Do you remember March 7?


Kent Blackwell
 

If you're one of the older folks in the club how could you possibly forget March 7, 1970 the day of the center path of totality of the sun traversed through the middle of our town? I viewed it from Rudee Inlet at the Virginia Beach Oceanfront with a 8" f/7 Optical Craftsmen Newtonian telescope on a Cave Optical Co. equatorial mount. And what a fine telescope that was, too. I was too naïve at the time to know just how good the mirror in that telescope was. However, I shall never forget the view of a totally eclipsed sun on a perfectly clear sky day. After witnessing such a spectacle it became a lifelong challenge to follow total eclipses around the world. 

Kent Blackwell


Bird Taylor
 

Hey Kent,

My dad took us three kids to watch it on the oceanfront. I loved watching the birds as the sunlight dimmed and later brightened.

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Mar 7, 2021, at 15:09 00, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

If you're one of the older folks in the club how could you possibly forget March 7, 1970 the day of the center path of totality of the sun traversed through the middle of our town? I viewed it from Rudee Inlet at the Virginia Beach Oceanfront with a 8" f/7 Optical Craftsmen Newtonian telescope on a Cave Optical Co. equatorial mount. And what a fine telescope that was, too. I was too naïve at the time to know just how good the mirror in that telescope was. However, I shall never forget the view of a totally eclipsed sun on a perfectly clear sky day. After witnessing such a spectacle it became a lifelong challenge to follow total eclipses around the world. 

Kent Blackwell


Matthew Cook
 

An Umbraphile?


On Mar 7, 2021, at 15:09, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

If you're one of the older folks in the club how could you possibly forget March 7, 1970 the day of the center path of totality of the sun traversed through the middle of our town? I viewed it from Rudee Inlet at the Virginia Beach Oceanfront with a 8" f/7 Optical Craftsmen Newtonian telescope on a Cave Optical Co. equatorial mount. And what a fine telescope that was, too. I was too naïve at the time to know just how good the mirror in that telescope was. However, I shall never forget the view of a totally eclipsed sun on a perfectly clear sky day. After witnessing such a spectacle it became a lifelong challenge to follow total eclipses around the world. 

Kent Blackwell


jimcoble2000
 

You don't know the half of it! This boy was eat up.

PS Thanks George and Chuck. Last night was fun as long as it lasted. I wish Chuck the best of luck on the move to BBAA Rocky Mountain Branch.

On Sunday, March 7, 2021, 4:17:08 PM EST, Matthew Cook via groups.io <lt_mrcook@...> wrote:


An Umbraphile?


On Mar 7, 2021, at 15:09, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

If you're one of the older folks in the club how could you possibly forget March 7, 1970 the day of the center path of totality of the sun traversed through the middle of our town? I viewed it from Rudee Inlet at the Virginia Beach Oceanfront with a 8" f/7 Optical Craftsmen Newtonian telescope on a Cave Optical Co. equatorial mount. And what a fine telescope that was, too. I was too naïve at the time to know just how good the mirror in that telescope was. However, I shall never forget the view of a totally eclipsed sun on a perfectly clear sky day. After witnessing such a spectacle it became a lifelong challenge to follow total eclipses around the world. 

Kent Blackwell


jimcoble2000
 

Is that where the "Bird" moniker comes from?Emoji

On Sunday, March 7, 2021, 3:54:30 PM EST, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


Hey Kent,

My dad took us three kids to watch it on the oceanfront. I loved watching the birds as the sunlight dimmed and later brightened.

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Mar 7, 2021, at 15:09 00, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

If you're one of the older folks in the club how could you possibly forget March 7, 1970 the day of the center path of totality of the sun traversed through the middle of our town? I viewed it from Rudee Inlet at the Virginia Beach Oceanfront with a 8" f/7 Optical Craftsmen Newtonian telescope on a Cave Optical Co. equatorial mount. And what a fine telescope that was, too. I was too naïve at the time to know just how good the mirror in that telescope was. However, I shall never forget the view of a totally eclipsed sun on a perfectly clear sky day. After witnessing such a spectacle it became a lifelong challenge to follow total eclipses around the world. 

Kent Blackwell


Jonathan Scheetz
 

I remember being on the field near the track at Plaza Junior High in Virginia Beach.  We observed by poking a pin hole in a piece of cardboard and projecting the image onto another piece of white cardboard.  There was a big crowd of people there and it was a real party atmosphere to the event.  It was pretty cool.


Bird Taylor
 

Hey Mark,


No, I'm very nearsighted... -18 diopters. When we moved from the California desert to the Virginia coast when I was thirteen, I had to wear my glasses instead of my preferred contact lenses until new ones could be made. Classmates would tease me with typical nicknames like Coke bottles and four eyes. Charlie Brown, Snoopy, and Woodstock were very popular comic characters way back then. Well, a good buddy took notice on how small my eyes looked due to my VERY thick glasses, and came up with Birdie in reference to Woodstock's pin-point eyes and the fact that I loved making and flying model airplanes and rockets. Since I'm also the third with my family name, I'd had many nicknames my whole life up to that point, and I loved my new name: Birdie. Fast forward to adulthood, marriage, and professional life, where I shortened it to Bird. My wife, Judy, thought that it would sound more professional... tee-tee.


So to finally answer your question, Mark, no, but "Birdie" was given to me at that time. Sorry for the long answer, AstroBuddy.


Clear Dark Skies,

Bird

On March 8, 2021 at 8:09 AM "jimcoble2000 via groups.io" <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

 
Is that where the "Bird" moniker comes from? Emoji

On Sunday, March 7, 2021, 3:54:30 PM EST, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


Hey Kent,

My dad took us three kids to watch it on the oceanfront. I loved watching the birds as the sunlight dimmed and later brightened.

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Mar 7, 2021, at 15:09 00, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

If you're one of the older folks in the club how could you possibly forget March 7, 1970 the day of the center path of totality of the sun traversed through the middle of our town? I viewed it from Rudee Inlet at the Virginia Beach Oceanfront with a 8" f/7 Optical Craftsmen Newtonian telescope on a Cave Optical Co. equatorial mount. And what a fine telescope that was, too. I was too naïve at the time to know just how good the mirror in that telescope was. However, I shall never forget the view of a totally eclipsed sun on a perfectly clear sky day. After witnessing such a spectacle it became a lifelong challenge to follow total eclipses around the world. 

Kent Blackwell

 


 


 


jimcoble2000
 

No need to apologize. Inquiring minds want to know!

On Monday, March 8, 2021, 12:25:07 PM EST, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


Hey Mark,


No, I'm very nearsighted... -18 diopters. When we moved from the California desert to the Virginia coast when I was thirteen, I had to wear my glasses instead of my preferred contact lenses until new ones could be made. Classmates would tease me with typical nicknames like Coke bottles and four eyes. Charlie Brown, Snoopy, and Woodstock were very popular comic characters way back then. Well, a good buddy took notice on how small my eyes looked due to my VERY thick glasses, and came up with Birdie in reference to Woodstock's pin-point eyes and the fact that I loved making and flying model airplanes and rockets. Since I'm also the third with my family name, I'd had many nicknames my whole life up to that point, and I loved my new name: Birdie. Fast forward to adulthood, marriage, and professional life, where I shortened it to Bird. My wife, Judy, thought that it would sound more professional... tee-tee.


So to finally answer your question, Mark, no, but "Birdie" was given to me at that time. Sorry for the long answer, AstroBuddy.


Clear Dark Skies,

Bird

On March 8, 2021 at 8:09 AM "jimcoble2000 via groups.io" <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

 
Is that where the "Bird" moniker comes from? Emoji

On Sunday, March 7, 2021, 3:54:30 PM EST, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


Hey Kent,

My dad took us three kids to watch it on the oceanfront. I loved watching the birds as the sunlight dimmed and later brightened.

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Mar 7, 2021, at 15:09 00, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

If you're one of the older folks in the club how could you possibly forget March 7, 1970 the day of the center path of totality of the sun traversed through the middle of our town? I viewed it from Rudee Inlet at the Virginia Beach Oceanfront with a 8" f/7 Optical Craftsmen Newtonian telescope on a Cave Optical Co. equatorial mount. And what a fine telescope that was, too. I was too naïve at the time to know just how good the mirror in that telescope was. However, I shall never forget the view of a totally eclipsed sun on a perfectly clear sky day. After witnessing such a spectacle it became a lifelong challenge to follow total eclipses around the world. 

Kent Blackwell

 


 


 


George Reynolds
 

Kent,

In March 1970 I was stationed at Fort Lewis, Washington, so I missed the East Coast eclipse.  At that time I was also getting ready for my wedding in April to Miss Linda Montgomery.  We are together and still in love with each other almost 51 years later.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Sunday, March 7, 2021, 03:09:02 PM EST, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


If you're one of the older folks in the club how could you possibly forget March 7, 1970 the day of the center path of totality of the sun traversed through the middle of our town? I viewed it from Rudee Inlet at the Virginia Beach Oceanfront with a 8" f/7 Optical Craftsmen Newtonian telescope on a Cave Optical Co. equatorial mount. And what a fine telescope that was, too. I was too naïve at the time to know just how good the mirror in that telescope was. However, I shall never forget the view of a totally eclipsed sun on a perfectly clear sky day. After witnessing such a spectacle it became a lifelong challenge to follow total eclipses around the world. 

Kent Blackwell


George Reynolds
 

Bird,

I can identify with your nicknames.  I too am very nearsighted, and wore thick glasses until 9th grade, when I got contact lenses.  My best friend and nextdoor neighbor "Butch" gave me several nicknames, including "Specs", "Four-Eyes", "Goggles", and because I was a good student and good in school, "Birdbrain", which he later shortened to "Birdie".  None of those nicknames stuck though.  Today my nickname is "Star Geezer".

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Monday, March 8, 2021, 12:25:08 PM EST, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


Hey Mark,


No, I'm very nearsighted... -18 diopters. When we moved from the California desert to the Virginia coast when I was thirteen, I had to wear my glasses instead of my preferred contact lenses until new ones could be made. Classmates would tease me with typical nicknames like Coke bottles and four eyes. Charlie Brown, Snoopy, and Woodstock were very popular comic characters way back then. Well, a good buddy took notice on how small my eyes looked due to my VERY thick glasses, and came up with Birdie in reference to Woodstock's pin-point eyes and the fact that I loved making and flying model airplanes and rockets. Since I'm also the third with my family name, I'd had many nicknames my whole life up to that point, and I loved my new name: Birdie. Fast forward to adulthood, marriage, and professional life, where I shortened it to Bird. My wife, Judy, thought that it would sound more professional... tee-tee.


So to finally answer your question, Mark, no, but "Birdie" was given to me at that time. Sorry for the long answer, AstroBuddy.


Clear Dark Skies,

Bird

On March 8, 2021 at 8:09 AM "jimcoble2000 via groups.io" <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

 
Is that where the "Bird" moniker comes from? Emoji

On Sunday, March 7, 2021, 3:54:30 PM EST, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


Hey Kent,

My dad took us three kids to watch it on the oceanfront. I loved watching the birds as the sunlight dimmed and later brightened.

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Mar 7, 2021, at 15:09 00, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

If you're one of the older folks in the club how could you possibly forget March 7, 1970 the day of the center path of totality of the sun traversed through the middle of our town? I viewed it from Rudee Inlet at the Virginia Beach Oceanfront with a 8" f/7 Optical Craftsmen Newtonian telescope on a Cave Optical Co. equatorial mount. And what a fine telescope that was, too. I was too naïve at the time to know just how good the mirror in that telescope was. However, I shall never forget the view of a totally eclipsed sun on a perfectly clear sky day. After witnessing such a spectacle it became a lifelong challenge to follow total eclipses around the world. 

Kent Blackwell

 


 


 


George Reynolds
 

Hey Bird, I just saw this email from back in March,  I too had some of the nicknames you had.  I am also very nearsighted, and have worn glasses since the second grade.  My best friend gave me the nicknames "four-eyes", "specs", and "goggles".  Later, because I was a "brain" in school, he gave me the nickname "birdbrain", which later got shortened to "birdie".  None of those nicknames ever stuck, though, like yours did.

George



George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Monday, March 8, 2021, 12:25:08 PM EST, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


Hey Mark,


No, I'm very nearsighted... -18 diopters. When we moved from the California desert to the Virginia coast when I was thirteen, I had to wear my glasses instead of my preferred contact lenses until new ones could be made. Classmates would tease me with typical nicknames like Coke bottles and four eyes. Charlie Brown, Snoopy, and Woodstock were very popular comic characters way back then. Well, a good buddy took notice on how small my eyes looked due to my VERY thick glasses, and came up with Birdie in reference to Woodstock's pin-point eyes and the fact that I loved making and flying model airplanes and rockets. Since I'm also the third with my family name, I'd had many nicknames my whole life up to that point, and I loved my new name: Birdie. Fast forward to adulthood, marriage, and professional life, where I shortened it to Bird. My wife, Judy, thought that it would sound more professional... tee-tee.


So to finally answer your question, Mark, no, but "Birdie" was given to me at that time. Sorry for the long answer, AstroBuddy.


Clear Dark Skies,

Bird

On March 8, 2021 at 8:09 AM "jimcoble2000 via groups.io" <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

 
Is that where the "Bird" moniker comes from? Emoji

On Sunday, March 7, 2021, 3:54:30 PM EST, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


Hey Kent,

My dad took us three kids to watch it on the oceanfront. I loved watching the birds as the sunlight dimmed and later brightened.

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Mar 7, 2021, at 15:09 00, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

If you're one of the older folks in the club how could you possibly forget March 7, 1970 the day of the center path of totality of the sun traversed through the middle of our town? I viewed it from Rudee Inlet at the Virginia Beach Oceanfront with a 8" f/7 Optical Craftsmen Newtonian telescope on a Cave Optical Co. equatorial mount. And what a fine telescope that was, too. I was too naïve at the time to know just how good the mirror in that telescope was. However, I shall never forget the view of a totally eclipsed sun on a perfectly clear sky day. After witnessing such a spectacle it became a lifelong challenge to follow total eclipses around the world. 

Kent Blackwell