Nice evening last night


jimcoble2000
 

Boy these nights are short. It seems like you set up, align look at a couple of things and then "the party's over".

But under fairly cool skies, minimal bugs, and steady seeing we were able to do quite a bit of star splitting. Most of which were sub 1.5 arc seconds. So many stars so little memory (unless you are Blackwell who can log 30 stars with descriptions). As the scarecrow said "If I only had a brain"!

Two that stand out were Zeta Hercules and Antares. You know you have a close one when the other observer calls you over and asks "can you see that"? OR "did I see that" ?

Better than "Is that the same star"?

Zeta has a very tiny dot that of course sits right on a diffraction ring. So easy to miss since the magnitude difference is considerable. Like quantum, it may be there or it may not. Too bad the double star book by Sissie Haas is now out of print. I have one and it is an indispensable guide. We viewed it in Kent's six inch refractor which is a star splitting machine. Magnitude 3 and 6 at 1.4 arc seconds. Sky tools says not "splitable". What does it know?

It has been some years since we tried Antares. Being low in the south and a summer object with plenty of distraction nearby. I have not tried for some time. Kent could not do it in the 6 last night low in the sky. I was able to do it fairly well in the 5 inch with high power, 406X. The companion was easily visible just past the first diffraction ring. This is where your wide field eyepieces, that caused your last divorce, don't work so well. I used the Vixen 2.4mm, now discontinued I believe. After that it was time to take it all apart again. Seems like we just set up.


Kent Blackwell
 

I think Sissy Haas is correct calling the Zeta Herculis separation as 0.9" rather than SkySafari at 1.5". Either way, the secondary is such a faint and tiny "dot" next to brilliant Zeta.

The most memorable split that Mark and I had of Antares was with the 80mm TMB back on May 10, 2006 from Pungo using a TMB 4mm with a 2.5x Tele Vue Powertmate Barlow (375x) removing the star diagonal and viewing it "straight through". 

On Thu, 16 Jun 2022 12:21:53 +0000 (UTC), Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:
 
Boy these nights are short. It seems like you set up, align look at a couple of things and then "the party's over".
 
But under fairly cool skies, minimal bugs, and steady seeing we were able to do quite a bit of star splitting. Most of which were sub 1.5 arc seconds. So many stars so little memory (unless you are Blackwell who can log 30 stars with descriptions). As the scarecrow said "If I only had a brain"!
 
Two that stand out were Zeta Hercules and Antares. You know you have a close one when the other observer calls you over and asks "can you see that"? OR "did I see that" ?
 
Better than "Is that the same star"?
 
Zeta has a very tiny dot that of course sits right on a diffraction ring. So easy to miss since the magnitude difference is considerable. Like quantum, it may be there or it may not. Too bad the double star book by Sissie Haas is now out of print. I have one and it is an indispensable guide. We viewed it in Kent's six inch refractor which is a star splitting machine. Magnitude 3 and 6 at 1.4 arc seconds. Sky tools says not "splitable". What does it know?
 
It has been some years since we tried Antares. Being low in the south and a summer object with plenty of distraction nearby. I have not tried for some time. Kent could not do it in the 6 last night low in the sky. I was able to do it fairly well in the 5 inch with high power, 406X. The companion was easily visible just past the first diffraction ring. This is where your wide field eyepieces, that caused your last divorce, don't work so well. I used the Vixen 2.4mm, now discontinued I believe. After that it was time to take it all apart again. Seems like we just set up.


jimcoble2000
 

Luke..............take the diagonal out................use the force. Let go your diagonal.................

On Thursday, June 16, 2022 at 09:59:24 AM EDT, kent@... <kent@...> wrote:


I think Sissy Haas is correct calling the Zeta Herculis separation as 0.9" rather than SkySafari at 1.5". Either way, the secondary is such a faint and tiny "dot" next to brilliant Zeta.

The most memorable split that Mark and I had of Antares was with the 80mm TMB back on May 10, 2006 from Pungo using a TMB 4mm with a 2.5x Tele Vue Powertmate Barlow (375x) removing the star diagonal and viewing it "straight through". 

On Thu, 16 Jun 2022 12:21:53 +0000 (UTC), Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:
 
Boy these nights are short. It seems like you set up, align look at a couple of things and then "the party's over".
 
But under fairly cool skies, minimal bugs, and steady seeing we were able to do quite a bit of star splitting. Most of which were sub 1.5 arc seconds. So many stars so little memory (unless you are Blackwell who can log 30 stars with descriptions). As the scarecrow said "If I only had a brain"!
 
Two that stand out were Zeta Hercules and Antares. You know you have a close one when the other observer calls you over and asks "can you see that"? OR "did I see that" ?
 
Better than "Is that the same star"?
 
Zeta has a very tiny dot that of course sits right on a diffraction ring. So easy to miss since the magnitude difference is considerable. Like quantum, it may be there or it may not. Too bad the double star book by Sissie Haas is now out of print. I have one and it is an indispensable guide. We viewed it in Kent's six inch refractor which is a star splitting machine. Magnitude 3 and 6 at 1.4 arc seconds. Sky tools says not "splitable". What does it know?
 
It has been some years since we tried Antares. Being low in the south and a summer object with plenty of distraction nearby. I have not tried for some time. Kent could not do it in the 6 last night low in the sky. I was able to do it fairly well in the 5 inch with high power, 406X. The companion was easily visible just past the first diffraction ring. This is where your wide field eyepieces, that caused your last divorce, don't work so well. I used the Vixen 2.4mm, now discontinued I believe. After that it was time to take it all apart again. Seems like we just set up.


Kent Blackwell
 

According to sources the current separation of Zeta Herculis is 0.9. I've only split the pair twice. Last night with a 6" f/7.3 refractor and May 13, 2004 with a 10" Orion IntelliScope at 200x, when the pair were only 0.87". The widest separation will occur between 2024-2027 at 1.5". 

Kent B