Apollo 15


Roy Diffrient
 

Fifty years ago today, on July 30, 1971, Apollo 15 landed on the moon.  

It was the fourth manned lunar landing but the very first to include a car.  Amazing but true.  It was folded-up and attached to a stronger version of the Lunar Module for the trip to the moon.  The Lunar Roving Vehicle, or LRV in NASA-speak, gave the lunar astronauts (David Scott and James Irwin) wheels, greatly improving their mobility and extending their exploration range.  I remember that they also had lots of fun driving it around like a dune buggy.  They traveled about 17 miles during their stay of almost 3 days on the moon.  The battery-powered buggy was a great success, and NASA also included it on Apollo 16 and 17, the two remaining manned moon missions.

The camera on the LRV allowed us to see for the first time the launch of the Ascent Stage of the Lunar Module when the astronauts left the moon on the journey home.

Also for the first time, this mission launched a separate satellite into lunar orbit.  The Particles and Fields sub-satellite was spring-launched from the Service Module just before the astronauts left lunar orbit for earth.

Those were the days – Much more info in NASA’s mission summary here:


Roy


jimcoble2000
 

Halcyon days. You need to see the movie "Ad Astra" They have rovers too.......................and guns.

Speaking of. I took my first trip in the car today. No problem. First time I have driven without glasses in my life. Nice day for it. I dedicate my trip to Apollo15

On Friday, July 30, 2021, 12:53:04 PM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Fifty years ago today, on July 30, 1971, Apollo 15 landed on the moon.  

It was the fourth manned lunar landing but the very first to include a car.  Amazing but true.  It was folded-up and attached to a stronger version of the Lunar Module for the trip to the moon.  The Lunar Roving Vehicle, or LRV in NASA-speak, gave the lunar astronauts (David Scott and James Irwin) wheels, greatly improving their mobility and extending their exploration range.  I remember that they also had lots of fun driving it around like a dune buggy.  They traveled about 17 miles during their stay of almost 3 days on the moon.  The battery-powered buggy was a great success, and NASA also included it on Apollo 16 and 17, the two remaining manned moon missions.

The camera on the LRV allowed us to see for the first time the launch of the Ascent Stage of the Lunar Module when the astronauts left the moon on the journey home.

Also for the first time, this mission launched a separate satellite into lunar orbit.  The Particles and Fields sub-satellite was spring-launched from the Service Module just before the astronauts left lunar orbit for earth.

Those were the days – Much more info in NASA’s mission summary here:


Roy


Jim Tallman
 

Ummm.. are you allowed to say 'guns" any more?
              - Thought Police 😎

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


George Reynolds
 

Mark, why are you driving around without glasses?

George


On Fri, Jul 30, 2021 at 15:00, jimcoble2000 via groups.io
<jimcoble2000@...> wrote:
Halcyon days. You need to see the movie "Ad Astra" They have rovers too.......................and guns.

Speaking of. I took my first trip in the car today. No problem. First time I have driven without glasses in my life. Nice day for it. I dedicate my trip to Apollo15

On Friday, July 30, 2021, 12:53:04 PM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Fifty years ago today, on July 30, 1971, Apollo 15 landed on the moon.  

It was the fourth manned lunar landing but the very first to include a car.  Amazing but true.  It was folded-up and attached to a stronger version of the Lunar Module for the trip to the moon.  The Lunar Roving Vehicle, or LRV in NASA-speak, gave the lunar astronauts (David Scott and James Irwin) wheels, greatly improving their mobility and extending their exploration range.  I remember that they also had lots of fun driving it around like a dune buggy.  They traveled about 17 miles during their stay of almost 3 days on the moon.  The battery-powered buggy was a great success, and NASA also included it on Apollo 16 and 17, the two remaining manned moon missions.

The camera on the LRV allowed us to see for the first time the launch of the Ascent Stage of the Lunar Module when the astronauts left the moon on the journey home.

Also for the first time, this mission launched a separate satellite into lunar orbit.  The Particles and Fields sub-satellite was spring-launched from the Service Module just before the astronauts left lunar orbit for earth.

Those were the days – Much more info in NASA’s mission summary here:


Roy


jimcoble2000
 

cataract surgery

On Saturday, July 31, 2021, 4:38:25 PM EDT, George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...> wrote:


Mark, why are you driving around without glasses?

George


On Fri, Jul 30, 2021 at 15:00, jimcoble2000 via groups.io
<jimcoble2000@...> wrote:
Halcyon days. You need to see the movie "Ad Astra" They have rovers too.......................and guns.

Speaking of. I took my first trip in the car today. No problem. First time I have driven without glasses in my life. Nice day for it. I dedicate my trip to Apollo15

On Friday, July 30, 2021, 12:53:04 PM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Fifty years ago today, on July 30, 1971, Apollo 15 landed on the moon.  

It was the fourth manned lunar landing but the very first to include a car.  Amazing but true.  It was folded-up and attached to a stronger version of the Lunar Module for the trip to the moon.  The Lunar Roving Vehicle, or LRV in NASA-speak, gave the lunar astronauts (David Scott and James Irwin) wheels, greatly improving their mobility and extending their exploration range.  I remember that they also had lots of fun driving it around like a dune buggy.  They traveled about 17 miles during their stay of almost 3 days on the moon.  The battery-powered buggy was a great success, and NASA also included it on Apollo 16 and 17, the two remaining manned moon missions.

The camera on the LRV allowed us to see for the first time the launch of the Ascent Stage of the Lunar Module when the astronauts left the moon on the journey home.

Also for the first time, this mission launched a separate satellite into lunar orbit.  The Particles and Fields sub-satellite was spring-launched from the Service Module just before the astronauts left lunar orbit for earth.

Those were the days – Much more info in NASA’s mission summary here:


Roy


George Reynolds
 

Right!  How has it affected your ability to do astronomy observing? 

I need to get that done, too.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Saturday, July 31, 2021, 05:44:43 PM EDT, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


cataract surgery

On Saturday, July 31, 2021, 4:38:25 PM EDT, George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...> wrote:


Mark, why are you driving around without glasses?

George


On Fri, Jul 30, 2021 at 15:00, jimcoble2000 via groups.io
<jimcoble2000@...> wrote:
Halcyon days. You need to see the movie "Ad Astra" They have rovers too.......................and guns.

Speaking of. I took my first trip in the car today. No problem. First time I have driven without glasses in my life. Nice day for it. I dedicate my trip to Apollo15

On Friday, July 30, 2021, 12:53:04 PM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Fifty years ago today, on July 30, 1971, Apollo 15 landed on the moon.  

It was the fourth manned lunar landing but the very first to include a car.  Amazing but true.  It was folded-up and attached to a stronger version of the Lunar Module for the trip to the moon.  The Lunar Roving Vehicle, or LRV in NASA-speak, gave the lunar astronauts (David Scott and James Irwin) wheels, greatly improving their mobility and extending their exploration range.  I remember that they also had lots of fun driving it around like a dune buggy.  They traveled about 17 miles during their stay of almost 3 days on the moon.  The battery-powered buggy was a great success, and NASA also included it on Apollo 16 and 17, the two remaining manned moon missions.

The camera on the LRV allowed us to see for the first time the launch of the Ascent Stage of the Lunar Module when the astronauts left the moon on the journey home.

Also for the first time, this mission launched a separate satellite into lunar orbit.  The Particles and Fields sub-satellite was spring-launched from the Service Module just before the astronauts left lunar orbit for earth.

Those were the days – Much more info in NASA’s mission summary here:


Roy