APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion


Roy Diffrient
 

Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.


Roy


jimcoble2000
 

What a great overview. Often observing with a telescope you cannot get an overall big picture setting.

Oddly I have found that 20x80 binoculars in a dark sky reveal much that is hidden by using a telescope. The margin of Barnard's Loop is dead obvious in binoculars. Totally hidden in a telescope.  There is an open cluster that is perfect for seeing the boundary of the large loop. Using this as a guide in a small telescope sets the context.

Seeing M-78 in a telescope is interesting but seeing it in a wide field view is revelatory. Without an understanding of the background, the details are always incomplete and deceptive.

It is trend, understandable, for larger and larger telescopes with narrow fields to be used as primary observation tool. They do reveal details and faint objects that only a large aperture can do but they loose context due to design. Try looking at the entire Veil Nebula in a three inch telescope under a dark sky with a wide eyepiece. It puts it all in context.

On Sunday, March 29, 2020, 4:17:00 PM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.


Roy


Jim Tallman
 

Very cool!

Jim

Sent from my stupid phone




On Sun, Mar 29, 2020 at 4:43 PM -0400, "Roy Diffrient" <mail@...> wrote:

Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.


Roy


Jim Tallman
 

:) Word

Sent from my stupid phone




On Sun, Mar 29, 2020 at 6:07 PM -0400, "jimcoble2000 via Groups.Io" <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

What a great overview. Often observing with a telescope you cannot get an overall big picture setting.

Oddly I have found that 20x80 binoculars in a dark sky reveal much that is hidden by using a telescope. The margin of Barnard's Loop is dead obvious in binoculars. Totally hidden in a telescope.  There is an open cluster that is perfect for seeing the boundary of the large loop. Using this as a guide in a small telescope sets the context.

Seeing M-78 in a telescope is interesting but seeing it in a wide field view is revelatory. Without an understanding of the background, the details are always incomplete and deceptive.

It is trend, understandable, for larger and larger telescopes with narrow fields to be used as primary observation tool. They do reveal details and faint objects that only a large aperture can do but they loose context due to design. Try looking at the entire Veil Nebula in a three inch telescope under a dark sky with a wide eyepiece. It puts it all in context.

On Sunday, March 29, 2020, 4:17:00 PM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.


Roy


Ian Stewart
 

OMG!!!

On 3/29/2020 4:16 PM, Roy Diffrient wrote:
Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.


Roy


bob414
 

Very interesting!  I wonder where they were to get 212 hours of cloud free night viewing.  I do not think I seen that much time clear this year.  Maybe it was a multi-year image?

 

Bob

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2020 4:17 PM
To: BBAA Groups Io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

 

Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.

 

 

Roy


jimcoble2000
 

Galileo started the image back in 1637. He became an imager after he went blind.

On Sunday, March 29, 2020, 11:15:45 PM EDT, bob414 <bob414@...> wrote:


Very interesting!  I wonder where they were to get 212 hours of cloud free night viewing.  I do not think I seen that much time clear this year.  Maybe it was a multi-year image?

 

Bob

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2020 4:17 PM
To: BBAA Groups Io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

 

Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.

 

 

Roy


Stu Beaber
 

Yeah Bob...I think it did say that it was multi years and it was 1400 images put togather in a mosaic. I think I figured it out correctly the other day and if my math is correct it comes out to about 10 minutes an image, (using rough figures about 9.8 minutes). That is about what a lot of images use for such bright areas of the sky. Also using ordinary software that could all be automated by programing so you could sleep thru the whole thing. Processing, on the other hand, would be a bear of a job. The same software would assemble the mosaic with the correct overlap and correct background colors.

Stu



On Sun, Mar 29, 2020 at 11:15 PM bob414 <bob414@...> wrote:

Very interesting!  I wonder where they were to get 212 hours of cloud free night viewing.  I do not think I seen that much time clear this year.  Maybe it was a multi-year image?

 

Bob

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2020 4:17 PM
To: BBAA Groups Io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

 

Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.

 

 

Roy


Stu Beaber
 

Corrected message....line 2

"That is about what a lot of IMAGERS use" vice "That is about what a lot of IMAGES use"

Stu


On Mon, Mar 30, 2020 at 7:56 AM Stu Beaber via Groups.Io <wd4sel=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Yeah Bob...I think it did say that it was multi years and it was 1400 images put togather in a mosaic. I think I figured it out correctly the other day and if my math is correct it comes out to about 10 minutes an image, (using rough figures about 9.8 minutes). That is about what a lot of images use for such bright areas of the sky. Also using ordinary software that could all be automated by programing so you could sleep thru the whole thing. Processing, on the other hand, would be a bear of a job. The same software would assemble the mosaic with the correct overlap and correct background colors.

Stu



On Sun, Mar 29, 2020 at 11:15 PM bob414 <bob414@...> wrote:

Very interesting!  I wonder where they were to get 212 hours of cloud free night viewing.  I do not think I seen that much time clear this year.  Maybe it was a multi-year image?

 

Bob

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2020 4:17 PM
To: BBAA Groups Io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

 

Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.

 

 

Roy


Roy Diffrient
 

I looked up the astronomer, Yuri Beletsky.  He's with the ESO in Chile at Carnegie Los Campanas observatory in the Atacama.  The images were taken with a relatively small telescope, then a year to process.  More info here:



On Mar 30, 2020, at 7:56 AM, Stu Beaber <wd4sel@...> wrote:

Yeah Bob...I think it did say that it was multi years and it was 1400 images put togather in a mosaic. I think I figured it out correctly the other day and if my math is correct it comes out to about 10 minutes an image, (using rough figures about 9.8 minutes). That is about what a lot of images use for such bright areas of the sky. Also using ordinary software that could all be automated by programing so you could sleep thru the whole thing. Processing, on the other hand, would be a bear of a job. The same software would assemble the mosaic with the correct overlap and correct background colors.

Stu



On Sun, Mar 29, 2020 at 11:15 PM bob414 <bob414@...> wrote:

Very interesting!  I wonder where they were to get 212 hours of cloud free night viewing.  I do not think I seen that much time clear this year.  Maybe it was a multi-year image?

 

Bob

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2020 4:17 PM
To: BBAA Groups Io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

 

Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.

 

 

Roy