Date   

Red spot on Jupiter

jimcoble2000
 

September 7th the red spot transits the face of Jupiter 2100


Jupiter News

jimcoble2000
 

September 5th at 2111 Europa will be completing a shadow transit. At that time it will be 3/4 of the way off the face.


Re: Star Party!

charles jagow
 

Great! It will be good to see a familiar face!

Sent from Chuck's iPhone

On Aug 31, 2021, at 6:32 PM, Dale Carey via groups.io <vbstargazer@...> wrote:

I'll see ya at Okie-Tex, I'll be there from Friday the 1st till Sat the9th
Hope to see ya there
Dale Carey


-----Original Message-----
From: charles jagow <chuck@...>
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Sent: Tue, Aug 31, 2021 2:20 pm
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Star Party!

All,
 
I am heading out for the first star party I have attended since the last ECSP.  The RMSS, Rocky Mountain Star Stare in Gardner Colorado.  RMSS is held on a 35 acre site that the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society bought about 12 years ago for their club to observe on.  The site, Starry Meadows, is located about 120 miles SW of Colorado Springs.  Lucky for me, Starry Meadows is a mere 34 miles from my hacienda in Westcliffe. 
 
If the weather forecast continues to improve I will pack up the 20” F5, if not I will take the 12” Orion XXG.
 
We had to replace the original Star Pod trailer, it lost a wheel and tore the axle up in Kentucky on the way out here, it was left in KY for repairs awaiting parts.  While waiting, someone offered to buy it, not wanting to drive back to KY and retrieve it after repairs we sold it.  The new Star Pod is a couple feet longer and has a pop out kitchen.  And it also sports a Star Pod CO license plate.
 
Once again Stewie (the Prozac dog) and I will be out among the stars, making new friends.
 
And if this goes well, the Okie-Tex star party is the first weekend in October!
 
v/r
Chuck Jagow
Future         Verde Mont Observatory
Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory
 
 
Gosh. it is so good to hear from all you boys. We used to have such fun at East Coast Star Party; truly a time gone by.

--
v/r
v/r
Chuck Jagow
Future         Verde Mont Observatory
Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory
 
 


Re: Star Party!

Dale Carey
 

I'll see ya at Okie-Tex, I'll be there from Friday the 1st till Sat the9th
Hope to see ya there
Dale Carey


-----Original Message-----
From: charles jagow <chuck@...>
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Sent: Tue, Aug 31, 2021 2:20 pm
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Star Party!

All,
 
I am heading out for the first star party I have attended since the last ECSP.  The RMSS, Rocky Mountain Star Stare in Gardner Colorado.  RMSS is held on a 35 acre site that the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society bought about 12 years ago for their club to observe on.  The site, Starry Meadows, is located about 120 miles SW of Colorado Springs.  Lucky for me, Starry Meadows is a mere 34 miles from my hacienda in Westcliffe. 
 
If the weather forecast continues to improve I will pack up the 20” F5, if not I will take the 12” Orion XXG.
 
We had to replace the original Star Pod trailer, it lost a wheel and tore the axle up in Kentucky on the way out here, it was left in KY for repairs awaiting parts.  While waiting, someone offered to buy it, not wanting to drive back to KY and retrieve it after repairs we sold it.  The new Star Pod is a couple feet longer and has a pop out kitchen.  And it also sports a Star Pod CO license plate.
 
Once again Stewie (the Prozac dog) and I will be out among the stars, making new friends.
 
And if this goes well, the Okie-Tex star party is the first weekend in October!
 
v/r
Chuck Jagow
Future         Verde Mont Observatory
Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory
 
 
Gosh. it is so good to hear from all you boys. We used to have such fun at East Coast Star Party; truly a time gone by.

--
v/r
v/r
Chuck Jagow
Future         Verde Mont Observatory
Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory
 
 


Re: Star Party!

Ian Stewart
 

Hey Chuck, great news. Enjoy the star party. Looking forward to our Staunton River Star Party here.

Cheers

Ian

On 8/31/2021 2:20 PM, charles jagow wrote:

All,

 

I am heading out for the first star party I have attended since the last ECSP.  The RMSS, Rocky Mountain Star Stare in Gardner Colorado.  RMSS is held on a 35 acre site that the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society bought about 12 years ago for their club to observe on.  The site, Starry Meadows, is located about 120 miles SW of Colorado Springs.  Lucky for me, Starry Meadows is a mere 34 miles from my hacienda in Westcliffe. 

 

If the weather forecast continues to improve I will pack up the 20” F5, if not I will take the 12” Orion XXG.

 

We had to replace the original Star Pod trailer, it lost a wheel and tore the axle up in Kentucky on the way out here, it was left in KY for repairs awaiting parts.  While waiting, someone offered to buy it, not wanting to drive back to KY and retrieve it after repairs we sold it.  The new Star Pod is a couple feet longer and has a pop out kitchen.  And it also sports a Star Pod CO license plate.

 

Once again Stewie (the Prozac dog) and I will be out among the stars, making new friends.

 

And if this goes well, the Okie-Tex star party is the first weekend in October!

 

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 

Gosh. it is so good to hear from all you boys. We used to have such fun at East Coast Star Party; truly a time gone by.


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


Re: Polar Alignment

galacticprobe
 

Well, they say "Third time's the charm", so let's see...

I've send two requests for the polar alignment as offered in the original post that started this thread (see the bottom of this, and the last line of the initial post: "I can send you a copy if you don't get AAM.").

As you can see in my request to take up on this offer, I don't get AAM because I never knew it existed. I also never received any replies to the emails send to the address below (rather than having to throw this out over the entire Group). So now I'm throwing it over the entire Group. Maybe this way I'll see something.

I don't get AAM. Can I please get a copy of the "Robust Polar Alignment with Flatness Application" as offered? (At this point I would appreciate a response more than the article being offered; no one likes to be ignored.)

I may have been invisibly for a while, but I have still been posting occasionally, and I do still exist.

Dino.


-----Original Message-----
From: LambuLambu@... <lambulambu@...>
To: willrust@... <willrust@...>
Sent: Sun, Aug 29, 2021 3:29 pm
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Polar Alignment

Hey, Bill,

Did you get my reply to you on this when you first posted it? (I'm just checking because AOL has dropped more than a few emails on me in the past.)

If you could please email me a copy of this I would greatly appreciate it. I don't get the AAM. (Honestly, with all of the different astronomy-related mags out there, I didn't know this one existed until I read your email.) Also, thanks to my military lower back injury I haven't been able to get to any of the BBAA meetings or events for a few years now, so I'm one of those members whose posts you've probable seen occasionally, but you haven't met in person... at least I think.

"Keep looking up!"
Dino.


-----Original Message-----
From: George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...>
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io; William Rust <willrust@...>
Sent: Sat, Aug 28, 2021 9:45 am
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Polar Alignment

Bill, your article in AA was fascinating! Your attention to detail and math skills are impeccable. Not being an imager, much of it ( most of it) was over my head, but I was impressed with your work and your patience, and your detailed explanations. BTW, what does "UEPH" stand for?

George


On Fri, Aug 20, 2021 at 11:43, William Rust
<willrust@...> wrote:
I can probably do that in October.  Oh, by the way, I am not trying to compete with out of the box equipment and software.  I just did the math and field tested it.  It works pretty well.  It is a big improvement over the old-style drift method.
Bill


From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Jeff Goldstein <jeffgold1@...>
Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2021 7:40 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Polar Alignment
 
I like the idea! Perhaps a “mini presentation 10 minute” at the next club meeting?  Just my $0.02
 
Jeff G.
 
From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of William Rust
Sent: Wednesday, August 18, 2021 5:38 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Polar Alignment
 
Hi everybody.  The Pandemic gave me some incentive to finish an astrojob sitting on my desk waiting for me to polish it up.  I did that in March, and submitted my article to Amateur Astronomy Magazine, Summer 2021.  The title is: "Robust Polar Alignment with Flatness Application".  It works pretty fast (say 45 min for 3 sets of star sightings) to get to about 0.5 arcmin error in Altitude and Azimuth. Anyway,  Anything closer that that requires more sightings and is very tricky.  I thought I would share.  If you do astroimaging, then this would be a technique that might benefit you. I can send you a copy if you dont get AAM.
Bill


Re: Star Party!

Matthew Cook
 

Lucky!


On Aug 31, 2021, at 14:24, charles jagow <chuck@...> wrote:



All,

 

I am heading out for the first star party I have attended since the last ECSP.  The RMSS, Rocky Mountain Star Stare in Gardner Colorado.  RMSS is held on a 35 acre site that the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society bought about 12 years ago for their club to observe on.  The site, Starry Meadows, is located about 120 miles SW of Colorado Springs.  Lucky for me, Starry Meadows is a mere 34 miles from my hacienda in Westcliffe. 

 

If the weather forecast continues to improve I will pack up the 20” F5, if not I will take the 12” Orion XXG.

 

We had to replace the original Star Pod trailer, it lost a wheel and tore the axle up in Kentucky on the way out here, it was left in KY for repairs awaiting parts.  While waiting, someone offered to buy it, not wanting to drive back to KY and retrieve it after repairs we sold it.  The new Star Pod is a couple feet longer and has a pop out kitchen.  And it also sports a Star Pod CO license plate.

 

Once again Stewie (the Prozac dog) and I will be out among the stars, making new friends.

 

And if this goes well, the Okie-Tex star party is the first weekend in October!

 

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 

Gosh. it is so good to hear from all you boys. We used to have such fun at East Coast Star Party; truly a time gone by.


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


Star Party!

charles jagow
 

All,

 

I am heading out for the first star party I have attended since the last ECSP.  The RMSS, Rocky Mountain Star Stare in Gardner Colorado.  RMSS is held on a 35 acre site that the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society bought about 12 years ago for their club to observe on.  The site, Starry Meadows, is located about 120 miles SW of Colorado Springs.  Lucky for me, Starry Meadows is a mere 34 miles from my hacienda in Westcliffe. 

 

If the weather forecast continues to improve I will pack up the 20” F5, if not I will take the 12” Orion XXG.

 

We had to replace the original Star Pod trailer, it lost a wheel and tore the axle up in Kentucky on the way out here, it was left in KY for repairs awaiting parts.  While waiting, someone offered to buy it, not wanting to drive back to KY and retrieve it after repairs we sold it.  The new Star Pod is a couple feet longer and has a pop out kitchen.  And it also sports a Star Pod CO license plate.

 

Once again Stewie (the Prozac dog) and I will be out among the stars, making new friends.

 

And if this goes well, the Okie-Tex star party is the first weekend in October!

 

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 

Gosh. it is so good to hear from all you boys. We used to have such fun at East Coast Star Party; truly a time gone by.


--

v/r

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Member – Dark Skies of The Wet Mountain Valley

Member - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Member – San Diego Astronomy Association

Member – Colorado Springs Astronomy Association

Future         Verde Mont Observatory

Gone...        Rott'n Paws Observatory

 

 


Re: NGC7380 The Wizard

jimcoble2000
 

Dinosaurs man.........................Dinosaurs without mates.Emoji

On Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 08:10:27 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


Gosh. it is so good to hear from all you boys. We used to have such fun at East Coast Star Party; truly a time gone by.


Re: NGC7380 The Wizard

Kent Blackwell
 

Gosh. it is so good to hear from all you boys. We used to have such fun at East Coast Star Party; truly a time gone by.


Jupiter happenings

jimcoble2000
 

In request I will try to give a heads up for planet happenings.

Jupiter:

Saturday night around 2130 IO will be in shadow transit about midway off the face. Shadow begins 2030 and IO leaves the face around 2201 followed by it's shadow a bit later. It is always interesting to watch a moon come off the face of Jupiter. Jupiter is just past opposition on Aug 20th so the shadows follow the moon across the disc of the planet.


Re: NGC7380 The Wizard

Stu Beaber
 

Glad to see you back Ian...I took the spring and early summer off. Been idle since March and just started back about a week+ ago. Feels good!

Stu


On Mon, Aug 30, 2021 at 6:45 PM Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:
Well darkness is staring earlier these days so its imaging again for another season. First time since late spring so lots of boogers to deal with. Here's a rather feeble attempt at NGC7380. Still have some guiding issues to sort out but at least I got an image. Oh and yes Saturn and Jupiter have been lovely in the refactor.
Cheers
Ian
NGC7380


Re: NGC7380 The Wizard

jimcoble2000
 

Thanks Ian. Fine work. Another season is upon us.

On Monday, August 30, 2021, 06:45:17 PM EDT, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Well darkness is staring earlier these days so its imaging again for another season. First time since late spring so lots of boogers to deal with. Here's a rather feeble attempt at NGC7380. Still have some guiding issues to sort out but at least I got an image. Oh and yes Saturn and Jupiter have been lovely in the refactor.
Cheers
Ian
NGC7380


NGC7380 The Wizard

Ian Stewart
 

Well darkness is staring earlier these days so its imaging again for another season. First time since late spring so lots of boogers to deal with. Here's a rather feeble attempt at NGC7380. Still have some guiding issues to sort out but at least I got an image. Oh and yes Saturn and Jupiter have been lovely in the refactor.
Cheers
Ian
NGC7380


5” Explore Scientific APO and mount up for grabs

Richard Saunders
 

Hi folks!  I'm selling my Skywatcher EQ6-R mount.  It's new, never used, the tripod is still in an unopened box.  Reducing new price of $1649.00 by $150 as an "open box" discount.  Of course I also paid shipping and taxes that anyone locally purchasing it would also save, about $175, for a toal savings of about $825 off of an online order.   The EQ6-R is not available on-line, it's backordered. I waited 2 months when I ordered this one last fall.  The Explore Scientific ED 127 is in good condition and, like all ES refractors currently on the ES web-site, they are all out of stock as well.  Since my scope is used, I'm reducing the internet price at Explore Scientific of $1999.99 by $350 and of course you wouldn't pay the approximate $200 in shipping and taxes.  So, for both scope and mount, that would be $500 off a new online scope and mount purchase plus the shipping and handling of another $525 for a total savings of $1000.  If you've been thinking about a 5" refractor for observing or astrophotography, here's a great opportunity to get high quality mount and scope for $3150, about $1000 less than if you ordered them new online.  If you are wondering why I’m selling, I live in the woods and can’t just roll it out of the garage to observe.  Just too heavy to use a lot taking back and forth to dark sites.  Regards, Scott  rsaun58043@...


This seems good advise about seeing in general

jimcoble2000
 

The very best seeing often comes on still, muggy summer nights when the air is heavy with humidity and the sky looks unpromisingly milky with haze. Some astronomers claim that a blanket of industrial smog steadies the air as effectively as summer humidity — or rather that it results from the same tranquil air masses.

Time of night also plays a role, but again there are few universal rules. Right after sunset the seeing is apt to be excellent, so start your planetary observing as soon as you can find a planet in twilight. The seeing is apt to deteriorate before dusk fades out. Some observers find that their seeing improves after midnight; others say it goes to pieces. This depends largely on local topography; observers in valleys might get worse seeing as the night goes on and cold air flows down to pool in the valley. Just before sunrise may be another excellent time.

For observing the Sun (use an astronomer's solar filter!), the best time is early morning before the Sun heats the landscape. The very worst atmospheric seeing of the 24-hour daily cycle comes in the afternoon.

Geography is critical. Smooth, laminar airflow is the ideal sought by observatory-siting committees worldwide. The best sites on Earth are mountaintops facing into prevailing winds that have crossed thousands of miles of flat, cool ocean. You don't want to be downwind of a mountain; the airstream breaks up into turbulent swirls after crossing the peak. Nor do you want to be downwind of varied terrain that absorbs solar heat differently from one spot to the next. Flat, uniform plains or gently rolling hills extending far upwind can be almost as good as an ocean for providing laminar airflow. You may learn to predict which wind direction brings the best seeing to your observing site.


From S&T

I think the first paragraph is quite astute. Also as the humidity goes up the ability of the atmosphere to change temperature goes down as per my last post. See the "heat capacity of water". In fact when fog form the temperature of the atmosphere is "locked in". It can't change. You are at what is called an invariant point. Two states of matter are simultaneously present (gas and liquid) That is also why fog is great for planets if not your clothing and sanity. The air temp can't change until the sun starts to evaporate air moisture; then at lower water content the air temp can change again.


Re: Planets tonight

jimcoble2000
 

Upon further thought there may be cause. Seeing is often better when you are looking over bodies of water. That is well recognized. Many of the finest telescopes are arranged to take advantage of this. It is also very common on solar telescopes that have to contend with wide temperature and seeing changes during the day.

Why would this be? Well water has a high latent heat capacity. It has the ability to store large amounts of energy before it's temperature begins to rise. You have to distinguish heat energy and temperature to follow this. Heat is a form of energy. Temperature is a measure of molecular motion. Not the same. Anyways, water has a way of damping temperature changes as it can absorb or emit large amounts of energy but much more slowly. That's why the beach is warmer than inland during the winter or cooler during the summer. Water is a great thermostat and temperature moderator. This much is very well understood.

Now my idea (emphasis on my idea). Seeing is often dependent on homogeneous temperatures in layers of air. Homogeneous temps also translate into homogeneous air density. The high heat retention of urban areas may indeed serve as an analogy for the heat capacity of water. The urban areas may retain and release heat slowly,  over extended time and thus retard temp differences and so improve seeing conditions. As Ted can attest, if you live in a desert it is hot during the day but can be very cold at night. The desert has a lower heat capacity thus does not store heat as effectively as a ton of asphalt and roads. Rural areas also cool off more quickly than urban areas. If I wanted to look further I would look to daily temp records for urban heat islands versus close by rural areas. Auto density and the subsequent impact on air conditions may also have some input or not. That is a  lot more speculative.

Cloud cover may also affect this. Clear desert nights just transmit heat out of the ground very quickly. Hazy urban skies may actually provide a heat reflector and retain/retard ground heat re emission. This may stabilize temperature change and thus improve seeing.



On Monday, August 30, 2021, 09:03:26 AM EDT, Matthew Cook via groups.io <lt_mrcook@...> wrote:


You just can't beat the atmospheric seeing in city locations.”  

Any idea why this occurs?


On Aug 30, 2021, at 08:12, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

I agree with Mark. Wow, what a night! I set up the 5" refractor but after seeing how clear it was put the scope away and set up the 25". What abuse, huh? Was it worth it. You bet. Jupiter looked HUGE and brilliant at 450x. Saturn was the best I have ever seen it.

Although clouds were predicted Sunday night it turned out to be one of the best nights of the year. I rated the atmospheric seeing as 10/10. Saturn was, to coin a phrase, "The best I have ever seen." There seemed to be no limit to how much power I used, even with the 25" reflector.
 
Those who know me know I don't spend a lot of time looking at each object but this was an exception. Jupiter and Saturn looked amazing. Jupiter was HUGE and dazzlingly bright at 450x. You just can't beat the atmospheric seeing in city locations. As many times as I've seen Saturn in the 25" from Coinjock I've never seen it looks so incredible. Too bad the limiting magnitude is about 3.5 from the city, too bright for galaxy viewing but amazing for planets and double stars.
 
List: 21/08/29 VB 25���
 
 
Saturn
(Planet in Capricornus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 9:34:52 PM
Comment: I think this is the best i have ever seen Saturn in the 25".
You just can't beat city locations for great steady seeing. I learned
that long ago. Amazing how easy the sighting of Saturn's moons are. I
was able to see Tiran, Dione, Enceladus, Tethys, Rhea, Iapetus. Using a
8mm Radian (400x) the "record grooves" in the rings became apparent for
just a fleeting second. Probably the most impressive view was using a
12.5mm Volcano top University Optics Orthoscopic. Wow, even at 250x the
view was razor sharp. Using the 7mm University Optics HD (450x) the
Crepe Ring took on an almost purple color. I've never seen that before.
Using the 7mm Pentax I saw the Encke division as a distinct fine black
line at the edge of Ring A, rather than the softer appearance I
previously suspected.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 83�� H 77%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
NGC 7331
(Spiral Galaxy in Pegasus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:19:19 PM
Comment: Quite bright and highly elongated. Hardly comparable to how it
looks in a dark sky but very nice nevertheless
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Blue Snowball Nebula - NGC 7662
(Planetary Nebula in Andromeda)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:23:40 PM
Comment: Wow! The "CBS Eye" bright inner ring was easily visible using
the 7mm Pentax at 435x. At 635x the inner ring looked phophorus. With
the Pentax 3.5mm (900x) the inner ring was horseshoe shaped, and I
suspected seeing a central star
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Ring Nebula - M 57
(Planetary Nebula in Lyra)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:34:31 PM
Comment: With superb seeing this was an ideal night to try to see the
central star. Using the 5mm Pentax at 635x I saw it immediately, and
just as quickly it vanished. Relaxing for a second or two I saw it
again. I have found excellent seeing is as important or even more so
than dark skies.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Messier 30
(Globular Cluster in Capricornus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:41:59 PM
Comment: M 30 ia so interesting in the way 3 lomg arms extend outward. I
waa able to resolve it nearly to the core
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
NGC 7184
(Spiral Galaxy in Aquarius)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:45:19 PM
Comment: Large and faint low surface brightness 11th magnitude galaxy
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Messier 2
(Globular Cluster in Aquarius)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:46:42 PM
Comment: M 2 is an awesome globular cluster, and one that resolves to
the core
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Saturn Nebula - NGC 7009
(Planetary Nebula in Aquarius)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:49:41 PM
Comment: A spectacular view with the 5mm Pentax at 635x. The central
bulge does indeed look similar to Saturn's rings. The 3.5mm Pentax at
910x showed a bit more inner details.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Messier 15
(Globular Cluster in Pegasus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:56:04 PM
Comment: M 15 is one of my favorite globular clusters. The surface
brightness is very high and stars were spread across nearly half the
field of view at 200x.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Blue Flash Nebula - NGC 6905
(Planetary Nebula in Delphinus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 11:09:30 PM
Comment: Fairly large and round. Without a filter it's a bit fainter
than I expected. The Orion UltraBlock filter made all the diffence. It
is nearly round, with several bright as well as dark areas.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8


Re: Planets tonight

jimcoble2000
 

That is an excellent question and I doubt there is any definitive answer to this very subjective question either pro or con. On the face of it city, observing should be worse as urban areas are heat islands that absorb, store and release greater amounts of heat due to the extent artificial surfaces. I have observed for 17 years from a rural location and just as many years from an urban site. Having seen good and bad nights in both I would not give an opinion as it is far too subjective. Maybe you are so happy to see anything in urban area, it may seem to be better.

I doubt there is any good writing on this. I did a quick (very quick) look at the popular magazines and frankly they have so many conflicting information and outright nonsense that I think those won't be any help. I can say you can see more than you think from an urban location quite confidently. I have seen excellent seeing conditions at the right moments from the city but there were bad ones too. I will try to look further. Anyone know any sources? Seeing is often subject to micro level variability, within a few hundred feet and highly dependent on a ton of variables at small scale.  

On Monday, August 30, 2021, 09:03:26 AM EDT, Matthew Cook via groups.io <lt_mrcook@...> wrote:


You just can't beat the atmospheric seeing in city locations.”  

Any idea why this occurs?


On Aug 30, 2021, at 08:12, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

I agree with Mark. Wow, what a night! I set up the 5" refractor but after seeing how clear it was put the scope away and set up the 25". What abuse, huh? Was it worth it. You bet. Jupiter looked HUGE and brilliant at 450x. Saturn was the best I have ever seen it.

Although clouds were predicted Sunday night it turned out to be one of the best nights of the year. I rated the atmospheric seeing as 10/10. Saturn was, to coin a phrase, "The best I have ever seen." There seemed to be no limit to how much power I used, even with the 25" reflector.
 
Those who know me know I don't spend a lot of time looking at each object but this was an exception. Jupiter and Saturn looked amazing. Jupiter was HUGE and dazzlingly bright at 450x. You just can't beat the atmospheric seeing in city locations. As many times as I've seen Saturn in the 25" from Coinjock I've never seen it looks so incredible. Too bad the limiting magnitude is about 3.5 from the city, too bright for galaxy viewing but amazing for planets and double stars.
 
List: 21/08/29 VB 25���
 
 
Saturn
(Planet in Capricornus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 9:34:52 PM
Comment: I think this is the best i have ever seen Saturn in the 25".
You just can't beat city locations for great steady seeing. I learned
that long ago. Amazing how easy the sighting of Saturn's moons are. I
was able to see Tiran, Dione, Enceladus, Tethys, Rhea, Iapetus. Using a
8mm Radian (400x) the "record grooves" in the rings became apparent for
just a fleeting second. Probably the most impressive view was using a
12.5mm Volcano top University Optics Orthoscopic. Wow, even at 250x the
view was razor sharp. Using the 7mm University Optics HD (450x) the
Crepe Ring took on an almost purple color. I've never seen that before.
Using the 7mm Pentax I saw the Encke division as a distinct fine black
line at the edge of Ring A, rather than the softer appearance I
previously suspected.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 83�� H 77%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
NGC 7331
(Spiral Galaxy in Pegasus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:19:19 PM
Comment: Quite bright and highly elongated. Hardly comparable to how it
looks in a dark sky but very nice nevertheless
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Blue Snowball Nebula - NGC 7662
(Planetary Nebula in Andromeda)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:23:40 PM
Comment: Wow! The "CBS Eye" bright inner ring was easily visible using
the 7mm Pentax at 435x. At 635x the inner ring looked phophorus. With
the Pentax 3.5mm (900x) the inner ring was horseshoe shaped, and I
suspected seeing a central star
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Ring Nebula - M 57
(Planetary Nebula in Lyra)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:34:31 PM
Comment: With superb seeing this was an ideal night to try to see the
central star. Using the 5mm Pentax at 635x I saw it immediately, and
just as quickly it vanished. Relaxing for a second or two I saw it
again. I have found excellent seeing is as important or even more so
than dark skies.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Messier 30
(Globular Cluster in Capricornus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:41:59 PM
Comment: M 30 ia so interesting in the way 3 lomg arms extend outward. I
waa able to resolve it nearly to the core
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
NGC 7184
(Spiral Galaxy in Aquarius)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:45:19 PM
Comment: Large and faint low surface brightness 11th magnitude galaxy
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Messier 2
(Globular Cluster in Aquarius)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:46:42 PM
Comment: M 2 is an awesome globular cluster, and one that resolves to
the core
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Saturn Nebula - NGC 7009
(Planetary Nebula in Aquarius)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:49:41 PM
Comment: A spectacular view with the 5mm Pentax at 635x. The central
bulge does indeed look similar to Saturn's rings. The 3.5mm Pentax at
910x showed a bit more inner details.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Messier 15
(Globular Cluster in Pegasus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:56:04 PM
Comment: M 15 is one of my favorite globular clusters. The surface
brightness is very high and stars were spread across nearly half the
field of view at 200x.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Blue Flash Nebula - NGC 6905
(Planetary Nebula in Delphinus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 11:09:30 PM
Comment: Fairly large and round. Without a filter it's a bit fainter
than I expected. The Orion UltraBlock filter made all the diffence. It
is nearly round, with several bright as well as dark areas.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8


Re: Planets tonight

Matthew Cook
 

You just can't beat the atmospheric seeing in city locations.”  

Any idea why this occurs?


On Aug 30, 2021, at 08:12, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

I agree with Mark. Wow, what a night! I set up the 5" refractor but after seeing how clear it was put the scope away and set up the 25". What abuse, huh? Was it worth it. You bet. Jupiter looked HUGE and brilliant at 450x. Saturn was the best I have ever seen it.

Although clouds were predicted Sunday night it turned out to be one of the best nights of the year. I rated the atmospheric seeing as 10/10. Saturn was, to coin a phrase, "The best I have ever seen." There seemed to be no limit to how much power I used, even with the 25" reflector.
 
Those who know me know I don't spend a lot of time looking at each object but this was an exception. Jupiter and Saturn looked amazing. Jupiter was HUGE and dazzlingly bright at 450x. You just can't beat the atmospheric seeing in city locations. As many times as I've seen Saturn in the 25" from Coinjock I've never seen it looks so incredible. Too bad the limiting magnitude is about 3.5 from the city, too bright for galaxy viewing but amazing for planets and double stars.
 
List: 21/08/29 VB 25���
 
 
Saturn
(Planet in Capricornus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 9:34:52 PM
Comment: I think this is the best i have ever seen Saturn in the 25".
You just can't beat city locations for great steady seeing. I learned
that long ago. Amazing how easy the sighting of Saturn's moons are. I
was able to see Tiran, Dione, Enceladus, Tethys, Rhea, Iapetus. Using a
8mm Radian (400x) the "record grooves" in the rings became apparent for
just a fleeting second. Probably the most impressive view was using a
12.5mm Volcano top University Optics Orthoscopic. Wow, even at 250x the
view was razor sharp. Using the 7mm University Optics HD (450x) the
Crepe Ring took on an almost purple color. I've never seen that before.
Using the 7mm Pentax I saw the Encke division as a distinct fine black
line at the edge of Ring A, rather than the softer appearance I
previously suspected.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 83�� H 77%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
NGC 7331
(Spiral Galaxy in Pegasus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:19:19 PM
Comment: Quite bright and highly elongated. Hardly comparable to how it
looks in a dark sky but very nice nevertheless
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Blue Snowball Nebula - NGC 7662
(Planetary Nebula in Andromeda)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:23:40 PM
Comment: Wow! The "CBS Eye" bright inner ring was easily visible using
the 7mm Pentax at 435x. At 635x the inner ring looked phophorus. With
the Pentax 3.5mm (900x) the inner ring was horseshoe shaped, and I
suspected seeing a central star
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Ring Nebula - M 57
(Planetary Nebula in Lyra)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:34:31 PM
Comment: With superb seeing this was an ideal night to try to see the
central star. Using the 5mm Pentax at 635x I saw it immediately, and
just as quickly it vanished. Relaxing for a second or two I saw it
again. I have found excellent seeing is as important or even more so
than dark skies.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Messier 30
(Globular Cluster in Capricornus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:41:59 PM
Comment: M 30 ia so interesting in the way 3 lomg arms extend outward. I
waa able to resolve it nearly to the core
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
NGC 7184
(Spiral Galaxy in Aquarius)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:45:19 PM
Comment: Large and faint low surface brightness 11th magnitude galaxy
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Messier 2
(Globular Cluster in Aquarius)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:46:42 PM
Comment: M 2 is an awesome globular cluster, and one that resolves to
the core
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Saturn Nebula - NGC 7009
(Planetary Nebula in Aquarius)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:49:41 PM
Comment: A spectacular view with the 5mm Pentax at 635x. The central
bulge does indeed look similar to Saturn's rings. The 3.5mm Pentax at
910x showed a bit more inner details.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Messier 15
(Globular Cluster in Pegasus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:56:04 PM
Comment: M 15 is one of my favorite globular clusters. The surface
brightness is very high and stars were spread across nearly half the
field of view at 200x.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Blue Flash Nebula - NGC 6905
(Planetary Nebula in Delphinus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 11:09:30 PM
Comment: Fairly large and round. Without a filter it's a bit fainter
than I expected. The Orion UltraBlock filter made all the diffence. It
is nearly round, with several bright as well as dark areas.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8


Re: Planets tonight

jimcoble2000
 

WARNING: for those on the list who are not familiar with Kent, you have to take the statement "the best I've ever seen" with a certain grain of salt as there is a significant body of evidence for the  overuse of the words "best I've ever seen" coming from this source. Emoji

(Actually a humongous body of evidence)


On Monday, August 30, 2021, 08:12:25 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


I agree with Mark. Wow, what a night! I set up the 5" refractor but after seeing how clear it was put the scope away and set up the 25". What abuse, huh? Was it worth it. You bet. Jupiter looked HUGE and brilliant at 450x. Saturn was the best I have ever seen it.

Although clouds were predicted Sunday night it turned out to be one of the best nights of the year. I rated the atmospheric seeing as 10/10. Saturn was, to coin a phrase, "The best I have ever seen." There seemed to be no limit to how much power I used, even with the 25" reflector.
 
Those who know me know I don't spend a lot of time looking at each object but this was an exception. Jupiter and Saturn looked amazing. Jupiter was HUGE and dazzlingly bright at 450x. You just can't beat the atmospheric seeing in city locations. As many times as I've seen Saturn in the 25" from Coinjock I've never seen it looks so incredible. Too bad the limiting magnitude is about 3.5 from the city, too bright for galaxy viewing but amazing for planets and double stars.
 
List: 21/08/29 VB 25���
 
 
Saturn
(Planet in Capricornus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 9:34:52 PM
Comment: I think this is the best i have ever seen Saturn in the 25".
You just can't beat city locations for great steady seeing. I learned
that long ago. Amazing how easy the sighting of Saturn's moons are. I
was able to see Tiran, Dione, Enceladus, Tethys, Rhea, Iapetus. Using a
8mm Radian (400x) the "record grooves" in the rings became apparent for
just a fleeting second. Probably the most impressive view was using a
12.5mm Volcano top University Optics Orthoscopic. Wow, even at 250x the
view was razor sharp. Using the 7mm University Optics HD (450x) the
Crepe Ring took on an almost purple color. I've never seen that before.
Using the 7mm Pentax I saw the Encke division as a distinct fine black
line at the edge of Ring A, rather than the softer appearance I
previously suspected.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 83�� H 77%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
NGC 7331
(Spiral Galaxy in Pegasus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:19:19 PM
Comment: Quite bright and highly elongated. Hardly comparable to how it
looks in a dark sky but very nice nevertheless
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Blue Snowball Nebula - NGC 7662
(Planetary Nebula in Andromeda)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:23:40 PM
Comment: Wow! The "CBS Eye" bright inner ring was easily visible using
the 7mm Pentax at 435x. At 635x the inner ring looked phophorus. With
the Pentax 3.5mm (900x) the inner ring was horseshoe shaped, and I
suspected seeing a central star
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Ring Nebula - M 57
(Planetary Nebula in Lyra)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:34:31 PM
Comment: With superb seeing this was an ideal night to try to see the
central star. Using the 5mm Pentax at 635x I saw it immediately, and
just as quickly it vanished. Relaxing for a second or two I saw it
again. I have found excellent seeing is as important or even more so
than dark skies.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Messier 30
(Globular Cluster in Capricornus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:41:59 PM
Comment: M 30 ia so interesting in the way 3 lomg arms extend outward. I
waa able to resolve it nearly to the core
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
NGC 7184
(Spiral Galaxy in Aquarius)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:45:19 PM
Comment: Large and faint low surface brightness 11th magnitude galaxy
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Messier 2
(Globular Cluster in Aquarius)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:46:42 PM
Comment: M 2 is an awesome globular cluster, and one that resolves to
the core
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Saturn Nebula - NGC 7009
(Planetary Nebula in Aquarius)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:49:41 PM
Comment: A spectacular view with the 5mm Pentax at 635x. The central
bulge does indeed look similar to Saturn's rings. The 3.5mm Pentax at
910x showed a bit more inner details.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Messier 15
(Globular Cluster in Pegasus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 10:56:04 PM
Comment: M 15 is one of my favorite globular clusters. The surface
brightness is very high and stars were spread across nearly half the
field of view at 200x.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8
 
Blue Flash Nebula - NGC 6905
(Planetary Nebula in Delphinus)
Observed: Aug 29, 2021 at 11:09:30 PM
Comment: Fairly large and round. Without a filter it's a bit fainter
than I expected. The Orion UltraBlock filter made all the diffence. It
is nearly round, with several bright as well as dark areas.
Location: Virginia Beach SQML 18.4, 76�� H 87%
Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler
Seeing: 10
Transparency: 8

741 - 760 of 53844