Date   

Re: Last Night's Viewing

jimcoble2000
 

Ha. Another happy convert. Bond would be proud of you. Not the astronomer Bond; the real one, James.

On Monday, September 6, 2021, 01:56:17 PM EDT, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


Hey Mark,

I totally concur. I’ve followed your wise guidance and have made the lavender simple syrup so that I can make your wonderful lavender martini. OMG. Life on the back deck in the middle of a Covid pandemic sipping a freshly made lavender martini with the AstroPub on the back deck with a pair of binoculars and a simple sky chart. Wonderful, wonderful, wonderful. A happy memory living day by day. Thank you, thank you, thank you. You are a most wise and caring AstroBuddy!!!

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Sep 6, 2021, at 11:34 53, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

May I suggest the Martini for observing? Excellent for clarity.

On Monday, September 6, 2021, 10:58:35 AM EDT, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Took a break from imaging last night and setup the 5inch refractor. Seeing was just OK but still enjoyable. Planets were good, tons of milky way objects to look at but the star for me last night (no pun intended) was Herschel's Garnet Star. For some reason it seemed so much redder and brighter than usual. It may have been the wee dram of scotch too. Nonetheless a wonderful evening under the stars.


Re: Last Night's Viewing

Bird Taylor
 

Hey Matthew & Ian,

Our family really enjoys Ironclad Bourbon that is distilled and sold near the shipyard in Newport News:

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Sep 6, 2021, at 14:58 26, Matthew Cook via groups.io <lt_mrcook@...> wrote:

Ian,
   You should try Ragged Branch Burbon.  Made local-ishly near Charlottesville. Cheers!


On Sep 6, 2021, at 14:07, Ian Stewart <ian@...> wrote:



Hey Mark, much as I have tried Martini recipes I still remain a scotch and bourbon kind of guy.

On 9/6/2021 11:34 AM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io wrote:
May I suggest the Martini for observing? Excellent for clarity.

On Monday, September 6, 2021, 10:58:35 AM EDT, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote: 


Took a break from imaging last night and setup the 5inch refractor. Seeing was just OK but still enjoyable. Planets were good, tons of milky way objects to look at but the star for me last night (no pun intended) wasHerschel's Garnet Star. For some reason it seemed so much redder and brighter than usual. It may have been the wee dram of scotch too. Nonetheless a wonderful evening under the stars.


Re: Last Night's Viewing

Matthew Cook
 

Ian,
   You should try Ragged Branch Burbon.  Made local-ishly near Charlottesville. Cheers!


On Sep 6, 2021, at 14:07, Ian Stewart <ian@...> wrote:



Hey Mark, much as I have tried Martini recipes I still remain a scotch and bourbon kind of guy.

On 9/6/2021 11:34 AM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io wrote:
May I suggest the Martini for observing? Excellent for clarity.

On Monday, September 6, 2021, 10:58:35 AM EDT, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Took a break from imaging last night and setup the 5inch refractor. Seeing was just OK but still enjoyable. Planets were good, tons of milky way objects to look at but the star for me last night (no pun intended) was Herschel's Garnet Star. For some reason it seemed so much redder and brighter than usual. It may have been the wee dram of scotch too. Nonetheless a wonderful evening under the stars.


Re: Last Night's Viewing

Ian Stewart
 

Hey Mark, much as I have tried Martini recipes I still remain a scotch and bourbon kind of guy.

On 9/6/2021 11:34 AM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io wrote:
May I suggest the Martini for observing? Excellent for clarity.

On Monday, September 6, 2021, 10:58:35 AM EDT, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Took a break from imaging last night and setup the 5inch refractor. Seeing was just OK but still enjoyable. Planets were good, tons of milky way objects to look at but the star for me last night (no pun intended) was Herschel's Garnet Star. For some reason it seemed so much redder and brighter than usual. It may have been the wee dram of scotch too. Nonetheless a wonderful evening under the stars.


Re: Last Night's Viewing

Bird Taylor
 

Hey Mark,

I totally concur. I’ve followed your wise guidance and have made the lavender simple syrup so that I can make your wonderful lavender martini. OMG. Life on the back deck in the middle of a Covid pandemic sipping a freshly made lavender martini with the AstroPub on the back deck with a pair of binoculars and a simple sky chart. Wonderful, wonderful, wonderful. A happy memory living day by day. Thank you, thank you, thank you. You are a most wise and caring AstroBuddy!!!

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Sep 6, 2021, at 11:34 53, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

May I suggest the Martini for observing? Excellent for clarity.

On Monday, September 6, 2021, 10:58:35 AM EDT, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Took a break from imaging last night and setup the 5inch refractor. Seeing was just OK but still enjoyable. Planets were good, tons of milky way objects to look at but the star for me last night (no pun intended) was Herschel's Garnet Star. For some reason it seemed so much redder and brighter than usual. It may have been the wee dram of scotch too. Nonetheless a wonderful evening under the stars.


Re: Last Night's Viewing

jimcoble2000
 

May I suggest the Martini for observing? Excellent for clarity.

On Monday, September 6, 2021, 10:58:35 AM EDT, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Took a break from imaging last night and setup the 5inch refractor. Seeing was just OK but still enjoyable. Planets were good, tons of milky way objects to look at but the star for me last night (no pun intended) was Herschel's Garnet Star. For some reason it seemed so much redder and brighter than usual. It may have been the wee dram of scotch too. Nonetheless a wonderful evening under the stars.


Last Night's Viewing

Ian Stewart
 

Took a break from imaging last night and setup the 5inch refractor. Seeing was just OK but still enjoyable. Planets were good, tons of milky way objects to look at but the star for me last night (no pun intended) was Herschel's Garnet Star. For some reason it seemed so much redder and brighter than usual. It may have been the wee dram of scotch too. Nonetheless a wonderful evening under the stars.


Re: Moon observing

Ian Stewart
 

Congrats George!

On 9/5/2021 5:49 PM, George Reynolds via groups.io wrote:
Many of you know I have been working on my Lunar II observing program.  Well, I finished it yesterday morning, about 6 a.m.!  I just need to submit my paperwork to our ALCor or the program coordinator.  

Yesterday's Moon was 27 days old, a thin waning crescent, rising at 3:46 am.  I got up about 0550, because I knew the Moon wouldn't be above the trees across the street until around 0600.  Sure enough, about 0620 it peeked between two tall pine trees, and I was able to make my final observation for the Lunar II award.  Dr. Ernest Cherrington, in his book Exploring the Moon Through Binoculars and Small Telescopes, on page 184 states, "The 27-day moon is an unusual sight -- a sight which most people probably never see during their entire lives."  And I can understand why:  (1) you have to get up at an ungodly hour to see it; (2) if you are up at that hour, you're probably getting ready for work or school, but you have to be looking UP toward the east, and you need a low enough horizon to see the Moon; and (3) it disappears as soon as the sun rises.  I went back out about an hour later, and the Moon was GONE!  It faded into the bright blue sky.

Well, I was challenged to try to see the 28-day-old Moon this morning, one day before New Moon.  If few have seen the 27-day Moon, even fewer have seen the 28-day Moon, right?  Moonrise was 0451 today, so I rolled out of bed about 0530.  I knew I would never see it above the trees before sunrise, so I went into the front yard with my Orion 8x42 binoculars and saw the tiny crescent rising above the neighbor's house across the street.  With my binos I was able to see the tiny bright "fingernail", surrounded on the rest of the moon's disc by Earthshine -- the whole Moon was in shadow, re-reflecting light bouncing off the surface of Earth.

Now that I have completed both Astronomical League's Lunar Program (20 years ago!) and now the Lunar II Program, I am tempted to follow Cherrington's day-by-day observations of the Moon in his excellent book.  I initially did the Lunar Program back in 2001 because my untrained eyes had trouble seeing the faint fuzzy Messier objects.  Now I want to keep looking at the Moon, because my cataract-clouded eyes can no longer see the dim objects again, but I can see the bright Moon.  I hope to get the cataracts removed soon, possibly in the next few months.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Re: Moon observing

jimcoble2000
 

Good job. When it comes time for your eye fix let me know and I can give you some expectations. Overall the difference is amazing but there are a few trade offs. Overall though it is well worth it. You sound far worse than I was. Mine went about as smoothly as you could ask for. If you have trouble seeing Messier then it is past time to do something. I suspect you now see a yellow moon. It is going to get a lot brighter.EmojiEmoji

On Sunday, September 5, 2021, 08:22:26 PM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Go George Go!

Roy


On Sep 5, 2021, at 5:51 PM, George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...> wrote:


Many of you know I have been working on my Lunar II observing program.  Well, I finished it yesterday morning, about 6 a.m.!  I just need to submit my paperwork to our ALCor or the program coordinator.  

Yesterday's Moon was 27 days old, a thin waning crescent, rising at 3:46 am.  I got up about 0550, because I knew the Moon wouldn't be above the trees across the street until around 0600.  Sure enough, about 0620 it peeked between two tall pine trees, and I was able to make my final observation for the Lunar II award.  Dr. Ernest Cherrington, in his book Exploring the Moon Through Binoculars and Small Telescopes, on page 184 states, "The 27-day moon is an unusual sight -- a sight which most people probably never see during their entire lives."  And I can understand why:  (1) you have to get up at an ungodly hour to see it; (2) if you are up at that hour, you're probably getting ready for work or school, but you have to be looking UP toward the east, and you need a low enough horizon to see the Moon; and (3) it disappears as soon as the sun rises.  I went back out about an hour later, and the Moon was GONE!  It faded into the bright blue sky.

Well, I was challenged to try to see the 28-day-old Moon this morning, one day before New Moon.  If few have seen the 27-day Moon, even fewer have seen the 28-day Moon, right?  Moonrise was 0451 today, so I rolled out of bed about 0530.  I knew I would never see it above the trees before sunrise, so I went into the front yard with my Orion 8x42 binoculars and saw the tiny crescent rising above the neighbor's house across the street.  With my binos I was able to see the tiny bright "fingernail", surrounded on the rest of the moon's disc by Earthshine -- the whole Moon was in shadow, re-reflecting light bouncing off the surface of Earth.

Now that I have completed both Astronomical League's Lunar Program (20 years ago!) and now the Lunar II Program, I am tempted to follow Cherrington's day-by-day observations of the Moon in his excellent book.  I initially did the Lunar Program back in 2001 because my untrained eyes had trouble seeing the faint fuzzy Messier objects.  Now I want to keep looking at the Moon, because my cataract-clouded eyes can no longer see the dim objects again, but I can see the bright Moon.  I hope to get the cataracts removed soon, possibly in the next few months.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Re: Moon observing

Roy Diffrient
 

Go George Go!

Roy


On Sep 5, 2021, at 5:51 PM, George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...> wrote:


Many of you know I have been working on my Lunar II observing program.  Well, I finished it yesterday morning, about 6 a.m.!  I just need to submit my paperwork to our ALCor or the program coordinator.  

Yesterday's Moon was 27 days old, a thin waning crescent, rising at 3:46 am.  I got up about 0550, because I knew the Moon wouldn't be above the trees across the street until around 0600.  Sure enough, about 0620 it peeked between two tall pine trees, and I was able to make my final observation for the Lunar II award.  Dr. Ernest Cherrington, in his book Exploring the Moon Through Binoculars and Small Telescopes, on page 184 states, "The 27-day moon is an unusual sight -- a sight which most people probably never see during their entire lives."  And I can understand why:  (1) you have to get up at an ungodly hour to see it; (2) if you are up at that hour, you're probably getting ready for work or school, but you have to be looking UP toward the east, and you need a low enough horizon to see the Moon; and (3) it disappears as soon as the sun rises.  I went back out about an hour later, and the Moon was GONE!  It faded into the bright blue sky.

Well, I was challenged to try to see the 28-day-old Moon this morning, one day before New Moon.  If few have seen the 27-day Moon, even fewer have seen the 28-day Moon, right?  Moonrise was 0451 today, so I rolled out of bed about 0530.  I knew I would never see it above the trees before sunrise, so I went into the front yard with my Orion 8x42 binoculars and saw the tiny crescent rising above the neighbor's house across the street.  With my binos I was able to see the tiny bright "fingernail", surrounded on the rest of the moon's disc by Earthshine -- the whole Moon was in shadow, re-reflecting light bouncing off the surface of Earth.

Now that I have completed both Astronomical League's Lunar Program (20 years ago!) and now the Lunar II Program, I am tempted to follow Cherrington's day-by-day observations of the Moon in his excellent book.  I initially did the Lunar Program back in 2001 because my untrained eyes had trouble seeing the faint fuzzy Messier objects.  Now I want to keep looking at the Moon, because my cataract-clouded eyes can no longer see the dim objects again, but I can see the bright Moon.  I hope to get the cataracts removed soon, possibly in the next few months.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Moon observing

George Reynolds
 

Many of you know I have been working on my Lunar II observing program.  Well, I finished it yesterday morning, about 6 a.m.!  I just need to submit my paperwork to our ALCor or the program coordinator.  

Yesterday's Moon was 27 days old, a thin waning crescent, rising at 3:46 am.  I got up about 0550, because I knew the Moon wouldn't be above the trees across the street until around 0600.  Sure enough, about 0620 it peeked between two tall pine trees, and I was able to make my final observation for the Lunar II award.  Dr. Ernest Cherrington, in his book Exploring the Moon Through Binoculars and Small Telescopes, on page 184 states, "The 27-day moon is an unusual sight -- a sight which most people probably never see during their entire lives."  And I can understand why:  (1) you have to get up at an ungodly hour to see it; (2) if you are up at that hour, you're probably getting ready for work or school, but you have to be looking UP toward the east, and you need a low enough horizon to see the Moon; and (3) it disappears as soon as the sun rises.  I went back out about an hour later, and the Moon was GONE!  It faded into the bright blue sky.

Well, I was challenged to try to see the 28-day-old Moon this morning, one day before New Moon.  If few have seen the 27-day Moon, even fewer have seen the 28-day Moon, right?  Moonrise was 0451 today, so I rolled out of bed about 0530.  I knew I would never see it above the trees before sunrise, so I went into the front yard with my Orion 8x42 binoculars and saw the tiny crescent rising above the neighbor's house across the street.  With my binos I was able to see the tiny bright "fingernail", surrounded on the rest of the moon's disc by Earthshine -- the whole Moon was in shadow, re-reflecting light bouncing off the surface of Earth.

Now that I have completed both Astronomical League's Lunar Program (20 years ago!) and now the Lunar II Program, I am tempted to follow Cherrington's day-by-day observations of the Moon in his excellent book.  I initially did the Lunar Program back in 2001 because my untrained eyes had trouble seeing the faint fuzzy Messier objects.  Now I want to keep looking at the Moon, because my cataract-clouded eyes can no longer see the dim objects again, but I can see the bright Moon.  I hope to get the cataracts removed soon, possibly in the next few months.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Re: Patterson Observatory (Sierra Vista AZ)

George Reynolds
 

Outstanding!  I loved the tour.  You've got an excellent facility there.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Thursday, September 2, 2021, 03:27:44 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


I have probably mentioned the Patterson Observatory a few times on this forum.  I’ve been “Director” at this observatory since 2013. It’s sort of the club house for our astronomy club and a center of many of our outreach events. It’s pretty much my second home here.

 

The Patterson Observatory is listed as a NASA Space Place and has a 16 foot dome, housing a Ritchey-Chretien telescope of 20” aperture.

my.matterport.com

The 3D tour of the observatory was created by Ryan Straight, a professor at the University of Arizona, College of Applied Science and Technology cyber program. I hope you enjoy it.

 

Ted

BBAA Southwest


Re: Polar Alignment

George Reynolds
 

Dino,

I will send you the info on Amateur Astronomy Magazine when I get home from church. (I am replying to your message instead of singing during the song service.) 
:-)

George


On Fri, Sep 3, 2021 at 5:10, Jim Tallman
<jctallman@...> wrote:
Lol.. we didn't get this email either Dino 😎

Jim

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
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Important astronomical discovery

jimcoble2000
 

Aside from the miracle of three nights of excellent observing Kent and I made a major discovery last night of significant importance. I had a small UV flashlight with me to look at a moth we had seen the previous night. Not finding the moth, I looked around the astronomy shed out of curiosity and discovered:

The green striping and labels of Televue eyepieces are very fluorescent. They glow in the dark under UV light. Why this should be I can't imagine but there it is is. Little glowing nebulae on the shelf. This is a major observationEmoji. Try this observation yourself.


Re: The Cave from Last Night

Jim Tallman
 

Way from Norfolk :). The idea is to sell this one, use the money to buy some land, most likely NC or Suffolk, and rent for a bit to wait for the market to fall apart, then build a new place.

Just tired of inconsiderate people who you must live next to.

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Re: The Cave from Last Night

charles jagow
 

Where you going?

Sent from Chuck's iPhone

On Sep 4, 2021, at 12:36, Jim Tallman <jctallman@...> wrote:


Nice shot Ian. I guess I'll break my gear out tonight :). Might be the last imagery I do from this location :)

Jim

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Today's Sun

Jim Tallman
 

If you have hydrogen alpha solar scopes, have a look at the sun today very nice prominence is around and a fairly good size sunspot. Finally some activity

Jim

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Re: The Cave from Last Night

Jim Tallman
 

Nice shot Ian. I guess I'll break my gear out tonight :). Might be the last imagery I do from this location :)

Jim

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Re: Planetary Nebula Central Stars

jimcoble2000
 

That and the general hazy interiors of PNs require good definition to be able to separate the star from the background in so many of them. Maybe like the moons of Saturn. All you need to do is smear the light the tiniest bit and it is gone.

On Saturday, September 4, 2021, 12:10:31 PM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


It's interesting that atmospheric seeing makes a huge difference is detecting the central stars in PnE. Probably because the magnification can be pushed to the absolute limit. 


The Cave from Last Night

Ian Stewart
 

OK the wonderful nights just keep on coming. Here's the Cave Nebula or SH2 155 from last night. Sorry about the fuzzy stars:-(
Cheers
Ian
SH2 155

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