Current Comets


Kent Blackwell
 

Because trees obscured my western view I didn't get to see it when it
brightened higher than 6th magnitude. If you didn't see it either
don't despair, there are several nice comets to view this month. Here
are their position this Friday evening, which is BBAA's Skywatch
night. I shall list them in order of RA:

154P/Brewington
Psc
00h 19m
+12 34', 11.9 magnitude

C/2001 HT 50
Monoceros
06h 41m
+02 18, 11.5 magnitude

C/2001 RX 14 (LINEAR)
UMa
11h 50m
+41 06, 10.7 magnitude

C2002 Y1
Draco
19h 36 +
+60 56' 8.1 mangnitude

Good luck. At least one of these should be visible with moderate
binoculars.

Kent Blackwell


Kent Blackwell
 

By the comet referred to as "it" in my last backbayastro post, I was of
course speaking of Comet C/2002 V1 (NEAT). For those who don't know, the
names LINEAR, NEAT, etc. are the names of the satellite which discovered the
comet. Real people who discover comets have their names assigned to comets
as well, but their names are not listed in all caps; these caps are
abbreviations for the satellite's full name.

Isn't a comet more interesting when a human being discovered it? You know,
it used to be a real challenge to discover a comet, now with all those
searching satellites out there it's nearly impossible. I guess the
satellites requires less sleep than we so they have more viewing hours.

Kent

----- Original Message -----
From: <kent@exis.net>
To: <backbayastro@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, February 18, 2003 2:49 PM
Subject: [backbayastro] Current Comets


Because trees obscured my western view I didn't get to see it when it
brightened higher than 6th magnitude. If you didn't see it either
don't despair, there are several nice comets to view this month. Here
are their position this Friday evening, which is BBAA's Skywatch
night. I shall list them in order of RA:

154P/Brewington
Psc
00h 19m
+12 34', 11.9 magnitude

C/2001 HT 50
Monoceros
06h 41m
+02 18, 11.5 magnitude

C/2001 RX 14 (LINEAR)
UMa
11h 50m
+41 06, 10.7 magnitude

C2002 Y1
Draco
19h 36 +
+60 56' 8.1 mangnitude

Good luck. At least one of these should be visible with moderate
binoculars.

Kent Blackwell











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Rick Bish <2bookworms@cox.net> <2bookworms@...>
 

Hey Kent,
My name is Rick. I joined the BBAA in November and am still learning
some of the terminology. You and I have actually never met, but I did
have a question about the terms "Right Ascension and Declination."
The reason I'm asking you, is because you used those terms in you're
note about current comets.
At the end of the note, I was unable to imagine where those comets
would be (not your fault at all).
I've taken a couple of college astronomy courses and that's one thing
I needed more time to understand. I've heard lot of "sage" scientists
and astronomy people using those terms.
Could you (or anyone out there in BBAA Land, for that matter!)explain
the terms "Right Ascension and Declination" as if you were explaining
them to a 10-year-old? How do I find celestial objects this way?
Thanks!

Rick Bish


Kent Blackwell
 

Hello Rick. Think of Right Ascension and Declination this way. When we draw
a map of the earth we use latitude and longitude lines. This greatly
assists in finding an accurate location. The same is done in the sky. We
draw imaginary lines across the sky. Those line running north and south are
called RA, or Right Ascension. Lines running east and west are DEC, or
declination. If you look at any detailed map of the sky you'll see these
marked on sky maps. I suggest you go to a library or bookstore near you and
see if any books are offered with good sky maps.

A couple of especially good star atlases for beginners are listed below. I
doubt you'll find either at a library or any local bookstores, but each can
be ordered. The Edmund is especially recommended for a beginner, and besides
the star maps is crammed with much useful information. It's beautifully
written by the late Sam Brown in the 1950s. In the late 1970s it was updated
by Terence Dickinson, and again in the late 1990s. I still refer to mine and
I've been observing more years than I care to remember.

Kent Blackwell

The Edmund Mag 5 Star Atlas
ID30091-18 $6.95
www.scientificsonlin.com
800-728-6999

Wil Tirion's Bright Star Atlas 2000
@$10
Wilmann-Bell
Richmond, VA
www.willbell.com
804-320-7016

----- Original Message -----
From: <2bookworms@cox.net>
To: <backbayastro@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2003 9:19 PM
Subject: [backbayastro] Re: Current Comets


Hey Kent,
My name is Rick. I joined the BBAA in November and am still learning
some of the terminology. You and I have actually never met, but I did
have a question about the terms "Right Ascension and Declination."
The reason I'm asking you, is because you used those terms in you're
note about current comets.
At the end of the note, I was unable to imagine where those comets
would be (not your fault at all).
I've taken a couple of college astronomy courses and that's one thing
I needed more time to understand. I've heard lot of "sage" scientists
and astronomy people using those terms.
Could you (or anyone out there in BBAA Land, for that matter!)explain
the terms "Right Ascension and Declination" as if you were explaining
them to a 10-year-old? How do I find celestial objects this way?
Thanks!

Rick Bish


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backbayastro-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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Woody, Denice K <denice.k.woody@...>
 

And a trick I use to remember which is which is Declination is when you're
laying down flat and Right Ascension is ascending upwards towards the
sky.....

-----Original Message-----
From: S. Kent Blackwell [mailto:kent@exis.net]
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2003 9:52 AM
To: backbayastro@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [backbayastro] Re: Current Comets

Hello Rick. Think of Right Ascension and Declination this way. When we draw
a map of the earth we use latitude and longitude lines. This greatly
assists in finding an accurate location. The same is done in the sky. We
draw imaginary lines across the sky. Those line running north and south are
called RA, or Right Ascension. Lines running east and west are DEC, or
declination. If you look at any detailed map of the sky you'll see these
marked on sky maps. I suggest you go to a library or bookstore near you and
see if any books are offered with good sky maps.

A couple of especially good star atlases for beginners are listed below. I
doubt you'll find either at a library or any local bookstores, but each can
be ordered. The Edmund is especially recommended for a beginner, and besides
the star maps is crammed with much useful information. It's beautifully
written by the late Sam Brown in the 1950s. In the late 1970s it was updated
by Terence Dickinson, and again in the late 1990s. I still refer to mine and
I've been observing more years than I care to remember.

Kent Blackwell

The Edmund Mag 5 Star Atlas
ID30091-18 $6.95
www.scientificsonlin.com
800-728-6999

Wil Tirion's Bright Star Atlas 2000
@$10
Wilmann-Bell
Richmond, VA
www.willbell.com
804-320-7016

----- Original Message -----
From: <2bookworms@cox.net>
To: <backbayastro@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2003 9:19 PM
Subject: [backbayastro] Re: Current Comets


Hey Kent,
My name is Rick. I joined the BBAA in November and am still learning
some of the terminology. You and I have actually never met, but I did
have a question about the terms "Right Ascension and Declination."
The reason I'm asking you, is because you used those terms in you're
note about current comets.
At the end of the note, I was unable to imagine where those comets
would be (not your fault at all).
I've taken a couple of college astronomy courses and that's one thing
I needed more time to understand. I've heard lot of "sage" scientists
and astronomy people using those terms.
Could you (or anyone out there in BBAA Land, for that matter!)explain
the terms "Right Ascension and Declination" as if you were explaining
them to a 10-year-old? How do I find celestial objects this way?
Thanks!

Rick Bish


To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
backbayastro-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
backbayastro-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/