Mars better than ever!


Kent Blackwell
 

Once again Mars looked incredible in my 5" APO refractor on this night before its closest approach, 22 arc-seconds in angular size, or about half way between the size of Saturn's disc and Jupiter's.

 

I tired numerous filters so here are the results:

 

1. No filter, nice because Mars is so natural looking.

 

2. Vernonscope Wratten 25 red by far shows the best surface details but Mars in dark red is very unnatural.

 

3. Vernonscope Wratten 21 orange stacked with Mars A, wonderful details, almost as good as #25 but more natural and pleasing looking.

 

4. Mars A filter, natural, albeit a bit orange.

 

5. Vernonscope Wratten 85 salmon almost as good as the Mars A filter


jimcoble2000
 

Have you tried stacking all the filters? Why not throw in a barlow?

On Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 8:37:12 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


Once again Mars looked incredible in my 5" APO refractor on this night before its closest approach, 22 arc-seconds in angular size, or about half way between the size of Saturn's disc and Jupiter's.

 

I tired numerous filters so here are the results:

 

1. No filter, nice because Mars is so natural looking.

 

2. Vernonscope Wratten 25 red by far shows the best surface details but Mars in dark red is very unnatural.

 

3. Vernonscope Wratten 21 orange stacked with Mars A, wonderful details, almost as good as #25 but more natural and pleasing looking.

 

4. Mars A filter, natural, albeit a bit orange.

 

5. Vernonscope Wratten 85 salmon almost as good as the Mars A filter


Ian Stewart
 

Hey Kent thanks for sharing your experience with filters. Yes last night was splendid. Mars looked great even without filters - Saturn and Jupiter were not too shabby either.

Cheers

Ian

On 10/6/2020 8:37 AM, Kent Blackwell wrote:

Once again Mars looked incredible in my 5" APO refractor on this night before its closest approach, 22 arc-seconds in angular size, or about half way between the size of Saturn's disc and Jupiter's.

 

I tired numerous filters so here are the results:

 

1. No filter, nice because Mars is so natural looking.

 

2. Vernonscope Wratten 25 red by far shows the best surface details but Mars in dark red is very unnatural.

 

3. Vernonscope Wratten 21 orange stacked with Mars A, wonderful details, almost as good as #25 but more natural and pleasing looking.

 

4. Mars A filter, natural, albeit a bit orange.

 

5. Vernonscope Wratten 85 salmon almost as good as the Mars A filter


Ted Forte
 

I got my best look at Mars last night between midnight and 1:30am (that’s MST remember – we don’t do daylight savings time here in Arizona).  All this past week I’ve been getting out around 4 am, but Mars is already getting pretty low by then.

 

So, last night I got my first transit view since September 23rd.  The added altitude really makes a difference. I agree with Kent that the unfiltered view is the most pleasing, but I employed the Mars A filter to bring out surface detail, a blue filter to look for cloud features, and a neutral density moon filter to just cut the glare down.  A Deep Sky filter also works.

 

I don’t really have a cache of planet eyepieces – I use a 7mm Ortho on Mars but also use Naglers and Radians (in the 18 -inch). Seeing is seldom (if ever) good enough to obsess over how many glass elements I put in the light path. LOL

 

Ted

BBAA West

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian Stewart
Sent: Tuesday, October 6, 2020 6:51 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Mars better than ever!

 

Hey Kent thanks for sharing your experience with filters. Yes last night was splendid. Mars looked great even without filters - Saturn and Jupiter were not too shabby either.

Cheers

Ian

On 10/6/2020 8:37 AM, Kent Blackwell wrote:

Once again Mars looked incredible in my 5" APO refractor on this night before its closest approach, 22 arc-seconds in angular size, or about half way between the size of Saturn's disc and Jupiter's.

 

I tired numerous filters so here are the results:

 

1. No filter, nice because Mars is so natural looking.

 

2. Vernonscope Wratten 25 red by far shows the best surface details but Mars in dark red is very unnatural.

 

3. Vernonscope Wratten 21 orange stacked with Mars A, wonderful details, almost as good as #25 but more natural and pleasing looking.

 

4. Mars A filter, natural, albeit a bit orange.

 

5. Vernonscope Wratten 85 salmon almost as good as the Mars A filter


Kent Blackwell
 

Ted, my best view was with a 7mm Pentax XW eyepeice. At least on Mars the superb Vixen 3.4mm HR is too much power and I'm more comfortable using eyepieces with 20mm eye relief (Pentax & Tele Vue Delos to mention a few) because there is plenty of room to place the filter between my eye and the eye lens. To my of thinking it's better than having to remove the eyepiece and screw in a filter, especially to get quick comparisons of various filters. Of all the color filters I have found none match the image quality of Vernonscope's. They're not multi-coated. In fact they're not coated at all but they still produce sharper images than anyone else's I've tried. When I bought my Vernonscope filters they were a steal at $7.95 each. Now they're $39.95, still a good deal, considering inflation. 


Jim Tallman
 

Have you tried using the solar filter yet?


:)




On Oct 6, 2020 at 08:53, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Have you tried stacking all the filters? Why not throw in a barlow?

On Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 8:37:12 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


Once again Mars looked incredible in my 5" APO refractor on this night before its closest approach, 22 arc-seconds in angular size, or about half way between the size of Saturn's disc and Jupiter's.

 

I tired numerous filters so here are the results:

 

1. No filter, nice because Mars is so natural looking.

 

2. Vernonscope Wratten 25 red by far shows the best surface details but Mars in dark red is very unnatural.

 

3. Vernonscope Wratten 21 orange stacked with Mars A, wonderful details, almost as good as #25 but more natural and pleasing looking.

 

4. Mars A filter, natural, albeit a bit orange.

 

5. Vernonscope Wratten 85 salmon almost as good as the Mars A filter



jimcoble2000
 

No haven't thought of that; though........... have thought that since Mars is as close as it gets loading some people unto a one way rocket................................................................

On Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 3:21:05 PM EDT, Jim Tallman <jctallman@...> wrote:


Have you tried using the solar filter yet?


:)




On Oct 6, 2020 at 08:53, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Have you tried stacking all the filters? Why not throw in a barlow?

On Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 8:37:12 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


Once again Mars looked incredible in my 5" APO refractor on this night before its closest approach, 22 arc-seconds in angular size, or about half way between the size of Saturn's disc and Jupiter's.

 

I tired numerous filters so here are the results:

 

1. No filter, nice because Mars is so natural looking.

 

2. Vernonscope Wratten 25 red by far shows the best surface details but Mars in dark red is very unnatural.

 

3. Vernonscope Wratten 21 orange stacked with Mars A, wonderful details, almost as good as #25 but more natural and pleasing looking.

 

4. Mars A filter, natural, albeit a bit orange.

 

5. Vernonscope Wratten 85 salmon almost as good as the Mars A filter



Matthew Cook
 

Using the solar filter at night is the best way to study dark matter.


On Oct 6, 2020, at 16:51, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

No haven't thought of that; though........... have thought that since Mars is as close as it gets loading some people unto a one way rocket................................................................

On Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 3:21:05 PM EDT, Jim Tallman <jctallman@...> wrote:


Have you tried using the solar filter yet?


:)




On Oct 6, 2020 at 08:53, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Have you tried stacking all the filters? Why not throw in a barlow?

On Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 8:37:12 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


Once again Mars looked incredible in my 5" APO refractor on this night before its closest approach, 22 arc-seconds in angular size, or about half way between the size of Saturn's disc and Jupiter's.

 

I tired numerous filters so here are the results:

 

1. No filter, nice because Mars is so natural looking.

 

2. Vernonscope Wratten 25 red by far shows the best surface details but Mars in dark red is very unnatural.

 

3. Vernonscope Wratten 21 orange stacked with Mars A, wonderful details, almost as good as #25 but more natural and pleasing looking.

 

4. Mars A filter, natural, albeit a bit orange.

 

5. Vernonscope Wratten 85 salmon almost as good as the Mars A filter



jimcoble2000
 

Emoji

On Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 5:10:09 PM EDT, Matthew Cook via groups.io <lt_mrcook@...> wrote:


Using the solar filter at night is the best way to study dark matter.


On Oct 6, 2020, at 16:51, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

No haven't thought of that; though........... have thought that since Mars is as close as it gets loading some people unto a one way rocket................................................................

On Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 3:21:05 PM EDT, Jim Tallman <jctallman@...> wrote:


Have you tried using the solar filter yet?


:)




On Oct 6, 2020 at 08:53, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Have you tried stacking all the filters? Why not throw in a barlow?

On Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 8:37:12 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


Once again Mars looked incredible in my 5" APO refractor on this night before its closest approach, 22 arc-seconds in angular size, or about half way between the size of Saturn's disc and Jupiter's.

 

I tired numerous filters so here are the results:

 

1. No filter, nice because Mars is so natural looking.

 

2. Vernonscope Wratten 25 red by far shows the best surface details but Mars in dark red is very unnatural.

 

3. Vernonscope Wratten 21 orange stacked with Mars A, wonderful details, almost as good as #25 but more natural and pleasing looking.

 

4. Mars A filter, natural, albeit a bit orange.

 

5. Vernonscope Wratten 85 salmon almost as good as the Mars A filter



Jim Tallman
 

See, somebody else gets it :)


On Oct 6, 2020 at 17:11, Matthew Cook via groups.io <lt_mrcook@...> wrote:

Using the solar filter at night is the best way to study dark matter.


On Oct 6, 2020, at 16:51, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

No haven't thought of that; though........... have thought that since Mars is as close as it gets loading some people unto a one way rocket................................................................

On Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 3:21:05 PM EDT, Jim Tallman <jctallman@...> wrote:


Have you tried using the solar filter yet?


:)




On Oct 6, 2020 at 08:53, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Have you tried stacking all the filters? Why not throw in a barlow?

On Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 8:37:12 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


Once again Mars looked incredible in my 5" APO refractor on this night before its closest approach, 22 arc-seconds in angular size, or about half way between the size of Saturn's disc and Jupiter's.

 

I tired numerous filters so here are the results:

 

1. No filter, nice because Mars is so natural looking.

 

2. Vernonscope Wratten 25 red by far shows the best surface details but Mars in dark red is very unnatural.

 

3. Vernonscope Wratten 21 orange stacked with Mars A, wonderful details, almost as good as #25 but more natural and pleasing looking.

 

4. Mars A filter, natural, albeit a bit orange.

 

5. Vernonscope Wratten 85 salmon almost as good as the Mars A filter




Dr Bruce
 

Gosh guys, you know how to make these old bones jealous. Sure do miss those nights under the stars.

Doc Bruce

Sent from Dr B's iPad Pro