (Don't use canned air. If the propellant gets out it can damage the coatings) If you have a bad oil spot that the Tech Spec cannot get at you can use charcoal lighter fluid like you buy in the store for cook outs. This is food grade and will remove the hardest stuff without damaging the coatings. Takahashi recommends this for bad spots that resist anything else.

 

 

Mirrors: This is where the Dawn comes in. Clean the mirror of dust or solid particles. Use a mixture of dawn/distilled water. Some throw alchohol into the mix. There are several way to mix this.gently wash the mirror and rinse with distilled water and allow to dry by placing paper towels on the mirror. Don't rub the mirror with the towels paper is very abrasive. It can damage the coatings or worse the reflective surface. Roy may have more to say about this. Usually clean the mirror outside the scope.

 

Best philosophy. Keep it clean and clean it only at a minimum. Never look at it at night with your red flashlight that way lies madness!

 

On Monday, July 25, 2022 at 08:43:01 PM EDT, Patrick Vartuli <pvartuli@...> wrote:

 

 

I would be interested in learning the secrets of cleaning the mirror and possibly an eyepiece.  I can bring the Dawn.  Thanks for the link Mark.

On Mon, Jul 25, 2022, 10:42 AM jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

 

 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>

To: Kathlene Wright <kd3wright@...>; kent@... <kent@...>

Cc: Roy Diffrient <mail@...>

Sent: Monday, July 25, 2022 at 10:40:51 AM EDT

Subject: Re: Last night observing

 

That's a pretty good method. Yes the thin wall of the tube can be a bit of problem getting the cell back in though not a major one. I have a secret...............................there are two Dawn formulas that act totally different!

 

A lot of the old advise for using dawn to clean birds and telescopic mirrors was written years ago when it was a different formula that the current issue of Dawn. I had heard from an old sea captain that if you had an oil spill you first put Dawn in the water and that drew the slick together. I doubted that so I did a bench test in a bucket and the Dawn just spread the mess out making it worse.

 

I found a source of the old Dawn detergent and lo and behold he was correct. There is a difference. It can be had at amazon for a bit of cost. Might be worth buying a couple to use for those mirror cleanings. The key word is "non concentrate". The stuff you now buy at the store (concentrated) is not as good for this.

 

 

Dawn Non Concentrated Original Dishwashing Liquid, 12.6 Fluid Ounce 3 pe...

Dawn Non Concentrated Original Dishwashing Liquid, 12.6 Fluid Ounce pack of 3 bottles

 

 

 

 

On Sunday, July 24, 2022 at 11:26:24 AM EDT, kent@... <kent@...> wrote:

 

 

I’ll gladly help clean the mirror if you need help. It’s a real bitch to get the cell back in the thin-walled Orion steel tube. Other than that, it’s pretty easy. Once out of the mirror cell, I run distilled water  over the mirror. While the water is running. I use a drop of Dawn detergent and swirl it around with the palm of my hand.

 

Then I rinse with distilled water, and rinse again. After all soap is removed I lay the mirror face up on a table and use a trick Roy taught me decades ago. I lay several layers of Bounty paper towels over the surface and TAP it dry. Never, ever rub the surface.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Kathlene Wright
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 11:19 AM
To: Kent Blackwell; Mark Ost
Cc: Roy Diffrient
Subject: Re: Last night observing

 

Yep, I can bring my 80mm one evening this week or next.  I'll just skip swimming the next morning. 

My 10" hasn't been spot on when navigating..... I've been having to do a little searching for my targets.  I find them, but with some effort.  Then it dawned on me, my finder scope is out of kilter.  It needs to be resynced with the telescope.  So now it's time to do some maintenance.  I need to install a new o-ring on the finder scope OTA anyway. 

And, I'll clean the mirror.  I'm going to get a couple of gallons of demineralized water.... we have well water.  Not good for optics.  I'm going to remove the whole mirror assembly.  I'll mark the screw hole orientation with a piece of painter's tape.  I'll check the collimation after reinstallation.  Should be good to go for another year.  It's a really nice telescope.

My sister and niece were in Williamsburg yesterday, so we went to visit them.  Got home around 11 last night.  Too late to start a star gazing session, so we hit the rack.       

On July 23, 2022 at 8:32 AM Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Yes, we had a good evening. I compared Mark's Takahashi 3.3mm TOE to my 3.4mm Vixen HR eyepiece and the Takahashi has a slightly larger field at 50° as opposed to 42° but as far as  sharpness goes I saw no difference. The Vixen is disconnected, too bad. I bought the whole set when they came out. Thanks Barry Ferrell for telling me about them years ago. Has he ever used his? Of course not!

 

Barry took delivery of a new Celestron 10" Dobsonian with plate solving Star Sense but he hasn't opened the box yet. No surprise there.

 

David, you should bring over your 80mm one night and join us for double star observing.

 

Kent


On Jul 23, 2022, at 8:22 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Well we had a pretty good session. Most of the night was fairly clear with passing clouds that finally built up to a full blanket around 2330 (1130 pm for recidivists).

 

We has a smorgasbord of objects last night, doubles, opens, planetaries. oh my. 

 

Kent and I saw a couple of nice doubles then we wandered over to Ophiucus to look at a bright planetary. At 600 something power it appeared to be very elongated like a...........how you say in these country... football. We could also make out an outer envelope but no central star. We observed it in the 6 inch and the 5 inch. Who says a 1.6mm eyepiece cannot be used? You just need tracking.

 

Kent started to look at open clusters. This is odd as normally they are not the prime dish on his menu. We looked at M-11. I looked at it in quite a few powers and frankly this object, really in many ways, is much better at low power where it just shines. I have noticed that globulars and tight star clusters take on a distinct shiny appearance at low powers. I call this viewing in context. It really is the nicest way to appreciate the beauty of these objects. That shine effect tends to disappear with more power and close examination. Kent found a 0.9 double that was fun to do in his 6. I found a 1.8 with a three magnitude difference. I was going to shoot at a 12.7 magnitude star but somehow the clouds had moved in by 1130 and put an end to that show. 

 

Roy I hope you get lots of opens with your new scope.

 

We discussed my budget and all the things Kent and Roy have generously ordered for me. With that big reflector on the list we are well north of 1 million dollars now COD. I just want to thank you all for your support. I could not have achieved this milestone without you help.

 

In short "I owe you"

 

This has been one very long hot spell. I think we were very lucky to have had a couple of good decades in excellent conditions for observing. I make no predictions for the future.

 

As a closing remark, have you noticed that the smaller pair of the double double is distinctly of a different color?

 

 


 

 


Kent Blackwell
 

I'm with Ted on this, I rarely use detergent; just spray on distilled water. That usually cleans the mirror sufficiently. 


Kent Blackwell
 

Mark, speaking of Edmund Lens Cleaner. My bottle was purchased in 1996 so how's that for longevity? It only takes a drop to clean lenses. I've always recommended this fluid. It's better than the old Kodak lens fluid, better than Zeiss eyeglass fluid, better than Orion's lens cleaner. It's simply the best lens cleaner I've ever used. Al Nagler used to like Acetone but it scares me!


jimcoble2000
 

Me too

On Tuesday, July 26, 2022 at 11:19:18 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


Mark, speaking of Edmund Lens Cleaner. My bottle was purchased in 1996 so how's that for longevity? It only takes a drop to clean lenses. I've always recommended this fluid. It's better than the old Kodak lens fluid, better than Zeiss eyeglass fluid, better than Orion's lens cleaner. It's simply the best lens cleaner I've ever used. Al Nagler used to like Acetone but it scares me!


Shawn Loescher
 

Years ago I followed Chuck Jagow document where he listed the formula mentioned by Roy above. I have plenty of the Kodiak photo flow left still. Tomorrow I'm helping Gabriel clean his mirror. I'll let you know if the "expiration date" matters when we're done. I'm guessing it will be fine.


Kent Blackwell
 

  Shawn, I assume you have cleaned your Orion Dobsonian mirror before and know to be sure to mark the tube which mirror cell screw goes where. The cell has to go back in the same orientation. 

Let me know how many fingers you pinch trying to get that cell back in.   I think I’m up to 10 through the years with the Orion 10” Dobsonian!


Shawn Loescher
 

Yes sir! I have the fingernail polish ready to go. :)