Observing the deep sky at high power


Kent Blackwell
 

I have always had a special place in my heart for refractors, starting with a 3" Unitron, then a 4" Unitron followed many years later with an 80mm f/8 triplet,  then a 100/900 triplet and now a 5" triplet. It's fun splitting double stars, something that can be done in bright city lights just as well, maybe better than dark sky sites. Why better? It's been my feeling cities offer steadier seeing. I ordered all the Vixen HR eyepieces back in July and have been enamored with all four; 3.4mm, 2.4mm, 2.0 mm and 1.6mm. It's too bad Vixen discontinued them due to poor sales.


jimcoble2000
 

That's what Stan said. It was too late after I left your place to tackle it. It is getting big isn't it?

On Wednesday, September 23, 2020, 11:32:40 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


I had a most incredible view of Mars last night at 1:00 am. It's really getting large in angular size. The southern polar cap was bright white but tiny.
 
Equally incredible was a view of NGC 7009, the Saturn Nebula, nicknamed because of it's squashed shape resembling the planet Saturn. I have never seen it like that, using a 3.4mm VIxen HR eyepiece yielding a whopping 933x! I tried that eyepiece on M57, The Ring Nebula. It nearly filled the entire field of view. I could not, however see the central star. Stepping down in power to ~only~ 630x I occasionally saw it with averted vision.

I also revisited Pease 1, a planetary nebula embedded within the glorious globular cluster, M 15 in Pegasus. It's a challenge to see. I normally don't like using nebula filters when the eyepiece exit pupil is smaller than 2 or 3mm but in this case I had to up the power to 500x. With that power as I blinked the Lumicon OIII filter the illusive stellar planetary popped into view. I was excited. Shall I shout it was the best I've ever seen it?


jimcoble2000
 

oh.................neat Ian. Now you need to jump in there with us and try to get the last three Vixen eyepieces in the world. This is fun refractor sport

On Wednesday, September 23, 2020, 4:04:08 PM EDT, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Sounds like a great night Kent. I got a little time on NGC457. I have a little surprise coming in the mail. A 5 inch triplet. Yes something to keep me amused during images sessions besides the dob ... Cheers Ian


Ian Stewart
 

Sounds like a great night Kent. I got a little time on NGC457. I have a little surprise coming in the mail. A 5 inch triplet. Yes something to keep me amused during images sessions besides the dob ... Cheers Ian


Kent Blackwell
 

I had a most incredible view of Mars last night at 1:00 am. It's really getting large in angular size. The southern polar cap was bright white but tiny.
 
Equally incredible was a view of NGC 7009, the Saturn Nebula, nicknamed because of it's squashed shape resembling the planet Saturn. I have never seen it like that, using a 3.4mm VIxen HR eyepiece yielding a whopping 933x! I tried that eyepiece on M57, The Ring Nebula. It nearly filled the entire field of view. I could not, however see the central star. Stepping down in power to ~only~ 630x I occasionally saw it with averted vision.

I also revisited Pease 1, a planetary nebula embedded within the glorious globular cluster, M 15 in Pegasus. It's a challenge to see. I normally don't like using nebula filters when the eyepiece exit pupil is smaller than 2 or 3mm but in this case I had to up the power to 500x. With that power as I blinked the Lumicon OIII filter the illusive stellar planetary popped into view. I was excited. Shall I shout it was the best I've ever seen it?