Date   

Re: Three extraordinary planet nights

Ted Forte
 

Remarkable observation Mark.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, August 26, 2021 5:04 AM
To: kentblackwell <kent@...>; Roy Diffrient <mail@...>; BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>; kurt.melow@...
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Three extraordinary planet nights

 

For the past three nights the seeing has been excellent to perfect as of last night. Kent and I spent about 9 total hours observing Saturn and Jupiter. While the first two nights were quite good, last night was one of the best nights for observing planets in the past two years. Under fairly warm skies with up to 90% humidity. There were only a few passing clouds. This offered the possibility of exceptional solar system observation and it did not disappoint.

 

Saturn was observed with two 5 inch refractors and a wide variety of eyepieces and combinations. By ten in the evening, we had spent about an hour and a half of observing the ringed planet. Planet bands were excellent but the rings put on the show last night. Under fairly high power we were able to distinguish not only the usual Cassini division we were able to detect the Enke division which is much smaller and requires considerable power and seeing. Most of the time you sensed it but at the best of moments in seeing, we both could distinguish the gap for a fleeting second. This was under perfect seeing mind you. This is when the rings look like grooves in an old LP record. I have done this one or two times previously. Both times we were using 268 to 300x. We also saw five moons even under suburban skies. The C ring was obvious also.

 

But the best and what I consider our  finest observation was yet to come.

 

Around 1020 we shifted to Jupiter which was now high enough to do good work. I will skip the usual observations, fine as they were, and get to the best observation of my multi decade career of observation. I know it was a high point for Kent also.

 

By happy coincidence two of Jupiter's moons were in a very close conjunction. Io and Ganymede were within 2.5 arc seconds of each other. This offered the opportunity to achieve comparative close observations of the two moons. The other happy consequence was that these two moons are a study in contrasts. The first thing you noticed at 300X was the significant size difference as the two moons were next to each other, resembling a close double star. Normally you can distinguish size differences on any good night of looking at the 4 main satellites of Jupiter but it really becomes obvious at such close separation. But the real highlight was this.

 

The best coincidence of the conjunction is that Io is the most volcanic body in the solar system. It is dominated by vulcanism repaving itself constantly. It has few craters, a universal feature of solar system bodies that are not gas giants. It is also distinctly yellow/orange in photos. Ganymede is quite bright with some dark regions. Overall it has a fairly high reflectance or albedo due to icy it's composition.

 

It occurred to me this might be the chance to use very high powers, 700X, to see if this difference in the moons could be detected. Close proximity, perfect seeing, and high powers offered a chance at an unusual opportunity. I cranked it up the 700x using a 1.6mm Vixen. I was thrilled to see the difference in color instantly. Io was a distinct orange in contrast to a bluish white tint of Ganymede. I called Kent over to observe without telling him what we were doing. As he looked I asked him "quick, what are the colors"? He nailed it instantly. We both have a lot of experience in subtle double star colors so Kent was an ideal test bed.  He had no hesitation in the observation. We had actually seen color and albedo difference in what are always just white orbs during normal observing. Combined circumstance allowed us to make what I personally consider my best, or at least extraordinary, observation visually ever.  What a climax to three excellent planet nights.


Re: Three extraordinary planet nights

Roy Diffrient
 

Thanks Mark – sounds like a great one.

Roy


On Aug 26, 2021, at 8:03 AM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


For the past three nights the seeing has been excellent to perfect as of last night. Kent and I spent about 9 total hours observing Saturn and Jupiter. While the first two nights were quite good, last night was one of the best nights for observing planets in the past two years. Under fairly warm skies with up to 90% humidity. There were only a few passing clouds. This offered the possibility of exceptional solar system observation and it did not disappoint.

Saturn was observed with two 5 inch refractors and a wide variety of eyepieces and combinations. By ten in the evening, we had spent about an hour and a half of observing the ringed planet. Planet bands were excellent but the rings put on the show last night. Under fairly high power we were able to distinguish not only the usual Cassini division we were able to detect the Enke division which is much smaller and requires considerable power and seeing. Most of the time you sensed it but at the best of moments in seeing, we both could distinguish the gap for a fleeting second. This was under perfect seeing mind you. This is when the rings look like grooves in an old LP record. I have done this one or two times previously. Both times we were using 268 to 300x. We also saw five moons even under suburban skies. The C ring was obvious also.

But the best and what I consider our  finest observation was yet to come.

Around 1020 we shifted to Jupiter which was now high enough to do good work. I will skip the usual observations, fine as they were, and get to the best observation of my multi decade career of observation. I know it was a high point for Kent also.

By happy coincidence two of Jupiter's moons were in a very close conjunction. Io and Ganymede were within 2.5 arc seconds of each other. This offered the opportunity to achieve comparative close observations of the two moons. The other happy consequence was that these two moons are a study in contrasts. The first thing you noticed at 300X was the significant size difference as the two moons were next to each other, resembling a close double star. Normally you can distinguish size differences on any good night of looking at the 4 main satellites of Jupiter but it really becomes obvious at such close separation. But the real highlight was this.

The best coincidence of the conjunction is that Io is the most volcanic body in the solar system. It is dominated by vulcanism repaving itself constantly. It has few craters, a universal feature of solar system bodies that are not gas giants. It is also distinctly yellow/orange in photos. Ganymede is quite bright with some dark regions. Overall it has a fairly high reflectance or albedo due to icy it's composition.

It occurred to me this might be the chance to use very high powers, 700X, to see if this difference in the moons could be detected. Close proximity, perfect seeing, and high powers offered a chance at an unusual opportunity. I cranked it up the 700x using a 1.6mm Vixen. I was thrilled to see the difference in color instantly. Io was a distinct orange in contrast to a bluish white tint of Ganymede. I called Kent over to observe without telling him what we were doing. As he looked I asked him "quick, what are the colors"? He nailed it instantly. We both have a lot of experience in subtle double star colors so Kent was an ideal test bed.  He had no hesitation in the observation. We had actually seen color and albedo difference in what are always just white orbs during normal observing. Combined circumstance allowed us to make what I personally consider my best, or at least extraordinary, observation visually ever.  What a climax to three excellent planet nights.


Re: Three extraordinary planet nights

jimcoble2000
 

Yup your estimate was pretty close. There must have been a bit of sweat in your eyes so that would account for the 0.1 arc second errorEmoji That is the experience in doubles speaking. Great visual estimate.

I agree on the Enke. Most time it was just an impression of darkening within the A ring though I think in one or two moments it resolved, much like doing sub arc second stars. I have found that your impressions are a good clue in marginal settings. After that verification by independent observation is the best assurance. Lowell could have desperately used that practice concerning his canals of Mars. I checked the magnitude of all the Saturn's moons last night after getting back using Sky Tools. The ones we saw were certainly within the range of visibility and the one that may be questionable (5th) could just barely fit the bill of visible.

Interestingly, we now are perfectly matched for focus after my eye surgery. Previously when we shared scopes I had to re focus from where Kent had set it. Now there is no requirement to adjust.

We are now... par focal...........is that a bad word?Emoji

Of course to be ideal I should get my ophthalmologist to set my eyes 3 inches deeper in my noggin to duplicate Kent.....................but then on second thought we really don't need two Mr. Blackwells. I also wonder if we could have done the Jovian moon's colors with my old eyes. Maybe not.

On Thursday, August 26, 2021, 08:55:35 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


It was indeed a great night for planets. The details visible in Saturn's rings were astonishing. I also observed several double stars, some with considerable color contrasts as well as several with magnitude contrasts.

The Crepe Ring was fairly easy, but required at least 200x to see it. Encke's Division, that's another story. I'm not 100% certain I saw it, but certainly saw a darkening in the A Ring. We both confirmed 4 moons.

Jupiter looked amazing as well. It's too bad the GRS was not visible. I've noticed it has weakened considerably since the past two years when it was as dark red as I have ever seen it.

It was interesting to see Io and Ganymede so close together, I estimated about a 2.5" split. Checking SkySafari they were actually 2.6". Oh my, I was off 0.1", I must be slipping.

Kent

--- jimcoble2000@... wrote:

From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>
To: kentblackwell <kent@...>, Roy Diffrient <mail@...>, BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>, "Kurt.Melow@..." <kurt.melow@...>
Subject: Three extraordinary planet nights
Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2021 12:03:30 +0000 (UTC)

For the past three nights the seeing has been excellent to perfect as of last night. Kent and I spent about 9 total hours observing Saturn and Jupiter. While the first two nights were quite good, last night was one of the best nights for observing planets in the past two years. Under fairly warm skies with up to 90% humidity. There were only a few passing clouds. This offered the possibility of exceptional solar system observation and it did not disappoint.

Saturn was observed with two 5 inch refractors and a wide variety of eyepieces and combinations. By ten in the evening, we had spent about an hour and a half of observing the ringed planet. Planet bands were excellent but the rings put on the show last night. Under fairly high power we were able to distinguish not only the usual Cassini division we were able to detect the Enke division which is much smaller and requires considerable power and seeing. Most of the time you sensed it but at the best of moments in seeing, we both could distinguish the gap for a fleeting second. This was under perfect seeing mind you. This is when the rings look like grooves in an old LP record. I have done this one or two times previously. Both times we were using 268 to 300x. We also saw five moons even under suburban skies. The C ring was obvious also.

But the best and what I consider our  finest observation was yet to come.

Around 1020 we shifted to Jupiter which was now high enough to do good work. I will skip the usual observations, fine as they were, and get to the best observation of my multi decade career of observation. I know it was a high point for Kent also.

By happy coincidence two of Jupiter's moons were in a very close conjunction. Io and Ganymede were within 2.5 arc seconds of each other. This offered the opportunity to achieve comparative close observations of the two moons. The other happy consequence was that these two moons are a study in contrasts. The first thing you noticed at 300X was the significant size difference as the two moons were next to each other, resembling a close double star. Normally you can distinguish size differences on any good night of looking at the 4 main satellites of Jupiter but it really becomes obvious at such close separation. But the real highlight was this.

The best coincidence of the conjunction is that Io is the most volcanic body in the solar system. It is dominated by vulcanism repaving itself constantly. It has few craters, a universal feature of solar system bodies that are not gas giants. It is also distinctly yellow/orange in photos. Ganymede is quite bright with some dark regions. Overall it has a fairly high reflectance or albedo due to icy it's composition.

It occurred to me this might be the chance to use very high powers, 700X, to see if this difference in the moons could be detected. Close proximity, perfect seeing, and high powers offered a chance at an unusual opportunity. I cranked it up the 700x using a 1.6mm Vixen. I was thrilled to see the difference in color instantly. Io was a distinct orange in contrast to a bluish white tint of Ganymede. I called Kent over to observe without telling him what we were doing. As he looked I asked him "quick, what are the colors"? He nailed it instantly. We both have a lot of experience in subtle double star colors so Kent was an ideal test bed.  He had no hesitation in the observation. We had actually seen color and albedo difference in what are always just white orbs during normal observing. Combined circumstance allowed us to make what I personally consider my best, or at least extraordinary, observation visually ever.  What a climax to three excellent planet nights.


Re: Three extraordinary planet nights

Kent Blackwell
 

It was indeed a great night for planets. The details visible in Saturn's rings were astonishing. I also observed several double stars, some with considerable color contrasts as well as several with magnitude contrasts.

The Crepe Ring was fairly easy, but required at least 200x to see it. Encke's Division, that's another story. I'm not 100% certain I saw it, but certainly saw a darkening in the A Ring. We both confirmed 4 moons.

Jupiter looked amazing as well. It's too bad the GRS was not visible. I've noticed it has weakened considerably since the past two years when it was as dark red as I have ever seen it.

It was interesting to see Io and Ganymede so close together, I estimated about a 2.5" split. Checking SkySafari they were actually 2.6". Oh my, I was off 0.1", I must be slipping.

Kent

--- jimcoble2000@... wrote:

From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>
To: kentblackwell <kent@...>, Roy Diffrient <mail@...>, BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>, "Kurt.Melow@..." <kurt.melow@...>
Subject: Three extraordinary planet nights
Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2021 12:03:30 +0000 (UTC)

For the past three nights the seeing has been excellent to perfect as of last night. Kent and I spent about 9 total hours observing Saturn and Jupiter. While the first two nights were quite good, last night was one of the best nights for observing planets in the past two years. Under fairly warm skies with up to 90% humidity. There were only a few passing clouds. This offered the possibility of exceptional solar system observation and it did not disappoint.

Saturn was observed with two 5 inch refractors and a wide variety of eyepieces and combinations. By ten in the evening, we had spent about an hour and a half of observing the ringed planet. Planet bands were excellent but the rings put on the show last night. Under fairly high power we were able to distinguish not only the usual Cassini division we were able to detect the Enke division which is much smaller and requires considerable power and seeing. Most of the time you sensed it but at the best of moments in seeing, we both could distinguish the gap for a fleeting second. This was under perfect seeing mind you. This is when the rings look like grooves in an old LP record. I have done this one or two times previously. Both times we were using 268 to 300x. We also saw five moons even under suburban skies. The C ring was obvious also.

But the best and what I consider our  finest observation was yet to come.

Around 1020 we shifted to Jupiter which was now high enough to do good work. I will skip the usual observations, fine as they were, and get to the best observation of my multi decade career of observation. I know it was a high point for Kent also.

By happy coincidence two of Jupiter's moons were in a very close conjunction. Io and Ganymede were within 2.5 arc seconds of each other. This offered the opportunity to achieve comparative close observations of the two moons. The other happy consequence was that these two moons are a study in contrasts. The first thing you noticed at 300X was the significant size difference as the two moons were next to each other, resembling a close double star. Normally you can distinguish size differences on any good night of looking at the 4 main satellites of Jupiter but it really becomes obvious at such close separation. But the real highlight was this.

The best coincidence of the conjunction is that Io is the most volcanic body in the solar system. It is dominated by vulcanism repaving itself constantly. It has few craters, a universal feature of solar system bodies that are not gas giants. It is also distinctly yellow/orange in photos. Ganymede is quite bright with some dark regions. Overall it has a fairly high reflectance or albedo due to icy it's composition.

It occurred to me this might be the chance to use very high powers, 700X, to see if this difference in the moons could be detected. Close proximity, perfect seeing, and high powers offered a chance at an unusual opportunity. I cranked it up the 700x using a 1.6mm Vixen. I was thrilled to see the difference in color instantly. Io was a distinct orange in contrast to a bluish white tint of Ganymede. I called Kent over to observe without telling him what we were doing. As he looked I asked him "quick, what are the colors"? He nailed it instantly. We both have a lot of experience in subtle double star colors so Kent was an ideal test bed.  He had no hesitation in the observation. We had actually seen color and albedo difference in what are always just white orbs during normal observing. Combined circumstance allowed us to make what I personally consider my best, or at least extraordinary, observation visually ever.  What a climax to three excellent planet nights.


Re: Three extraordinary planet nights

Ian Stewart
 

Great report Mark thanks for sharing.

On 8/26/2021 8:03 AM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io wrote:
For the past three nights the seeing has been excellent to perfect as of last night. Kent and I spent about 9 total hours observing Saturn and Jupiter. While the first two nights were quite good, last night was one of the best nights for observing planets in the past two years. Under fairly warm skies with up to 90% humidity. There were only a few passing clouds. This offered the possibility of exceptional solar system observation and it did not disappoint.

Saturn was observed with two 5 inch refractors and a wide variety of eyepieces and combinations. By ten in the evening, we had spent about an hour and a half of observing the ringed planet. Planet bands were excellent but the rings put on the show last night. Under fairly high power we were able to distinguish not only the usual Cassini division we were able to detect the Enke division which is much smaller and requires considerable power and seeing. Most of the time you sensed it but at the best of moments in seeing, we both could distinguish the gap for a fleeting second. This was under perfect seeing mind you. This is when the rings look like grooves in an old LP record. I have done this one or two times previously. Both times we were using 268 to 300x. We also saw five moons even under suburban skies. The C ring was obvious also.

But the best and what I consider our  finest observation was yet to come.

Around 1020 we shifted to Jupiter which was now high enough to do good work. I will skip the usual observations, fine as they were, and get to the best observation of my multi decade career of observation. I know it was a high point for Kent also.

By happy coincidence two of Jupiter's moons were in a very close conjunction. Io and Ganymede were within 2.5 arc seconds of each other. This offered the opportunity to achieve comparative close observations of the two moons. The other happy consequence was that these two moons are a study in contrasts. The first thing you noticed at 300X was the significant size difference as the two moons were next to each other, resembling a close double star. Normally you can distinguish size differences on any good night of looking at the 4 main satellites of Jupiter but it really becomes obvious at such close separation. But the real highlight was this.

The best coincidence of the conjunction is that Io is the most volcanic body in the solar system. It is dominated by vulcanism repaving itself constantly. It has few craters, a universal feature of solar system bodies that are not gas giants. It is also distinctly yellow/orange in photos. Ganymede is quite bright with some dark regions. Overall it has a fairly high reflectance or albedo due to icy it's composition.

It occurred to me this might be the chance to use very high powers, 700X, to see if this difference in the moons could be detected. Close proximity, perfect seeing, and high powers offered a chance at an unusual opportunity. I cranked it up the 700x using a 1.6mm Vixen. I was thrilled to see the difference in color instantly. Io was a distinct orange in contrast to a bluish white tint of Ganymede. I called Kent over to observe without telling him what we were doing. As he looked I asked him "quick, what are the colors"? He nailed it instantly. We both have a lot of experience in subtle double star colors so Kent was an ideal test bed.  He had no hesitation in the observation. We had actually seen color and albedo difference in what are always just white orbs during normal observing. Combined circumstance allowed us to make what I personally consider my best, or at least extraordinary, observation visually ever.  What a climax to three excellent planet nights.


Three extraordinary planet nights

jimcoble2000
 

For the past three nights the seeing has been excellent to perfect as of last night. Kent and I spent about 9 total hours observing Saturn and Jupiter. While the first two nights were quite good, last night was one of the best nights for observing planets in the past two years. Under fairly warm skies with up to 90% humidity. There were only a few passing clouds. This offered the possibility of exceptional solar system observation and it did not disappoint.

Saturn was observed with two 5 inch refractors and a wide variety of eyepieces and combinations. By ten in the evening, we had spent about an hour and a half of observing the ringed planet. Planet bands were excellent but the rings put on the show last night. Under fairly high power we were able to distinguish not only the usual Cassini division we were able to detect the Enke division which is much smaller and requires considerable power and seeing. Most of the time you sensed it but at the best of moments in seeing, we both could distinguish the gap for a fleeting second. This was under perfect seeing mind you. This is when the rings look like grooves in an old LP record. I have done this one or two times previously. Both times we were using 268 to 300x. We also saw five moons even under suburban skies. The C ring was obvious also.

But the best and what I consider our  finest observation was yet to come.

Around 1020 we shifted to Jupiter which was now high enough to do good work. I will skip the usual observations, fine as they were, and get to the best observation of my multi decade career of observation. I know it was a high point for Kent also.

By happy coincidence two of Jupiter's moons were in a very close conjunction. Io and Ganymede were within 2.5 arc seconds of each other. This offered the opportunity to achieve comparative close observations of the two moons. The other happy consequence was that these two moons are a study in contrasts. The first thing you noticed at 300X was the significant size difference as the two moons were next to each other, resembling a close double star. Normally you can distinguish size differences on any good night of looking at the 4 main satellites of Jupiter but it really becomes obvious at such close separation. But the real highlight was this.

The best coincidence of the conjunction is that Io is the most volcanic body in the solar system. It is dominated by vulcanism repaving itself constantly. It has few craters, a universal feature of solar system bodies that are not gas giants. It is also distinctly yellow/orange in photos. Ganymede is quite bright with some dark regions. Overall it has a fairly high reflectance or albedo due to icy it's composition.

It occurred to me this might be the chance to use very high powers, 700X, to see if this difference in the moons could be detected. Close proximity, perfect seeing, and high powers offered a chance at an unusual opportunity. I cranked it up the 700x using a 1.6mm Vixen. I was thrilled to see the difference in color instantly. Io was a distinct orange in contrast to a bluish white tint of Ganymede. I called Kent over to observe without telling him what we were doing. As he looked I asked him "quick, what are the colors"? He nailed it instantly. We both have a lot of experience in subtle double star colors so Kent was an ideal test bed.  He had no hesitation in the observation. We had actually seen color and albedo difference in what are always just white orbs during normal observing. Combined circumstance allowed us to make what I personally consider my best, or at least extraordinary, observation visually ever.  What a climax to three excellent planet nights.


Re: SUN Day cancelled, but Navy campout is still on.

jimcoble2000
 

tonight I think

On Saturday, August 21, 2021, 08:25:19 PM EDT, Jim Tallman <jctallman@...> wrote:


And the date is???


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
Get Outlook for Android


Re: SUN Day cancelled, but Navy campout is still on.

Jim Tallman
 

And the date is???


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
Get Outlook for Android


Fw: Astronomy event tonight at Norfolk Naval Base

George Reynolds
 


Subject: Astronomy event tonight at Norfolk Naval Base

Chloe,

There is a Navy campout tonight at Norfolk Naval Base, and they have asked the BBAA to bring telescopes.  Are you willing and /or able to come?  If so, you can set up about 7 pm.  

You will need access to the naval base.  If you don't have military or retired ID, let me know ASAP.

(Sorry for the last-minute notification, I had forgotten about it.)

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


SUN Day cancelled, but Navy campout is still on.

George Reynolds
 

Sorry to say, the clouds will keep us from seeing the Sun today, so the Sun Day event at Elizabeth River Park is cancelled.

OTOH, the "Great Navy Campout" at Breezy Point Park on the Norfolk Naval Base is still on the schedule.  They expect about 75, and we need three volunteers to bring telescopes.  Please go to the event in the calendar and RSVP.  

Sunset is 7:49 pm, so plan to set up around 7:30.  Unfortunately, the Moon will be nearly Full, but we should be able to see the planets Saturn and Jupiter, and some of the brighter stars, double stars, and constellations.

Access to the Naval Base is required, so if you want to come, but don't have a military or retired ID, call me at 757-332-0773 and let me know.  I will have the event contact person meet you at the NEX gas station parking lot.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Re: NSN Down for Security Issue

Shawn Loescher
 

Hello NSN member clubs,
 
The Night Sky Network website is now back online at https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov as of Friday evening, August 20. After some long troubleshooting sessions service is fully restored, and we can confirm all user data is safe and secure. We have details below.
 
Starting Wednesday afternoon JPL's security systems picked up some potentially suspicious activity on the Night Sky Network website. After thorough analysis this potential threat was found to be a false positive, but several changes needed to be made to help prevent a false positive alert or worse, which would result in the site being locked down again.
 
We apologize again for this downtime, and we sincerely hope that this will be the last prolonged outage for quite some time!
 
Dave Prosper and the NSN Team 
 
Administrator, NASA Night Sky Network (NSN)



Re: Polar Alignment

William Rust
 

I can probably do that in October.  Oh, by the way, I am not trying to compete with out of the box equipment and software.  I just did the math and field tested it.  It works pretty well.  It is a big improvement over the old-style drift method.
Bill


From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Jeff Goldstein <jeffgold1@...>
Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2021 7:40 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Polar Alignment
 

I like the idea! Perhaps a “mini presentation 10 minute” at the next club meeting?  Just my $0.02

 

Jeff G.

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of William Rust
Sent: Wednesday, August 18, 2021 5:38 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Polar Alignment

 

Hi everybody.  The Pandemic gave me some incentive to finish an astrojob sitting on my desk waiting for me to polish it up.  I did that in March, and submitted my article to Amateur Astronomy Magazine, Summer 2021.  The title is: "Robust Polar Alignment with Flatness Application".  It works pretty fast (say 45 min for 3 sets of star sightings) to get to about 0.5 arcmin error in Altitude and Azimuth. Anyway,  Anything closer that that requires more sightings and is very tricky.  I thought I would share.  If you do astroimaging, then this would be a technique that might benefit you. I can send you a copy if you dont get AAM.
Bill


Re: Polar Alignment

Jim Tallman
 

PHD2 does a very good job of it also. But Bill's approach sound interesting ;)

Jim

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
Get Outlook for Android


Re: Polar Alignment

Stu Beaber
 

If you're imaging, you probably have a computer in the mix anyway. I like Polemaster for polar alignment. It's a QHYCCD camera that you use for really good alignment. The first time you use it, it might take 10 minutes while you read the on screen instructions...after that if it takes more than 3 or 4 minutes, you must have taken a nap.

Oh...and you can even image with it if you care to...

Stu


On Thu, Aug 19, 2021 at 7:40 PM Jeff Goldstein <jeffgold1@...> wrote:

I like the idea! Perhaps a “mini presentation 10 minute” at the next club meeting?  Just my $0.02

 

Jeff G.

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of William Rust
Sent: Wednesday, August 18, 2021 5:38 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Polar Alignment

 

Hi everybody.  The Pandemic gave me some incentive to finish an astrojob sitting on my desk waiting for me to polish it up.  I did that in March, and submitted my article to Amateur Astronomy Magazine, Summer 2021.  The title is: "Robust Polar Alignment with Flatness Application".  It works pretty fast (say 45 min for 3 sets of star sightings) to get to about 0.5 arcmin error in Altitude and Azimuth. Anyway,  Anything closer that that requires more sightings and is very tricky.  I thought I would share.  If you do astroimaging, then this would be a technique that might benefit you. I can send you a copy if you dont get AAM.
Bill


Re: Polar Alignment

Jeff Goldstein
 

I like the idea! Perhaps a “mini presentation 10 minute” at the next club meeting?  Just my $0.02

 

Jeff G.

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of William Rust
Sent: Wednesday, August 18, 2021 5:38 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Polar Alignment

 

Hi everybody.  The Pandemic gave me some incentive to finish an astrojob sitting on my desk waiting for me to polish it up.  I did that in March, and submitted my article to Amateur Astronomy Magazine, Summer 2021.  The title is: "Robust Polar Alignment with Flatness Application".  It works pretty fast (say 45 min for 3 sets of star sightings) to get to about 0.5 arcmin error in Altitude and Azimuth. Anyway,  Anything closer that that requires more sightings and is very tricky.  I thought I would share.  If you do astroimaging, then this would be a technique that might benefit you. I can send you a copy if you dont get AAM.
Bill


NSN Down for Security Issue

Shawn Loescher
 

For your information:


Hello Night Sky Network clubs,

The Night Sky Network website is currently down as the NASA security team investigates a potential security issue with the NSN website. As they investigate they locked the site behind a firewall until the problem has been resolved.

Unfortunately, we expect this downtime to last at least a day, and possibly longer, pending the results of the team's investigation. Thankfully, initial analysis indicates that no data was compromised, and all member data is safe during this time. We expect to have more solid information and next steps by sometime late this evening, or early tomorrow morning.

 The issue was discovered Wednesday afternoon and the site was firewalled that evening. You all have our hugest apologies for this downtime, especially in light of the recent issues with messaging and the updates applied during that time.  

 Thank you again. If you have any questions or concerns please let us know at nightskyinfo@...

 -Dave Prosper and the NSN team
Administrator, NASA Night Sky Network (NSN)
Find upcoming astronomy events near you at nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/event-calendar.cfm
The NSN is managed by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


Polar Alignment

William Rust
 

Hi everybody.  The Pandemic gave me some incentive to finish an astrojob sitting on my desk waiting for me to polish it up.  I did that in March, and submitted my article to Amateur Astronomy Magazine, Summer 2021.  The title is: "Robust Polar Alignment with Flatness Application".  It works pretty fast (say 45 min for 3 sets of star sightings) to get to about 0.5 arcmin error in Altitude and Azimuth. Anyway,  Anything closer that that requires more sightings and is very tricky.  I thought I would share.  If you do astroimaging, then this would be a technique that might benefit you. I can send you a copy if you dont get AAM.
Bill


Re: Some interesting size comparisons for the Chesapeake Bay Impact Crater and lunar craters

jimcoble2000
 

I feel your pain. Far too many clicks for me. Too much sand for my little truck.

On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 05:39:51 PM EDT, galacticprobe via groups.io <lambulambu@...> wrote:


Log into Instructables... Log into Tinkercad... Log into Trek Moon...

Just what I need - more accounts to create and then try to keep track of when I can't even keep track of those I've already got for other places, not to mention the medication I need to take these days!

Dino.


-----Original Message-----
From: jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...>
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Aug 17, 2021 12:54 pm
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Some interesting size comparisons for the Chesapeake Bay Impact Crater and lunar craters

Oh you lucky dog. Owning your very own crater.

On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 11:28:47 AM EDT, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


Hey Mark,

Your timing couldn’t have been any better. Instructables just sent out a 3D topographic Moon map of Copernicus:

Those of us with access to 3D printers should print and share these with local Planetariums and Science Centers.

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Aug 16, 2021, at 23:22 20, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Yes that was T Scott Bruce from VADEQ, and David Powers from the USGS. I worked with Bruce on those last two bore holes I did in Newport News. We were not working on the crater per se but were doing a project for HRSD called SWIFT for deep water injection. It is very rare to drill that deep and there aren't all that many bore holes that go to bedrock here in the outer coastal plain. So if anyone is drilling it is nice to tag along to get information.

We were technically just outside the rim of the crater. I did see and have pictures of the Exmore Tsunami deposits caused by the Tsunami when the meteor/comet hit. It is quite a fascinating story.

On Monday, August 16, 2021, 10:50:13 PM EDT, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


Hey Mark,

I remember several years ago there were a group of people on NASA Langley digging holes and mapping the Crater and its impact (tee-hee)…

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Aug 16, 2021, at 22:45 12, Matthew Cook via groups.io <lt_mrcook@...> wrote:

Really great visuals Mark.


On Aug 16, 2021, at 22:30, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


I was doing some reading tonight and figuring out diameter to depth figures for the Chesapeake Bay Impact Crater which is centered in Cape Charles on the eastern shore of Virginia and extending to roughly east of Newport News a bit. I wondered what lunar craters matched it on the moon that could be observed in a telescope?

The Chesapeake Bay Crater was formed 35 million years ago and now is buried under subsequent sediments. The crater is roughly 56 miles in diameter and shattered bedrock to around 6 miles deep. This matches nicely with theoretical depth to diameter ratios for lunar complex craters of 1/6th to 1/10th. The Chesapeake crater also shows a central  uplift in the seismic profiles taken across the crater diameter.  This is analogous to the central peaks you see on complex lunar crater.

How can you visualize the Chesapeake Crater size by observing the moon? Well the diameter is pretty close to the bright crater Copernicus  obvious at first quarter. Looking at Copernicus you can see terraces that slumped unto the floor of the crater as the walls adjusted to the slope of the steepened transient crater during the initial formation. Picture sliding slabs rotating and dropping into the middle producing the stair step pattern inside the lunar crater. Same for the Chesapeake Crater. These are called the mega blocks. I may or may not have drilled into one of these during my last project installing deep injection wells for HRSD. We came up unexpectedly short to bedrock at around 800 feet below thew surface. That may or may not have been one of the terraces analogous to what you see on the moon. The previous well, west of there, went to 1300 feet and we would have expected the eastward well to go deeper before hitting bedrock but maybe we hit a block or terrace like the outer ring of Copernicus. Hard to say as normal faults also exist due to tectonics. 

But the point is if you want to picture what the buried crater looks like under the Chesapeake Bay, Copernicus is a very good model.



Re: Some interesting size comparisons for the Chesapeake Bay Impact Crater and lunar craters

galacticprobe
 

Log into Instructables... Log into Tinkercad... Log into Trek Moon...

Just what I need - more accounts to create and then try to keep track of when I can't even keep track of those I've already got for other places, not to mention the medication I need to take these days!

Dino.


-----Original Message-----
From: jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...>
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Aug 17, 2021 12:54 pm
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Some interesting size comparisons for the Chesapeake Bay Impact Crater and lunar craters

Oh you lucky dog. Owning your very own crater.

On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 11:28:47 AM EDT, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


Hey Mark,

Your timing couldn’t have been any better. Instructables just sent out a 3D topographic Moon map of Copernicus:

Those of us with access to 3D printers should print and share these with local Planetariums and Science Centers.

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Aug 16, 2021, at 23:22 20, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Yes that was T Scott Bruce from VADEQ, and David Powers from the USGS. I worked with Bruce on those last two bore holes I did in Newport News. We were not working on the crater per se but were doing a project for HRSD called SWIFT for deep water injection. It is very rare to drill that deep and there aren't all that many bore holes that go to bedrock here in the outer coastal plain. So if anyone is drilling it is nice to tag along to get information.

We were technically just outside the rim of the crater. I did see and have pictures of the Exmore Tsunami deposits caused by the Tsunami when the meteor/comet hit. It is quite a fascinating story.

On Monday, August 16, 2021, 10:50:13 PM EDT, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


Hey Mark,

I remember several years ago there were a group of people on NASA Langley digging holes and mapping the Crater and its impact (tee-hee)…

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Aug 16, 2021, at 22:45 12, Matthew Cook via groups.io <lt_mrcook@...> wrote:

Really great visuals Mark.


On Aug 16, 2021, at 22:30, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


I was doing some reading tonight and figuring out diameter to depth figures for the Chesapeake Bay Impact Crater which is centered in Cape Charles on the eastern shore of Virginia and extending to roughly east of Newport News a bit. I wondered what lunar craters matched it on the moon that could be observed in a telescope?

The Chesapeake Bay Crater was formed 35 million years ago and now is buried under subsequent sediments. The crater is roughly 56 miles in diameter and shattered bedrock to around 6 miles deep. This matches nicely with theoretical depth to diameter ratios for lunar complex craters of 1/6th to 1/10th. The Chesapeake crater also shows a central  uplift in the seismic profiles taken across the crater diameter.  This is analogous to the central peaks you see on complex lunar crater.

How can you visualize the Chesapeake Crater size by observing the moon? Well the diameter is pretty close to the bright crater Copernicus  obvious at first quarter. Looking at Copernicus you can see terraces that slumped unto the floor of the crater as the walls adjusted to the slope of the steepened transient crater during the initial formation. Picture sliding slabs rotating and dropping into the middle producing the stair step pattern inside the lunar crater. Same for the Chesapeake Crater. These are called the mega blocks. I may or may not have drilled into one of these during my last project installing deep injection wells for HRSD. We came up unexpectedly short to bedrock at around 800 feet below thew surface. That may or may not have been one of the terraces analogous to what you see on the moon. The previous well, west of there, went to 1300 feet and we would have expected the eastward well to go deeper before hitting bedrock but maybe we hit a block or terrace like the outer ring of Copernicus. Hard to say as normal faults also exist due to tectonics. 

But the point is if you want to picture what the buried crater looks like under the Chesapeake Bay, Copernicus is a very good model.



Boardwalk Astronomy #4 is Cancelled

Shawn Loescher
 

Due to an exceedingly poor forecast, tonight's Boardwalk Astronomy event has been cancelled. Hopefully next months final Boardwalk Astronomy event for 2021 will have better weather that evening.

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