Date   

Total Lunar Eclipse Watch Party

Shawn Loescher
 

The Chesapeake Planetarium Director, Dr. Robert Hitt and Kent Blackwell have invited our club to attend a total lunar eclipse watch party at the Chesapeake Planetarium. The event starts at 9:15 PM on May 15th, 2022 (a Sunday) and the Moon exits the penumbra at 2:50 AM on the 16th. Due to COVID restrictions I am unsure if Robert is planning on opening the planetarium for movies like last time but you can be certain that it will be much warmer that the last total lunar eclipse we attended there in Jan of 2019.

RSVP and event details here: https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/club/event-view.cfm?Event_ID=122296


Tau Canis Major clarification.

jimcoble2000
 

 In an earlier post about the planetarium observing session last night I have mistakenly attributed a dim star east of Tau Canis Major as a member of that multiple system. Upon further reading there are 5 components but none are visible in any amateur telescope. There is a much dimmer star close by that appears to be a companion of the bright primary but it is just part of the cluster. Sure looks like a double though, close but no cigar as they say. It is still fun to see it as it is three magnitudes difference and close to the bright primary Tau.  I have long thought it was a component but have been mistaken. Great cluster still though.


Re: Chesapeake Planetarium last night

Shawn Loescher
 

I misspoke last night about the upcoming total lunar eclipse. It is in May. I was going over Robert's flyer and I must have misread it last night.


Re: Chesapeake Planetarium last night

jimcoble2000
 

we could install a walk in freezer in the back to store the telescope.

On Friday, January 28, 2022, 10:07:54 AM EST, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


Thanks, Mark for bringing your telescope. 

We 59 out of 60 showed up for the show, and Bob said they all liked the program. We even had two girls from Old Dominion University asking if people would take a survey of what they thought of the show. All said they learned a lot and found the show fun and interesting. 

Shawn and I had the Celestron C-14 aimed at M 42, always a crowd pleaser. The 5th Trapezium star was easy but we didn't see the 6th star. The C-14 requires a long cool down after taking it outside from the warm building, and it was 28 degrees outside.

Kent

--- jimcoble2000@... wrote:

From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>
To: BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>, kentblackwell <kent@...>, Roy Diffrient <mail@...>
Subject: Chesapeake Planetarium last night
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2022 14:24:10 +0000 (UTC)

Shawn, Kent, and I had a nice crowd last night under cold (though not as cold as Wednesday night). We were curious how many people would stay to look through the telescopes after the show. Well we actually had a pretty good crowd for at least sometime after Bob Hitt's show. It is nice to be able to show the actual thing after the program. So much of our information now is mediated through electronic media and so little is actually experienced directly. Both have their place but there is nothing like actually going out and seeing it yourself. We pick obvious easy targets that are satisfying for the guests and are not too much of a challenge for them to see.

 In the late winter, a fun object for public viewing that not many people visit due to it's southern location in Canis Major, is a diamond of a cluster, the Tua Canis Major cluster also known as the Northern Jewel Box. This is a good public object as it is easy to see and it has a couple of surprises in it. It is an ideal cluster to demonstrate averted vision. It amazes people how many more stars they see when they avert their attention just a little bit. It instantly rewards technique and elicits responses. The central star is a fairly close triple though for the public, seeing the secondary is a challenge and rewarding but not impossible. I don't try the third star with them. The cluster can also be viewed by children due to it's bright central star but I don't instruct them on averted vision. That is too challenging for young children. If they just see it they are happy and if not, they are happy.

When a couple of people stay after the crowds then you can go to several nice doubles in Gemini and Orion, Carbon stars like WZ Cassiopeia, which is always a crowd pleaser due to the color contrast. It is a winter Alberio.



Re: Chesapeake Planetarium last night

Kent Blackwell
 

Thanks, Mark for bringing your telescope. 

We 59 out of 60 showed up for the show, and Bob said they all liked the program. We even had two girls from Old Dominion University asking if people would take a survey of what they thought of the show. All said they learned a lot and found the show fun and interesting. 

Shawn and I had the Celestron C-14 aimed at M 42, always a crowd pleaser. The 5th Trapezium star was easy but we didn't see the 6th star. The C-14 requires a long cool down after taking it outside from the warm building, and it was 28 degrees outside.

Kent

--- jimcoble2000@... wrote:

From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>
To: BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>, kentblackwell <kent@...>, Roy Diffrient <mail@...>
Subject: Chesapeake Planetarium last night
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2022 14:24:10 +0000 (UTC)

Shawn, Kent, and I had a nice crowd last night under cold (though not as cold as Wednesday night). We were curious how many people would stay to look through the telescopes after the show. Well we actually had a pretty good crowd for at least sometime after Bob Hitt's show. It is nice to be able to show the actual thing after the program. So much of our information now is mediated through electronic media and so little is actually experienced directly. Both have their place but there is nothing like actually going out and seeing it yourself. We pick obvious easy targets that are satisfying for the guests and are not too much of a challenge for them to see.

 In the late winter, a fun object for public viewing that not many people visit due to it's southern location in Canis Major, is a diamond of a cluster, the Tua Canis Major cluster also known as the Northern Jewel Box. This is a good public object as it is easy to see and it has a couple of surprises in it. It is an ideal cluster to demonstrate averted vision. It amazes people how many more stars they see when they avert their attention just a little bit. It instantly rewards technique and elicits responses. The central star is a fairly close triple though for the public, seeing the secondary is a challenge and rewarding but not impossible. I don't try the third star with them. The cluster can also be viewed by children due to it's bright central star but I don't instruct them on averted vision. That is too challenging for young children. If they just see it they are happy and if not, they are happy.

When a couple of people stay after the crowds then you can go to several nice doubles in Gemini and Orion, Carbon stars like WZ Cassiopeia, which is always a crowd pleaser due to the color contrast. It is a winter Alberio.



Chesapeake Planetarium last night

jimcoble2000
 

Shawn, Kent, and I had a nice crowd last night under cold (though not as cold as Wednesday night). We were curious how many people would stay to look through the telescopes after the show. Well we actually had a pretty good crowd for at least sometime after Bob Hitt's show. It is nice to be able to show the actual thing after the program. So much of our information now is mediated through electronic media and so little is actually experienced directly. Both have their place but there is nothing like actually going out and seeing it yourself. We pick obvious easy targets that are satisfying for the guests and are not too much of a challenge for them to see.

 In the late winter, a fun object for public viewing that not many people visit due to it's southern location in Canis Major, is a diamond of a cluster, the Tua Canis Major cluster also known as the Northern Jewel Box. This is a good public object as it is easy to see and it has a couple of surprises in it. It is an ideal cluster to demonstrate averted vision. It amazes people how many more stars they see when they avert their attention just a little bit. It instantly rewards technique and elicits responses. The central star is a fairly close triple though for the public, seeing the secondary is a challenge and rewarding but not impossible. I don't try the third star with them. The cluster can also be viewed by children due to it's bright central star but I don't instruct them on averted vision. That is too challenging for young children. If they just see it they are happy and if not, they are happy.

When a couple of people stay after the crowds then you can go to several nice doubles in Gemini and Orion, Carbon stars like WZ Cassiopeia, which is always a crowd pleaser due to the color contrast. It is a winter Alberio.



Re: Nerdism

jimcoble2000
 

On Thursday, January 27, 2022, 06:32:54 PM EST, Paul <paultar@...> wrote:


Bill captured my sentiments perfectly on this thread. I wonder how many of us used to read encyclopedia volumes for fun :-)
- Paul


On Thu, Jan 27, 2022 at 3:52 PM preciousmyprecious via groups.io <preciousmyprecious=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
All research topics had to start with "A.": THAT is totally awesome. I love that in this club we can let our inner nerd out to play.

Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean


On Thursday, January 27, 2022, 03:04:45 PM EST, Thomas Flatley <flatleytf@...> wrote:


Sorry, but I had to join in. Growing up we only had one volume of the encyclopedia. My dad didn't buy the whole set and salesman only left us one book, - A. So all my grade school projects and 'research papers' were limited to subjects that started with the letter A. My grades weren't....

Tom

On Thu, Jan 27, 2022 at 12:31 PM charles jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

George,

 

May have you beat in the book nerd department.  Back here in Colorado while in grade school all we had for “entertainment” was  A 10” black/white TV that only received one channel NBC.  Several of those years it was nonfunctional and being kind of a luxury in my Grandma’s view, not high in importance of getting fixed.  So, we also had an encyclopedia set (1962 I believe) however, the volume “P” was missing.   I must admit that during those grade school years I read the entire set more than once.  I also used to read Websters Collegiate dictionary just to learn words that none of my peers would know.

 

Now here in Colorado I have a WORKING 65” TV and hundreds of channels.

 

I did a Solar Outreach at the local school a week or so ago and borrowed one of their Physical Science text books to read.

 

I ended up throwing out my only printed dictionary after our move as it had become severely damaged in transit, I guess I need to replace it, but poking F7 in Word is so much easier…

 

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "George Reynolds via groups.io" <pathfinder027=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 9:21 AM
To: BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Nerdism

 

I was browsing through my Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary ((c) 1984) [!] and happened upon the word (proper name) "Cynthia", with the definitions (which refer to other words) 1. Artemis and 2. Moon.  

 

You all know that "Artemis" is NASA's name for the projected return to the Moon.  Artemis was the sister of Apollo, the Greek and Roman god of sunlight, prophecy, music, and poetry.  When I looked up "Artemis" I was a bit surprised to find that she was a Greek Moon goddess.  So the Artemis name for the Moon project is even more fitting.

 

Yes, I am a nerd, and always have been.  As a kid, when I was bored, my mother would tell me to sit down with a volume of the World Book Encyclopedia.  I would pull a volume off the shelf at random, and start paging through until I ran across something of interest, and I would become absorbed in reading it.  My favorite Christmas present when I was in 9th grade was a copy of Websters's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary.  I sat down after opening presents and read the first 40+ pages of explanatory notes and pronunciation symbols.  I used that dictionary all through high school and college until I was in the Army and got the 9th edition, which I still use.


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia

Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


Re: Nerdism

Paul
 

Bill captured my sentiments perfectly on this thread. I wonder how many of us used to read encyclopedia volumes for fun :-)
- Paul


On Thu, Jan 27, 2022 at 3:52 PM preciousmyprecious via groups.io <preciousmyprecious=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
All research topics had to start with "A.": THAT is totally awesome. I love that in this club we can let our inner nerd out to play.

Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean


On Thursday, January 27, 2022, 03:04:45 PM EST, Thomas Flatley <flatleytf@...> wrote:


Sorry, but I had to join in. Growing up we only had one volume of the encyclopedia. My dad didn't buy the whole set and salesman only left us one book, - A. So all my grade school projects and 'research papers' were limited to subjects that started with the letter A. My grades weren't....

Tom

On Thu, Jan 27, 2022 at 12:31 PM charles jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

George,

 

May have you beat in the book nerd department.  Back here in Colorado while in grade school all we had for “entertainment” was  A 10” black/white TV that only received one channel NBC.  Several of those years it was nonfunctional and being kind of a luxury in my Grandma’s view, not high in importance of getting fixed.  So, we also had an encyclopedia set (1962 I believe) however, the volume “P” was missing.   I must admit that during those grade school years I read the entire set more than once.  I also used to read Websters Collegiate dictionary just to learn words that none of my peers would know.

 

Now here in Colorado I have a WORKING 65” TV and hundreds of channels.

 

I did a Solar Outreach at the local school a week or so ago and borrowed one of their Physical Science text books to read.

 

I ended up throwing out my only printed dictionary after our move as it had become severely damaged in transit, I guess I need to replace it, but poking F7 in Word is so much easier…

 

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "George Reynolds via groups.io" <pathfinder027=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 9:21 AM
To: BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Nerdism

 

I was browsing through my Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary ((c) 1984) [!] and happened upon the word (proper name) "Cynthia", with the definitions (which refer to other words) 1. Artemis and 2. Moon.  

 

You all know that "Artemis" is NASA's name for the projected return to the Moon.  Artemis was the sister of Apollo, the Greek and Roman god of sunlight, prophecy, music, and poetry.  When I looked up "Artemis" I was a bit surprised to find that she was a Greek Moon goddess.  So the Artemis name for the Moon project is even more fitting.

 

Yes, I am a nerd, and always have been.  As a kid, when I was bored, my mother would tell me to sit down with a volume of the World Book Encyclopedia.  I would pull a volume off the shelf at random, and start paging through until I ran across something of interest, and I would become absorbed in reading it.  My favorite Christmas present when I was in 9th grade was a copy of Websters's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary.  I sat down after opening presents and read the first 40+ pages of explanatory notes and pronunciation symbols.  I used that dictionary all through high school and college until I was in the Army and got the 9th edition, which I still use.


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia

Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


Re: Nerdism

preciousmyprecious
 

All research topics had to start with "A.": THAT is totally awesome. I love that in this club we can let our inner nerd out to play.

Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean


On Thursday, January 27, 2022, 03:04:45 PM EST, Thomas Flatley <flatleytf@...> wrote:


Sorry, but I had to join in. Growing up we only had one volume of the encyclopedia. My dad didn't buy the whole set and salesman only left us one book, - A. So all my grade school projects and 'research papers' were limited to subjects that started with the letter A. My grades weren't....

Tom

On Thu, Jan 27, 2022 at 12:31 PM charles jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

George,

 

May have you beat in the book nerd department.  Back here in Colorado while in grade school all we had for “entertainment” was  A 10” black/white TV that only received one channel NBC.  Several of those years it was nonfunctional and being kind of a luxury in my Grandma’s view, not high in importance of getting fixed.  So, we also had an encyclopedia set (1962 I believe) however, the volume “P” was missing.   I must admit that during those grade school years I read the entire set more than once.  I also used to read Websters Collegiate dictionary just to learn words that none of my peers would know.

 

Now here in Colorado I have a WORKING 65” TV and hundreds of channels.

 

I did a Solar Outreach at the local school a week or so ago and borrowed one of their Physical Science text books to read.

 

I ended up throwing out my only printed dictionary after our move as it had become severely damaged in transit, I guess I need to replace it, but poking F7 in Word is so much easier…

 

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "George Reynolds via groups.io" <pathfinder027=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 9:21 AM
To: BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Nerdism

 

I was browsing through my Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary ((c) 1984) [!] and happened upon the word (proper name) "Cynthia", with the definitions (which refer to other words) 1. Artemis and 2. Moon.  

 

You all know that "Artemis" is NASA's name for the projected return to the Moon.  Artemis was the sister of Apollo, the Greek and Roman god of sunlight, prophecy, music, and poetry.  When I looked up "Artemis" I was a bit surprised to find that she was a Greek Moon goddess.  So the Artemis name for the Moon project is even more fitting.

 

Yes, I am a nerd, and always have been.  As a kid, when I was bored, my mother would tell me to sit down with a volume of the World Book Encyclopedia.  I would pull a volume off the shelf at random, and start paging through until I ran across something of interest, and I would become absorbed in reading it.  My favorite Christmas present when I was in 9th grade was a copy of Websters's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary.  I sat down after opening presents and read the first 40+ pages of explanatory notes and pronunciation symbols.  I used that dictionary all through high school and college until I was in the Army and got the 9th edition, which I still use.


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia

Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


Re: Nerdism

Thomas Flatley
 

Sorry, but I had to join in. Growing up we only had one volume of the encyclopedia. My dad didn't buy the whole set and salesman only left us one book, - A. So all my grade school projects and 'research papers' were limited to subjects that started with the letter A. My grades weren't....

Tom

On Thu, Jan 27, 2022 at 12:31 PM charles jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

George,

 

May have you beat in the book nerd department.  Back here in Colorado while in grade school all we had for “entertainment” was  A 10” black/white TV that only received one channel NBC.  Several of those years it was nonfunctional and being kind of a luxury in my Grandma’s view, not high in importance of getting fixed.  So, we also had an encyclopedia set (1962 I believe) however, the volume “P” was missing.   I must admit that during those grade school years I read the entire set more than once.  I also used to read Websters Collegiate dictionary just to learn words that none of my peers would know.

 

Now here in Colorado I have a WORKING 65” TV and hundreds of channels.

 

I did a Solar Outreach at the local school a week or so ago and borrowed one of their Physical Science text books to read.

 

I ended up throwing out my only printed dictionary after our move as it had become severely damaged in transit, I guess I need to replace it, but poking F7 in Word is so much easier…

 

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "George Reynolds via groups.io" <pathfinder027=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 9:21 AM
To: BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Nerdism

 

I was browsing through my Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary ((c) 1984) [!] and happened upon the word (proper name) "Cynthia", with the definitions (which refer to other words) 1. Artemis and 2. Moon.  

 

You all know that "Artemis" is NASA's name for the projected return to the Moon.  Artemis was the sister of Apollo, the Greek and Roman god of sunlight, prophecy, music, and poetry.  When I looked up "Artemis" I was a bit surprised to find that she was a Greek Moon goddess.  So the Artemis name for the Moon project is even more fitting.

 

Yes, I am a nerd, and always have been.  As a kid, when I was bored, my mother would tell me to sit down with a volume of the World Book Encyclopedia.  I would pull a volume off the shelf at random, and start paging through until I ran across something of interest, and I would become absorbed in reading it.  My favorite Christmas present when I was in 9th grade was a copy of Websters's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary.  I sat down after opening presents and read the first 40+ pages of explanatory notes and pronunciation symbols.  I used that dictionary all through high school and college until I was in the Army and got the 9th edition, which I still use.


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia

Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


Re: Nerdism

charles jagow
 

George,

 

May have you beat in the book nerd department.  Back here in Colorado while in grade school all we had for “entertainment” was  A 10” black/white TV that only received one channel NBC.  Several of those years it was nonfunctional and being kind of a luxury in my Grandma’s view, not high in importance of getting fixed.  So, we also had an encyclopedia set (1962 I believe) however, the volume “P” was missing.   I must admit that during those grade school years I read the entire set more than once.  I also used to read Websters Collegiate dictionary just to learn words that none of my peers would know.

 

Now here in Colorado I have a WORKING 65” TV and hundreds of channels.

 

I did a Solar Outreach at the local school a week or so ago and borrowed one of their Physical Science text books to read.

 

I ended up throwing out my only printed dictionary after our move as it had become severely damaged in transit, I guess I need to replace it, but poking F7 in Word is so much easier…

 

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "George Reynolds via groups.io" <pathfinder027@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 9:21 AM
To: BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Nerdism

 

I was browsing through my Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary ((c) 1984) [!] and happened upon the word (proper name) "Cynthia", with the definitions (which refer to other words) 1. Artemis and 2. Moon.  

 

You all know that "Artemis" is NASA's name for the projected return to the Moon.  Artemis was the sister of Apollo, the Greek and Roman god of sunlight, prophecy, music, and poetry.  When I looked up "Artemis" I was a bit surprised to find that she was a Greek Moon goddess.  So the Artemis name for the Moon project is even more fitting.

 

Yes, I am a nerd, and always have been.  As a kid, when I was bored, my mother would tell me to sit down with a volume of the World Book Encyclopedia.  I would pull a volume off the shelf at random, and start paging through until I ran across something of interest, and I would become absorbed in reading it.  My favorite Christmas present when I was in 9th grade was a copy of Websters's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary.  I sat down after opening presents and read the first 40+ pages of explanatory notes and pronunciation symbols.  I used that dictionary all through high school and college until I was in the Army and got the 9th edition, which I still use.


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia

Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


Astronomical League February Sky Maps

Shawn Loescher
 

Attached are the February sky materials from the Astronomical League.


Nerdism

George Reynolds
 

I was browsing through my Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary ((c) 1984) [!] and happened upon the word (proper name) "Cynthia", with the definitions (which refer to other words) 1. Artemis and 2. Moon.  

You all know that "Artemis" is NASA's name for the projected return to the Moon.  Artemis was the sister of Apollo, the Greek and Roman god of sunlight, prophecy, music, and poetry.  When I looked up "Artemis" I was a bit surprised to find that she was a Greek Moon goddess.  So the Artemis name for the Moon project is even more fitting.

Yes, I am a nerd, and always have been.  As a kid, when I was bored, my mother would tell me to sit down with a volume of the World Book Encyclopedia.  I would pull a volume off the shelf at random, and start paging through until I ran across something of interest, and I would become absorbed in reading it.  My favorite Christmas present when I was in 9th grade was a copy of Websters's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary.  I sat down after opening presents and read the first 40+ pages of explanatory notes and pronunciation symbols.  I used that dictionary all through high school and college until I was in the Army and got the 9th edition, which I still use.

George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Star Diagonal Mod

Kent Blackwell
 

If you have a SCT or refractor I've made it easier to manually move the scope around. Since there is no way to add a handle to my telescope mount's tube cradle I glued a knob to the bottom of the star diagonal with E6000 glue. Don't worry, the knob can be removed at a later date  if desired. I found this is so much better than having to grab the base of the star diagonal. 


Re: Star Diagonal Comparisons

jimcoble2000
 

That's an excellent issue and I am not really sure of the answer. I do use a very good (Baader) on my four inch but use a very standard Williams Optics on the 5 inch. I really can't see much difference. I did once have a Televue 1.25 inch diagonal that somehow had a lot of small visible lines that looked like they were in the coating and I felt it did not perform as I would want. I don't think I scratched it as I rarely clean the mirror surface save for using a soft brush.

I do see differences in Prism diagonals and mirrors. Theoretically there is no more light loss using the prism
instead of the mirror surface. That said, the prism may not be appropriate for the rare fast focal ratio telescope. There the color correction may not be quite as good. I think it is really a matter of prism size and vignetting mostly. Roy's answer "depends" applies here. I do see on planets a difference but only at the most critical observing of planet or lunar observing. For the very toughest details I do use my prism on the five inch reflector. But this is only for very very critical observing using Othroscopic design eyepieces. So if you want to take on something like the central rille  in the Alpine Valley, on the moon, I would use the prism. I have only seen it once in decades of observing. There are so many variables in a visual observation.

The prism is not appropriate for my 4 inch which has a very fast focal ratio. Prism diagonals may be a product of the past when there were no good mirror coatings available. At one time they were the only way to get a good image. Today not so much.

On Wednesday, January 26, 2022, 03:01:34 PM EST, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


I’ve always felt we often overspend on diagonal mirrors, or star diagonals for SCT and refractors so I ran a few test. I compared how the 6th star in the Trapezium in the Orion Nebula looked and also compared a very tight 0.5” separation double star. My test diagonals were a run-of-the mill Chinese 2” Celestron (same as Orion) and a Tele Vue Enhansed Aluminum diagonal. Comparing the two side-by-side I saw no differences whatsoever.

Mark O might want to chime in since he has experience comparing mirror diagonals to prism diagonals. 

 

Takahashi TOA 150 telescope

5mm Pentax 5mm XW eyepiece at 220x.


Star Diagonal Comparisons

Kent Blackwell
 

I’ve always felt we often overspend on diagonal mirrors, or star diagonals for SCT and refractors so I ran a few test. I compared how the 6th star in the Trapezium in the Orion Nebula looked and also compared a very tight 0.5” separation double star. My test diagonals were a run-of-the mill Chinese 2” Celestron (same as Orion) and a Tele Vue Enhansed Aluminum diagonal. Comparing the two side-by-side I saw no differences whatsoever.

Mark O might want to chime in since he has experience comparing mirror diagonals to prism diagonals. 

 

Takahashi TOA 150 telescope

5mm Pentax 5mm XW eyepiece at 220x.


Re: FYI – No more StellarCat soon

Roy Diffrient
 

I haven’t looked at all alternatives, and the short answer, as usual, is “it depends”.  Depends in part on what you want the system to do, what scope it’s to be on, who is to install it, and several other factors.  That said, I’ll also say that I’m happy with the system on my 28 – it’s from Sidereal Technology.  So would I recommend a SiTech system?  

It depends …

Roy



On Jan 25, 2022, at 10:16 AM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Is there any good alternative? Not that I plan on doing any new telescopes ever again. Just curious.

On Tuesday, January 25, 2022, 12:06:59 AM EST, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


If I were buying one I would certainly be thinking about it – do I stick with a system that’s on its way out, or do I go for a brand new system that’s unknown?  Or choose some other system entirely?  Glad I don’t have to make the choice.

Roy


On Jan 24, 2022, at 7:24 PM, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:



I think that’s what he means by systems for OEM’s. He’ll probably be fulfilling what’s ordered now and not taking any more.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Monday, January 24, 2022 4:47 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] FYI – No more StellarCat soon

 

Really good news for present owners of ServoCat systems.  But what do you do if you have a ServoCat equipped scope on order?

 

Roy





On Jan 24, 2022, at 5:52 PM, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:



From Gary Myers:

 

- I have systems to go through this year (all dedicated to OEM's) ... but looking forward to at least a partial retirement. I'll continue with service and support. “

 

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2022 9:45 PM
To: BBAA Groups Io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] FYI – No more StellarCat soon

 



I’ve received a mailing list notice that Gary Myers, head of StellarCat, is retiring, and so production of ServoCat GOTO systems will be ending soon.  But Wildcard Innovations, the Australian company that makes the Argo Navis DSC, has been planning to “seamlessly” start producing an advanced GOTO system when ServoCat ends.  However, global chip shortages are slowing that effort.

 

The notice I received is from the Argo Navis users group.  I just checked the ServoCat site and did not see an announcement.

 

Roy

 





Re: Christmas Tree From last Night

Ted Forte
 

Get a PVS-14 Night Vision monocular – that’s exactly (OK – almost) how it looks.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Monday, January 24, 2022 12:11 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Christmas Tree From last Night

 

I wish it looked like that visually. Emoji

 

On Monday, January 24, 2022, 01:50:32 PM EST, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:

 

 

One of my favorite targets for this time of year. Conditions weren't terrific but it was great to get out. This one is NGC2264 also referred to as the Christmas Tree or Cone Nebula.
Cheers
Ian
NGGC2264


Re: FYI – No more StellarCat soon

jimcoble2000
 

Is there any good alternative? Not that I plan on doing any new telescopes ever again. Just curious.

On Tuesday, January 25, 2022, 12:06:59 AM EST, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


If I were buying one I would certainly be thinking about it – do I stick with a system that’s on its way out, or do I go for a brand new system that’s unknown?  Or choose some other system entirely?  Glad I don’t have to make the choice.

Roy


On Jan 24, 2022, at 7:24 PM, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:



I think that’s what he means by systems for OEM’s. He’ll probably be fulfilling what’s ordered now and not taking any more.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Monday, January 24, 2022 4:47 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] FYI – No more StellarCat soon

 

Really good news for present owners of ServoCat systems.  But what do you do if you have a ServoCat equipped scope on order?

 

Roy





On Jan 24, 2022, at 5:52 PM, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:



From Gary Myers:

 

- I have systems to go through this year (all dedicated to OEM's) ... but looking forward to at least a partial retirement. I'll continue with service and support. “

 

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2022 9:45 PM
To: BBAA Groups Io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] FYI – No more StellarCat soon

 



I’ve received a mailing list notice that Gary Myers, head of StellarCat, is retiring, and so production of ServoCat GOTO systems will be ending soon.  But Wildcard Innovations, the Australian company that makes the Argo Navis DSC, has been planning to “seamlessly” start producing an advanced GOTO system when ServoCat ends.  However, global chip shortages are slowing that effort.

 

The notice I received is from the Argo Navis users group.  I just checked the ServoCat site and did not see an announcement.

 

Roy

 





Re: FYI – No more StellarCat soon

Roy Diffrient
 

If I were buying one I would certainly be thinking about it – do I stick with a system that’s on its way out, or do I go for a brand new system that’s unknown?  Or choose some other system entirely?  Glad I don’t have to make the choice.

Roy


On Jan 24, 2022, at 7:24 PM, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:



I think that’s what he means by systems for OEM’s. He’ll probably be fulfilling what’s ordered now and not taking any more.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Monday, January 24, 2022 4:47 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] FYI – No more StellarCat soon

 

Really good news for present owners of ServoCat systems.  But what do you do if you have a ServoCat equipped scope on order?

 

Roy





On Jan 24, 2022, at 5:52 PM, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:



From Gary Myers:

 

- I have systems to go through this year (all dedicated to OEM's) ... but looking forward to at least a partial retirement. I'll continue with service and support. “

 

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2022 9:45 PM
To: BBAA Groups Io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] FYI – No more StellarCat soon

 



I’ve received a mailing list notice that Gary Myers, head of StellarCat, is retiring, and so production of ServoCat GOTO systems will be ending soon.  But Wildcard Innovations, the Australian company that makes the Argo Navis DSC, has been planning to “seamlessly” start producing an advanced GOTO system when ServoCat ends.  However, global chip shortages are slowing that effort.

 

The notice I received is from the Argo Navis users group.  I just checked the ServoCat site and did not see an announcement.

 

Roy

 




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