Date   

Re: Permits

charles jagow
 

 Corn Watch is separate.  I gave the pass down if who does what when to either or both the new Treasurer and the Secretary.  Corn Watch is a special use permit and should be submitted with a copy of the proof of insurance also our insurance needs to mention specifically the city of Chesapeake as insured.  

Sent from Chuck's iPhone

On Sep 16, 2021, at 09:24, George Reynolds <pathfinder027@...> wrote:


Chuck,

Does our coordination with Meghan include our Cornwatch dates at Cornland Park?  Or do we have to do something different for Cornwatch?

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Thursday, September 16, 2021, 11:22:24 AM EDT, George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...> wrote:


Chuck,

When do we have to coordinate with Chippokes Plantation State Park on next year's permit?  I have the Nightwatch dates in our calendar, but I need to confirm them with the Park.  Who is our point of contact?

I sent our 2022 dates to Meghan Roberts at Chesapeake Parks & Rec.  Is there any other coordination we need to do with Chesapeake?

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Re: Permits

George Reynolds
 

Chuck,

Does our coordination with Meghan include our Cornwatch dates at Cornland Park?  Or do we have to do something different for Cornwatch?

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Thursday, September 16, 2021, 11:22:24 AM EDT, George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...> wrote:


Chuck,

When do we have to coordinate with Chippokes Plantation State Park on next year's permit?  I have the Nightwatch dates in our calendar, but I need to confirm them with the Park.  Who is our point of contact?

I sent our 2022 dates to Meghan Roberts at Chesapeake Parks & Rec.  Is there any other coordination we need to do with Chesapeake?

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Permits

George Reynolds
 

Chuck,

When do we have to coordinate with Chippokes Plantation State Park on next year's permit?  I have the Nightwatch dates in our calendar, but I need to confirm them with the Park.  Who is our point of contact?

I sent our 2022 dates to Meghan Roberts at Chesapeake Parks & Rec.  Is there any other coordination we need to do with Chesapeake?

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Re: ISS

George Reynolds
 

Nice!

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Wednesday, September 15, 2021, 09:49:05 PM EDT, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Emoji

On Wednesday, September 15, 2021, 09:37:03 PM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


I missed seeing the Inspiration 4 Falcon 9 rocket by a few minutes but I did capture a picture of the ISS just above Jupiter & Saturn. 


Re: The sky for the last two nights

Ian Stewart
 

Yep I'm there with you George on the old eyes.

On 9/16/2021 9:57 AM, George Reynolds via groups.io wrote:
Ian,

I'm glad to see another person observing the Moon.  I just earned the Lunar II Award of the Astronomical League.  I enjoy observing the Moon and learning its craters, mountains, and other features.  With my old, bad eyes, it is refreshing to be able to SEE something in the night sky.  When I'm out with my granddaughter Chloe, she says, "See that star?" and I say, "What star?"

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Monday, September 13, 2021, 10:05:12 PM EDT, Ian Stewart <ian@...> wrote:


Yep seeing a little iffy tonight. I got 21.58 on the sky meter. Moon was a little reddish. Good views along the terminator though. Alpine valley was great and a stellar view of Aristillus. Jupiter was ok Saturn seemed better. Cassini was no problem, no Encke though. Out viewing in September in t shirt and shorts.
Cheers
Ian


On Sep 13, 2021, at 8:43 PM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


We are once again suffering from the effects of the fires out west. Last night the moon had yellow orange cast as did Jupiter. Both are silvery bright under normal skies. I noticed that during the day the skies had an opaque look that went beyond the humid haze of a summer day. The satellite photo even showed a blanket of hazy air over the mid Atlantic coming from the south west and reaching offshore for some distance. This was a high level layer of ash and dust being transported across the country by high altitude winds.

Tonight I am observing the two planets and seeing is fairly good but the transparency of the sky looks bad. I really can't tell from where I am as the sky is so bad as to almost make it impossible to say if there is a cloud layer unless it is very thick. or the clouds are random discrete cumulus clouds. Jupiter does not look quite as yellow as last night but is not the right color tonight. Bands and the great red spot are not so great this year. The red spot is fairly pale this go around.  A couple of weeks ago we did have a few good nights that showed very fine detail and vortexes on the surface of Jupiter but tonight there is not much to see.


Re: ISS

George Reynolds
 

I watched the launch.  It was fabulous!  I was at church for our Royal Rangers meeting, and I set up my Chromebook in the Royal Rangers office, watching SpaceX.com.  I told one of the other men that we would be able to see the launch from the beach by looking south.  He went out in the church parking lot, and saw the fiery rocket thrust trail!  He saw it heading toward the bright waxing gibbous Moon, and took a picture of it with his cell phone.  He lost it in the Moon's brightness right after that.


George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Wednesday, September 15, 2021, 09:37:03 PM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


I missed seeing the Inspiration 4 Falcon 9 rocket by a few minutes but I did capture a picture of the ISS just above Jupiter & Saturn. 


Re: The sky for the last two nights

George Reynolds
 

Ian,

I'm glad to see another person observing the Moon.  I just earned the Lunar II Award of the Astronomical League.  I enjoy observing the Moon and learning its craters, mountains, and other features.  With my old, bad eyes, it is refreshing to be able to SEE something in the night sky.  When I'm out with my granddaughter Chloe, she says, "See that star?" and I say, "What star?"

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Monday, September 13, 2021, 10:05:12 PM EDT, Ian Stewart <ian@...> wrote:


Yep seeing a little iffy tonight. I got 21.58 on the sky meter. Moon was a little reddish. Good views along the terminator though. Alpine valley was great and a stellar view of Aristillus. Jupiter was ok Saturn seemed better. Cassini was no problem, no Encke though. Out viewing in September in t shirt and shorts.
Cheers
Ian


On Sep 13, 2021, at 8:43 PM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


We are once again suffering from the effects of the fires out west. Last night the moon had yellow orange cast as did Jupiter. Both are silvery bright under normal skies. I noticed that during the day the skies had an opaque look that went beyond the humid haze of a summer day. The satellite photo even showed a blanket of hazy air over the mid Atlantic coming from the south west and reaching offshore for some distance. This was a high level layer of ash and dust being transported across the country by high altitude winds.

Tonight I am observing the two planets and seeing is fairly good but the transparency of the sky looks bad. I really can't tell from where I am as the sky is so bad as to almost make it impossible to say if there is a cloud layer unless it is very thick. or the clouds are random discrete cumulus clouds. Jupiter does not look quite as yellow as last night but is not the right color tonight. Bands and the great red spot are not so great this year. The red spot is fairly pale this go around.  A couple of weeks ago we did have a few good nights that showed very fine detail and vortexes on the surface of Jupiter but tonight there is not much to see.


Re: Last Night's Viewing

George Reynolds
 

That's using your head, Chuck!  Emoji

We miss you at our BBAA events.  Glad you're having a good time out there.  Does your club do any other kinds of outreach?

International Observe the Moon Night (IOMN) is coming up one month from now, on Saturday, 16 October.

George

George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Monday, September 13, 2021, 10:51:03 AM EDT, charles jagow <chuck@...> wrote:


Greetings all!

 

I am sorry I can no longer join in on the Skywatch fun at the NWRP.  Many, Many fond memories.

 

However, last night was my first Solo gig at the SJO (Smokey Jack Observatory) here in Westcliffe.  The night started off kind of cloudy with quarter moon peeking through the clouds.

 

The way the SJO works at present is that folks reserve a night of observing, so it is basically having one family (or a couple or three families) having a private observing session.  The SJO is a 16’x16’ roll-off roof observatory with a Paramount ME mount with a Celestron 14” SCT attached and integrated using the SkyX software.

 

Usually, the session involves a computer operator who commands and controls the mount while the “host” selects the night sky objects and adjusts the eyepiece to be viewable by the participants while provideing a step ladder and assistance as necessary for the viewers to look through the telescope.  The host also provides commentary and explanation on what is visible, what it is, and why it is different or similar to the previous object.

 

As I said, last night was my “solo” as host.  I was acting as both host and computer operator, my guide, mentor, watchdog was none other than the President of the Dark Skies of the Wet Mountain Valley group – literally no-pressure!

 

We viewed for two and a half hours straight with seven participants.  We started off looking at the moon, then progressed to Jupiter and Saturn.  Copiously using the laser pointer we were able to show many things including the Milky Way from horizon to horizon (no shadows generated with the moon out though - Jeff).  We next moved to the Swan nebula, followed by the Blue Snowball and Ring Planetary Nebulae.  We then observed several globular clusters including M3, M13, and M22 followed by open clusters the Wild Duck and Double Cluster.  Next came the Andromeda, Whirlpool and Pinwheel galaxies.  I had to show off some variable stars, the Garnet star (SAO33693) and La Superba (SAO44317) which are nice carbon stars.  I finished out the night with Neptune and a request to return visit to Saturn and Jupiter.

 

When we were locking up, my Watchdog Clint’s only suggestion was that I rambled on a bit much at times, imagine that – me talking too much.  He didn’t say it was a bad thing, but to “time” the yaking to periods when the scope was slewing about and while adjusting the eyepiece.  After all, the participants were there to SEE the night sky sights and not to listen to the nearly blind, bald, fat guy ramble on.

 

The manner in which we conduct outreach at the SJO is a departure to what I am used to at SKYWATCH but just enjoyable all the same.  All in all, it was a good night, and NOW I will get my own set of keys to the SJO!

 

And with the 14” SCT on the Paramount ME mount, we don’t care if they use the scope or the counter-weight bar as a handle…   That darn thing is massive – I learned a healthy “respect” for that counter-weight bar last night, my bleeding scalp was not noticed until I arrived home and removed my BBAA cap with a new red splotch on it!

 

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verdemont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


Re: ISS

Ian Stewart
 

Cool beans!


On Sep 15, 2021, at 9:49 PM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Emoji

On Wednesday, September 15, 2021, 09:37:03 PM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


I missed seeing the Inspiration 4 Falcon 9 rocket by a few minutes but I did capture a picture of the ISS just above Jupiter & Saturn. 
<IMG_7323 Sept 15 2021 Canon 70D A_edited-2.jpg>


Re: ISS

jimcoble2000
 

Emoji

On Wednesday, September 15, 2021, 09:37:03 PM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


I missed seeing the Inspiration 4 Falcon 9 rocket by a few minutes but I did capture a picture of the ISS just above Jupiter & Saturn. 


ISS

Kent Blackwell
 

I missed seeing the Inspiration 4 Falcon 9 rocket by a few minutes but I did capture a picture of the ISS just above Jupiter & Saturn. 


Intro. to Amateur Astronomy given by the Kalamazoo Astronomical Society president Richard Bell

Jeffrey Thornton
 

Just an FYI. This is an email I received from Richard Bell regarding the Introduction to Astronomy course :

Hello, Amateur Astronomers.

 

Thanks to everyone that attended (or at least registered) for the Kalamazoo Astronomical Society's five-part Introduction to Amateur Astronomy lecture series earlier this year. That installment far exceeded our expectations. I am happy to announce that the series will return online in early 2022. We're tentatively planning to begin on January 15th. Registration will likely begin in late October or early November. We will be contacting everyone that registered for the previous installment and astronomy clubs around the country.

 

The main purpose of this email is to inform you about another "semester" of my 11-week Introduction to Astronomy course. Many of you expressed interest in taking this college-level 101-style course in the Fall and I'm happy to announce it will begin on Tuesday, September 28th. Please download the syllabus for full details about the course. Here are the key points to know:

  • The course fee is $150 - a fraction of the cost if you took the course at a community college.
  • We meet every Tuesday and Thursday starting on Sept. 28th from 6:00 - 7:40 pm ET.
  • No class the week of Thanksgiving and we finish-up the week before Christmas.
  • There are no grades, so no stress. You learn for pure enjoyment.
  • If you can't attend at the scheduled time, lectures will be available the following morning at an unlisted link on YouTube.

 

Please feel free to contact me with questions or to register. Thanks and clear skies!

 

Richard Bell
President
Kalamazoo Astronomical Society
https://www.kasonline.org/


Re: Patterson Observatory (Sierra Vista AZ)

Ted Forte
 

We think its pretty cool – I’ve even had feedback from NASA! Patterson is a member of the NASA Museum Alliance and the administrator of that program wrote me to tell me how neat he thought it was! (By the way, that NASA rep is Jeff Nee of JPL and he grew up in Virginia Beach – remembers the Virginia Beach Planetarium.)

 

So, as payment for the tour, I’m supposed to mention that it was produced by the MA-VR-X Lab at CAST (University of Arizona’s College of Applied Science and Technology) and it resides on a US Army server.  That’s at Fort Waa Chew Ka,  Chuck. By the way, if you have a copy of the movie Scent of a Woman (1992), Al Pacino mentions Fort Huachuca and pronounces it correctly.

 

Everything here, it seems, is named either Huachuca or Cochise.

 

Ted

 

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of charles jagow
Sent: Wednesday, September 15, 2021 6:04 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Patterson Observatory (Sierra Vista AZ)

 

Ted,

 

Just now wandered around the online Patterson Observatory, very familiar controls for anyone “house-hunting” these days, very good job and well thought out stopping points.  I thoroughly enjoyed it and with the ability to zoom in almost anywhere, it was like being there in person.  I wonder if we could set something like this up in Kent’s garage, just to view the number and variety of telescopes?

 

 

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Ted Forte <tedforte511@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Thursday, September 2, 2021 at 1:27 PM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Patterson Observatory (Sierra Vista AZ)

 

I have probably mentioned the Patterson Observatory a few times on this forum.  I’ve been “Director” at this observatory since 2013. It’s sort of the club house for our astronomy club and a center of many of our outreach events. It’s pretty much my second home here.

 

The Patterson Observatory is listed as a NASA Space Place and has a 16 foot dome, housing a Ritchey-Chretien telescope of 20” aperture.

my.matterport.com

The 3D tour of the observatory was created by Ryan Straight, a professor at the University of Arizona, College of Applied Science and Technology cyber program. I hope you enjoy it.

 

Ted

BBAA Southwest


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


Re: Patterson Observatory (Sierra Vista AZ)

Ted Forte
 

Waa-chew-ka

 

 

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of charles jagow
Sent: Wednesday, September 15, 2021 5:58 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Patterson Observatory (Sierra Vista AZ)

 

Ted,

 

How should a nearly blind and bald dude pronounce Huachuca?

 

 

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Ted Forte <tedforte511@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Thursday, September 2, 2021 at 1:27 PM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Patterson Observatory (Sierra Vista AZ)

 

I have probably mentioned the Patterson Observatory a few times on this forum.  I’ve been “Director” at this observatory since 2013. It’s sort of the club house for our astronomy club and a center of many of our outreach events. It’s pretty much my second home here.

 

The Patterson Observatory is listed as a NASA Space Place and has a 16 foot dome, housing a Ritchey-Chretien telescope of 20” aperture.

my.matterport.com

The 3D tour of the observatory was created by Ryan Straight, a professor at the University of Arizona, College of Applied Science and Technology cyber program. I hope you enjoy it.

 

Ted

BBAA Southwest


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


Re: Patterson Observatory (Sierra Vista AZ)

charles jagow
 

Ted,

 

Just now wandered around the online Patterson Observatory, very familiar controls for anyone “house-hunting” these days, very good job and well thought out stopping points.  I thoroughly enjoyed it and with the ability to zoom in almost anywhere, it was like being there in person.  I wonder if we could set something like this up in Kent’s garage, just to view the number and variety of telescopes?

 

 

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Ted Forte <tedforte511@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Thursday, September 2, 2021 at 1:27 PM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Patterson Observatory (Sierra Vista AZ)

 

I have probably mentioned the Patterson Observatory a few times on this forum.  I’ve been “Director” at this observatory since 2013. It’s sort of the club house for our astronomy club and a center of many of our outreach events. It’s pretty much my second home here.

 

The Patterson Observatory is listed as a NASA Space Place and has a 16 foot dome, housing a Ritchey-Chretien telescope of 20” aperture.

my.matterport.com

The 3D tour of the observatory was created by Ryan Straight, a professor at the University of Arizona, College of Applied Science and Technology cyber program. I hope you enjoy it.

 

Ted

BBAA Southwest


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


Re: Patterson Observatory (Sierra Vista AZ)

charles jagow
 

Ted,

 

How should a nearly blind and bald dude pronounce Huachuca?

 

 

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Ted Forte <tedforte511@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Thursday, September 2, 2021 at 1:27 PM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Patterson Observatory (Sierra Vista AZ)

 

I have probably mentioned the Patterson Observatory a few times on this forum.  I’ve been “Director” at this observatory since 2013. It’s sort of the club house for our astronomy club and a center of many of our outreach events. It’s pretty much my second home here.

 

The Patterson Observatory is listed as a NASA Space Place and has a 16 foot dome, housing a Ritchey-Chretien telescope of 20” aperture.

my.matterport.com

The 3D tour of the observatory was created by Ryan Straight, a professor at the University of Arizona, College of Applied Science and Technology cyber program. I hope you enjoy it.

 

Ted

BBAA Southwest


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


Re: Observing Jupiter & Saturn

charles jagow
 

The seeing here was poor could barely see cloud bands on Jupiter, the Cassini division was on vacation…

 

Early Wednesday morning, checking out Orion in my 20” and the seeing was worse than the previous evening.  It sure looked nice and sparkly in the 38 degree morning temps here on my driveway.

 

 

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 

Despite hazy skies Tuesday night the seeing was incredible. Saturn and Jupiter looked better than I have ever seen them in the 25”. Saturn was 3-D like at 250x. Color filters often help to see details in Jupiter’s belts. I often use a green filter such as a Wratten 56 or 58. Just by chance I tried a Lumicon Comet filter. You won’t believe how much intricate belt detail is visible with that filter. If you have such a filter look at Jupiter the next time you’re observing. 


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


Oh a different satellite report

jimcoble2000
 

Forgot to mention last night we saw a satellite passing under the moon which would normally not merit comment but as it went under the moon it lit up quite brightly. Those of you who have spent some time under the skies can recall the Iridium constellation of satellites that flared and then faded on a remarkably predictable schedule. All those are now de-orbited so it is odd to see a satellite flare and fade now. I suppose that the moon's light was reflected off the solar panels when the satellite came into the right window to reflect lunar reflected light. Double reflected light so to speak.  The satellite faded quickly after passing away from the moon.


Photo of Jupiter

jimcoble2000
 

The photo sourced from the internet site Spaceweather shows the two dark ovals we saw tonight. There was definitely no remnant of the impact tonight as we observed that area for hours.



Re: Observing Jupiter & Saturn

jimcoble2000
 

Thanks for a great night. It was a planet night for sure. We saw a blizzard of Saturn's moons in the 25. I was able to see three of the faint moons close to the planet in the five inch.

I would not have believed that a comet filter showed what it did on Jupiter. It is sort of a supercharged 56 or 58 green on steroids. Very rarely seen bands in the polar region were accessible tonight in traditional green and the comet filter. Between the main two equatorial belts the comet filter showed many details not visible under normal conditions.

I followed the red spot across the planet tonight for a few hours. The goal was to see if perhaps any trace of the reported impact could be seen. It seems to have left no trace but there was so much else to see that the chase was worth it. Two very dark ovals were visible in the northern equatorial belt. The great red spot is a bit pale this year but the Southern Equatorial belt is intense red. There is dark turbulence in front of the red spot. Jupiter rotates at quite high speed so it only took about 4.5 hours to watch it traverse the face tonight.

We visited Neptune in the 25 inch and I believe we saw Triton tonight with averted vision. I have seen it several times in dark skies with an 18 inch scope and maybe my 12.5 . In the 25 it took careful observation from the suburbs but it was in the correct position and right magnitude 13.5.

The sky looked terrible at 7 but by midnight things had progressed nicely.

On Tuesday, September 14, 2021, 11:28:06 PM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


Despite hazy skies Tuesday night the seeing was incredible. Saturn and Jupiter looked better than I have ever seen them in the 25”. Saturn was 3-D like at 250x. Color filters often help to see details in Jupiter’s belts. I often use a green filter such as a Wratten 56 or 58. Just by chance I tried a Lumicon Comet filter. You won’t believe how much intricate belt detail is visible with that filter. If you have such a filter look at Jupiter the next time you’re observing. 

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