Viewing Sirius on a cold winter night


Kent Blackwell
 

Mark O and I split the brilliant star Sirius last night with the 25" from my backyard observatory in Virginia Beach. I've only split it a few times in my 50 years of stargazing. The current separation is 10 arc-seconds. So, what's the big deal, that's not all that close. The problem is Sirius is 10,000 times brighter than Sirius B, often called The Pup.


Ian Stewart
 

Good job!!

On 1/23/2021 8:18 AM, Kent Blackwell wrote:
Mark O and I split the brilliant star Sirius last night with the 25" from my backyard observatory in Virginia Beach. I've only split it a few times in my 50 years of stargazing. The current separation is 10 arc-seconds. So, what's the big deal, that's not all that close. The problem is Sirius is 10,000 times brighter than Sirius B, often called The Pup.


jimcoble2000
 

It was quite remarkable. The conditions were perfect. That is only the second time in 30 some years I have seen it. It all came together. I am not sure an amateur refractor can do it due to the nature of the diffraction pattern inherent in refractors. Maybe it can though. It would be interesting to see if anyone else has done it that way. The spider diffraction was in a perfect position to view and locate the secondary.  

On Saturday, January 23, 2021, 8:33:07 AM EST, Ian Stewart <ian@...> wrote:


Good job!!

On 1/23/2021 8:18 AM, Kent Blackwell wrote:
Mark O and I split the brilliant star Sirius last night with the 25" from my backyard observatory in Virginia Beach. I've only split it a few times in my 50 years of stargazing. The current separation is 10 arc-seconds. So, what's the big deal, that's not all that close. The problem is Sirius is 10,000 times brighter than Sirius B, often called The Pup.


Ian Stewart
 

Jerry Lodriguss has a great image of Sirius and the pup on his website ... Cheers Ian

Sirius and Pup

On 1/23/2021 8:18 AM, Kent Blackwell wrote:
Mark O and I split the brilliant star Sirius last night with the 25" from my backyard observatory in Virginia Beach. I've only split it a few times in my 50 years of stargazing. The current separation is 10 arc-seconds. So, what's the big deal, that's not all that close. The problem is Sirius is 10,000 times brighter than Sirius B, often called The Pup.


Ted Forte
 

Mark wrote (re: viewing Sirius) “I am not sure an amateur refractor can do it … ”

 

I’m surprised by your saying that Mark. In my experience, a refractor and twilight is the ticket!  I’ve had three successful observations of Sirius (maybe four).

 

March 31, 2000 at NWRP (in twilight) Bob Stewart and I viewed the Pup in his 4-inch refractor.

 

March 6, 2010 at Ost Observatory, we saw it in your refractor, Mark.

 

March 26,  2015 at Patterson Observatory (in twilight) I saw it with Rick Burke’s 4-inch refractor.

 

I’ve tried it twice with the 30 and failed.

 

There was one more time, at a gathering at Kent’s trailer in Coinjock circa 2000 or so.  I don’t have any notes but I remember it being a thing.

 

Ted

 

 

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2021 6:39 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Viewing Sirius on a cold winter night

 

It was quite remarkable. The conditions were perfect. That is only the second time in 30 some years I have seen it. It all came together. I am not sure an amateur refractor can do it due to the nature of the diffraction pattern inherent in refractors. Maybe it can though. It would be interesting to see if anyone else has done it that way. The spider diffraction was in a perfect position to view and locate the secondary.  

 

On Saturday, January 23, 2021, 8:33:07 AM EST, Ian Stewart <ian@...> wrote:

 

 

Good job!!

On 1/23/2021 8:18 AM, Kent Blackwell wrote:

Mark O and I split the brilliant star Sirius last night with the 25" from my backyard observatory in Virginia Beach. I've only split it a few times in my 50 years of stargazing. The current separation is 10 arc-seconds. So, what's the big deal, that's not all that close. The problem is Sirius is 10,000 times brighter than Sirius B, often called The Pup.


jimcoble2000
 

Thank you Ian. You know I don't think there is much skill involved with doing this outside of persistence. It is mostly a matter of luck and the universe deciding to let you in during that hour. Most of the time the door is locked and nothing you can do will get you in. That was also the first time I have seen it without an occulting disc. That was most surprising.

We have done two very difficult doubles this year. Porrima was the other star that you can only do when the pair are the furthest apart. Both have 100:1 failure to success ratio

On Saturday, January 23, 2021, 8:48:01 AM EST, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Jerry Lodriguss has a great image of Sirius and the pup on his website ... Cheers Ian

Sirius and Pup

On 1/23/2021 8:18 AM, Kent Blackwell wrote:
Mark O and I split the brilliant star Sirius last night with the 25" from my backyard observatory in Virginia Beach. I've only split it a few times in my 50 years of stargazing. The current separation is 10 arc-seconds. So, what's the big deal, that's not all that close. The problem is Sirius is 10,000 times brighter than Sirius B, often called The Pup.


Kent Blackwell
 

Ted, I was  looking through my logs. I thought last night was the first time I've seen The Pup from Virginia Beach location but apparently I also saw it on a night of excellent seeing with the 25" January 30, 2002 using a 10.5mm Gailand Orthoscopic eyepiece. The Gailand is one of the finest eyepieces ever made, unfortunately long discontinued. I have yet to see it in my 100/800 TMB refractor. Everyone get out you telescopes and give it a try. Hey, what could be easier to find in the night sky than Sirius?


Jim Tallman
 

What does it look like? 😎


On Jan 23, 2021 at 12:10, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Ted, I was  looking through my logs. I thought last night was the first time I've seen The Pup from Virginia Beach location but apparently I also saw it on a night of excellent seeing with the 25" January 30, 2002 using a 10.5mm Gailand Orthoscopic eyepiece. The Gailand is one of the finest eyepieces ever made, unfortunately long discontinued. I have yet to see it in my 100/800 TMB refractor. Everyone get out you telescopes and give it a try. Hey, what could be easier to find in the night sky than Sirius?


Ian Stewart
 

Well I took the challenge last night with my 5 inch. Sirius looked like the backdrop to the Fireworks Symphony ( this after a couple hours of cooling). Seeing was horrible. That said the terminator was in a perfect spot to bring out some great detail in Sinus Iridium on the moon. That whole area around the northwest corner was well lit ... Cheers Ian


jimcoble2000
 

this Jim                (   .  )

On Saturday, January 23, 2021, 8:56:05 PM EST, Jim Tallman <jctallman@...> wrote:


What does it look like? 😎


On Jan 23, 2021 at 12:10, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Ted, I was  looking through my logs. I thought last night was the first time I've seen The Pup from Virginia Beach location but apparently I also saw it on a night of excellent seeing with the 25" January 30, 2002 using a 10.5mm Gailand Orthoscopic eyepiece. The Gailand is one of the finest eyepieces ever made, unfortunately long discontinued. I have yet to see it in my 100/800 TMB refractor. Everyone get out you telescopes and give it a try. Hey, what could be easier to find in the night sky than Sirius?